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Torah Comes From Tarot Cards

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  • #46
    @tabibito It has everything to do with the Torah. But thanks for noticing those letters. I know some of these images, its either hit or miss. It's subjective to the person's belief or experience and how open minded we're willing to be. Healthy skepticism is always welcomed on the other hand.

    The most important of God's Names is the four-letter Name represented by the Hebrew letters Yod-Heh-Vav-Heh (YHVH). It is often referred to as the Ineffable Name, the Unutterable Name or the Distinctive Name. Linguistically, it is related to the Hebrew root Heh-Yod-Heh (to be), and reflects the fact that God's existence is eternal. In scripture, this Name is used when discussing God's relation with human beings, and when emphasizing his qualities of lovingkindness and mercy. It is frequently shortened to Yah (Yod-Heh), Yahu or Yeho (Yod-Heh-Vav), especially when used in combination with names or phrases, as in Yehoshua (Joshua, meaning "the Lord is my Salvation"), Eliyahu (Elijah, meaning "my God is the Lord"), and Halleluyah ("praise the Lord").

    The first Name used for God in scripture is Elohim. In form, the word is a masculine plural of a word that looks feminine in the singular (Eloha). The same word (or, according to Maimonides, a homonym of it) is used to refer to princes, judges, other gods, and other powerful beings. This Name is used in scripture when emphasizing God's might, His creative power, and his attributes of justice and rulership. Variations on this name include El, Eloha, Elohai (my God) and Elohaynu (our God).

    God is also known as El Shaddai. This Name is usually translated as "God Almighty," however, the derivation of the word "Shaddai" is not known. According to some views, it is derived from the root meaning "to heap benefits." According a Midrash, it means, "The One who said 'dai'" ("dai" meaning enough or sufficient) and comes from the fact that when God created the universe, it expanded until He said "DAI!" (perhaps the first record.

    Another significant Name of God is YHVH Tzva'ot. This Name is normally translated as "Lord of Hosts." The word "tzva'ot" means "hosts" in the sense of a military grouping or an organized array. The Name refers to God's leadership and sovereignty. Interestingly, this Name is rarely used in scripture. It never appears in the Torah(i.e., the first five books). It appears primarily in the prophetic books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi, as well as many times in the Psalms.

    Writing the Name of God
    Jews do not casually write any Name of God. This practice does not come from the commandment not to take the Lord's Name in vain, as many suppose. In Jewish thought, that commandment refers solely to oath-taking, and is a prohibition against swearing by God's Name falsely or frivolously (the word normally translated as "in vain" literally means "for falsehood").

    https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/the-name-of-god
    Last edited by JohnHermes; 04-29-2019, 06:40 AM.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by hamster View Post
      Okay, but the image of a woman framed by something is not exactly a profoundly complex pattern. I would expect it to show up independently anywhere a civilization is creating images.

      There's no indication that Torah and Tarot are etymologically connected, I'm not sure how you get that other than they sound similar. Tarot is German or Italian and there are plenty of German or Italian words that sound like "Tarot" that have nothing to do with "Torah." Both words appeared at different times and even if they were connected, it doesn't mean much. It's definitely not enough to say one produced the other.

      If the Tarot references the bible, like the scroll in your image, that doesn't prove anything significant. The cards evolved from card games played by Christian Europe in the 16th century. There's even a "Devil" card with a male and female figure on it which could be Adam and Eve
      Obviously it means Jews were vegetarians and only ate Carrots.

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      • #48
        I didn't see response, but hats off for bringing it to my attention @sparko. Actually @hamster that's pretty good, close but no cigar(it's tarot card number 6 the lovers tarot, not the devil but it does still theological significance nonetheless). That first website link I sent in the first post discusses a whole topic on the Lovers(Adam & Eve). I'm not going to bother quoting anymore so you can check it out if you want. Here's the exact link. http://www.yhwh.com/tarot/Tarot6.htm

        Notice the apple tree. And that slippery snake next to the woman!

        Last edited by JohnHermes; 04-29-2019, 03:58 PM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by JohnHermes View Post
          The story of the tarot is a biblical story which is the Torah. What's strange is that even the etymology is even close to each other. I know some words are just coincidences, but not in this case. Before the tarot was a tool used for mundane purposes, it was used as as a psycho-spiritual tool. Here's a card of the high priestess holding a biblical scroll with letter spelling out "TORA". The H is hidden behind her veil. There's a deep esoteric mystery behind the tarot which even most tarot readers don't even know about. Again to this day, it's mostly used for mundane purposes.



          http://www.yhwh.com/tarot/TarotInt.htm


          Wiki claims the tarot originated in europe. This isn't correct. Here's a ancient sumerian cylinder seal clearly being one of the first images that started to emerge as the tarot. The rider-waite deck clearly depicts the world card in their deck. Tarot cards are supposed to incorporate numerological and astrotheological symbols pertaining to each number which also pertains to the zodiac and the planets.

          Sumerian culture is appealed to as a support for ďancient astronautsĒ, Cthulhu, and Planet X. I would like an exact citation for the provenance, and immediate source, of that cylinder seal, or impression of one (if that is what it is).

          Why would that picture have anything to do with the tarot ?
          Last edited by Rushing Jaws; 04-29-2019, 07:47 PM.

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          • #50
            I'm talking about ancient esoteric Sumeria, which hasn't anything to do with "ancient astronauts" history channel. This isn't a zecharia sitchin disinformation thread. That's the world tarot card. if you're familiar with tarot images then it's difficult to know that. Beyondengima.com and ancient-origins.com have the information. Just visit the site and put "tarot" keywords. Ancient origins is missing one of the image post of the world tarot card. I'm not sure why it's not there anymore. It use to be sourced at their site, beyond enigma has it there. But I distinctly remember they said its at the "british museum". So if anyone is around that area care to check? lol
            Last edited by JohnHermes; 04-29-2019, 08:38 PM.

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            • #51
              Esoteric means stuff that are understood only by a few. For what purpose?

              Torah and tarot have no true connection at all, esoteric or otherwise. Some medieval occultist group dreamed it up to claim some strange mysterious doctrine that has nothing to do with God.
              Watch your links! http://www.theologyweb.com/campus/fa...corumetiquette

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              • #52
                Originally posted by JohnHermes View Post
                Yes we've concluded that the original tarot decks were created in medieval times, but their influence comes from a much older origin(Mesopotamia)
                Nope. They MODELED their images from the ancient world, and may have retro-fitted those ancient images with mysticism and arcane meanings, but that was the origin of those arcane and mystic interpretations, not the original images.

                as I posted one a pic of a of the "world" tarot on the cylinder seal, which date far before medieval times.
                No you didn't. you posted an unreferenced cylinder with a figure inside an oval which bears a minimal similarity to a tarot card. The original figure is probably of Gilgamesh and is in no way esoterically linked to that card.

                And the tarot themselves as we discussed are based on esoteric theology which have their eternal foundations.
                No they don't. They are made-up copies and re-imaginations of older unrelated art, sculptures, and concepts that has no root in the actual history of that art, sculpture, or concept.

                Especially when it comes to hermeticism. For example, the Magician card represents God in it's masculine form (based on esoteric tarot theology). I can go in details, but I'm sure you get the drift.

                I just want to post this real quick quote from that site I cited earlier.
                "Esoteric" tarot theology can not be traced any further back than the 1100s. It stole everything and repurposed it for tarot. It's quackery.
                That's what
                - She

                Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals
                - Manya the Holy Szin (The Quintara Marathon)

                I may not be as old as dirt, but me and dirt are starting to have an awful lot in common
                Stephen R. Donaldson

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                • #53
                  Minimal? Funny I posted the same image on reddit and everyone seems to say there's a high resemblance to the photo. There are far too many "coincidences" between the images to just write it off as a mere coincidence. Denying that then just falls into cognitive dissonance. The cylinder seal is at the british museum.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by JohnHermes View Post
                    Minimal? Funny I posted the same image on reddit and everyone seems to say there's a high resemblance to the photo. There are far too many "coincidences" between the images to just write it off as a mere coincidence. Denying that then just falls into cognitive dissonance. The cylinder seal is at the british museum.
                    Reddit? Well, why didn't you say so in the first place?
                    That's what
                    - She

                    Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals
                    - Manya the Holy Szin (The Quintara Marathon)

                    I may not be as old as dirt, but me and dirt are starting to have an awful lot in common
                    Stephen R. Donaldson

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by JohnHermes View Post
                      Minimal? Funny I posted the same image on reddit and everyone seems to say there's a high resemblance to the photo.
                      You wouldn't have happened to post that on r/Tarot, would you have?

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                      • #56
                        LOL. Reading the comments to the two threads he posted (with the exact same dual image as here), "everyone" was 2 people in r/tarot who said "yeah, they do look similar," one guy who said, "interesting," one was "seems like a stretch," (3 upvotes) and when he replied to that with "too many coincidences to be a coincidence, everyone I know who studies tarot sees it" spiel (paraphrased) another dude replied, "they study tarot not Sumerian history" (2 upvotes).

                        People on Tarot forums are telling him the same thing you guys told him here. LOL



                        Edit: Wow, people in other threads in r/tarot, people who actually believe in tarot are ripping his theory to shreds. "Fyi this is super not accurate, this theory was written before we translated the tablet. We know what heiroglyphics mean now and we know that tarot cards came from medical Europe." and "Iím not sure which is more compelling- the grammatical and punctuation errors, or the specious reasoning and dubious historical claims. But every exclamation point made me believe it more and more!"
                        Last edited by Adrift; 06-10-2019, 09:13 PM.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Adrift View Post
                          LOL. Reading the comments to the two threads he posted (with the exact same dual image as here), "everyone" was 2 people in r/tarot who said "yeah, they do look similar," one guy who said, "interesting," one was "seems like a stretch," (3 upvotes) and when he replied to that with "too many coincidences to be a coincidence, everyone I know who studies tarot sees it" spiel (paraphrased) another dude replied, "they study tarot not Sumerian history" (2 upvotes).

                          People on Tarot forums are telling him the same thing you guys told him here. LOL



                          Edit: Wow, people in other threads in r/tarot, people who actually believe in tarot are ripping his theory to shreds. "Fyi this is super not accurate, this theory was written before we translated the tablet. We know what heiroglyphics mean now and we know that tarot cards came from medical Europe." and "Iím not sure which is more compelling- the grammatical and punctuation errors, or the specious reasoning and dubious historical claims. But every exclamation point made me believe it more and more!"
                          Correct, even historians of Tarot tell you the history goes back only from the 13-15th century https://science.howstuffworks.com/sc...arot-card6.htm

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                          • #58
                            I know that this is a bit of a thread-necro, but considering the fact that I am one of the relatively few Neo-Pagans on these boards and considering that I have a particular fascination with the history of Tarot, I thought I would put in my two cents.

                            There is a fantastic book on the subject by Dr. Helen Farley called A Cultural History of Tarot: From Entertainment to Esotericism which I highly recommend for anyone interested in the subject. She traces the roots of the decks and their artistic and compositional changes through the centuries. She discusses all of the extant sources on the usage of Tarot cards. She extensively cites her research and explicitly notes the few times when she engages in speculation. She treats the material seriously and with scholarly intent, even (and especially) when discussing the more esoteric developments in the history of the cards. I stumbled upon the book while doing some research for a tabletop RPG character I was making (yep, I'm that kind of nerd) and proceeded to devour it as quickly as I could.

                            Long story short: Tarot cards were first created for a trick-taking card game in 15th Century Northern Italy. The earliest known source which associates Tarot with cartomancy comes around 300 years later. Most of the esoteric notions, mystical claims, and erroneous history (particularly claims of Egyptian origin for the cards) arise even later than that with the popular occult movements of the 19th Century.

                            Even shorter: imagine somebody pulled out a set of Pokemon cards and told you they could use them to divine your future.
                            Last edited by Boxing Pythagoras; 05-13-2020, 07:24 PM.
                            "[Mathematics] is the revealer of every genuine truth, for it knows every hidden secret, and bears the key to every subtlety of letters; whoever, then, has the effrontery to pursue physics while neglecting mathematics should know from the start he will never make his entry through the portals of wisdom."
                            --Thomas Bradwardine, De Continuo (c. 1325)

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Boxing Pythagoras View Post
                              I know that this is a bit of a thread-necro, but considering the fact that I am one of the relatively few Neo-Pagans on these boards and considering that I have a particular fascination with the history of Tarot, I thought I would put in my two cents.

                              There is a fantastic book on the subject by Dr. Helen Farley called A Cultural History of Tarot: From Entertainment to Esotericism which I highly recommend for anyone interested in the subject. She traces the roots of the decks and their artistic and compositional changes through the centuries. She discusses all of the extant sources on the usage of Tarot cards. She extensively cites her research and explicitly notes the few times when she engages in speculation. She treats the material seriously and with scholarly intent, even (and especially) when discussing the more esoteric developments in the history of the cards. I stumbled upon the book while doing some research for a tabletop RPG character I was making (yep, I'm that kind of nerd) and proceeded to devour it as quickly as I could.

                              Long story short: Tarot cards were first created for a trick-taking card game in 15th Century Northern Italy. The earliest known source which associates Tarot with cartomancy comes around 300 years later. Most of the esoteric notions, mystical claims, and erroneous history (particularly claims of Egyptian origin for the cards) arise even later than that with the popular occult movements of the 19th Century.

                              Even shorter: imagine somebody pulled out a set of Pokemon cards and told you they could use them to divine your future.
                              I remember when playing one of the Assassin's Creed games hearing a guard say "want to play a game of Tarot after our shift?" got me curious on it. Definitely an interesting bit of history.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Boxing Pythagoras View Post
                                Even shorter: imagine somebody pulled out a set of Pokemon cards and told you they could use them to divine your future.
                                "Ah, yes, I see. You drew Ash's Pikachu. That means you're going to be the very best, that no ever was. But there is a catch, which is that you will not achieve this without some seriously grueling training."

                                ~Formerly known as Chrawnus~

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