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The Dead "End" is not a Dead End.

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  • The Dead "End" is not a Dead End.

    To suggest that every Jewish woman is ---ritually speaking --- perpetually virgin --- goes to the very heart of the most foundational symbolism in the Torah.

    Genesis 2:5-6:

    And every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground. But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground. And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his mouth the breath of life . . .
    In the Hebrew, if not the English translation, there's a number of clear symbols which reverberate throughout the rest of the Tanakh. "There was not a man to till the ground." After the Fall the serpent is made to slither on the ground and Adam is made to "till the ground from which he was taken" (Gen. 3:23). "Tilling the ground" is associated with the original sin (phallic-sex) such that we have Adam condemned to "tilling the ground" in order to eat his bread (Gen. 3:19). His "bread" is made from tilling the ground. It's leavened bread in that the serpent is what Adam uses to till the ground to make his bread.

    Prior to Adam's sin a "mist" or "dew" lies on the surface of the soil and it's from the mixture of this "mist" or "dew" this mud, or apar (ayin-pey-reish) עפר that God creates the first Adam (prelapsarian Adam). --- In other words, Adam isn't formed from the "tilled ground" ("ground" being spelled alef-dalet-mem-heh אדמה vs. ayin-pey-reish עפר). He's formed from the mud that arises when the "dew" or "mist" and the "ground" (adamah) combine in the stead of the future "tilling" of the earth associated with the serpent's belly (so to say) and Adam's labor --- the combination that opens up the earth to make leavened bread.

    In this formative and fundamental symbolism "mist" and "dew" do not enter "tilled" ground (which comes only after the phallic-Fall). The mists and the dew mix with the un-tilled ground to form sinless Adam. The first Adam doesn't come from the tilled ground like all of his offspring. He comes from mist and ground mixing in a pre-tilling manner.

    Adam's name is suggestive of the nature of the "mist" or "dew" that rather than entering the earth to form him, remains on top of the earth almost as though it were an ornament rather than the sort of seed that must go into the earth or come out of the earth. "Adamah" can mean "red" even as bdellium (the color of manna) was associated with the color red. In Hebrew Adam's name means the blood of the alef, or ox. Alef---dalet-mem אדם. Blood is spelled dalet-mem דם such that Adam's name means the blood of the alef (the alef being a pictogram of the ram of God created before the foundation of the world).

    Adam was red-skinned. Because he was created from the blood (dam dalet-mem דם) of God.

    Manna, which was created when dew mixed with ground, was red two [sic].

    Jesus implied that he was manna. He was created like the first Adam, with God's very blood, in a process that didn't include tilling the earth. In his own mind, at least, Jesus was the second Adam, the original son of Eve and Yahweh (who Eve mistook for Cain). He was conceived before Eve's earthen body was tilled by the serpent and Adam, the latter resulting in the births of Cain and Abel.

    When the Jewish groom crushes a wine glass under the chuppah a red mist from the ordeal lands on the bride's dress transforming the virgin bride into the prelapsarian "ground" ----the virgin (pre-toilling) adamah. The dress becomes the apar (ayin-peh-reish) which, when combined with the blood from the wine glass (shin-peh-kaph-heh), the sapkah, affects the consummation of another Adam formed in the likeness of the prelapsarian first Adam. In ritual and now in reality two [sic], the Jewish virgin is the biological emblem of the pre-toiled ground from which Adam was formed prior to the ground being opened by a rod endowed with teeth with which to both open the earth and spread seed.

    The Jewish virgin is not supposed to have her body opened with a rod with teeth and seed spreading abilities. She's supposed to form a firstborn male prior to her body being tilled by a postlapsarian son of Adam. Her bridegroom has supposedly sided with God against the serpent such that his very gift to his bride is the breaking of the rod with which Adam first tilled the soil, the serpent looking to slither into the pages of history in the privycy (sapkah) of the most holy place on the human body.



    XR

  • #2
    The Jewish virgin is not supposed to have her body opened with a rod with teeth and seed spreading abilities. She's supposed to form a firstborn male prior to her body being tilled by a postlapsarian son of Adam. Her bridegroom has supposedly sided with God against the serpent such that his very gift to his bride is the breaking of the rod with which Adam first tilled the soil, the serpent looking to slither into the pages of history in the privycy (sapkah) of the most holy place on the human body.
    Messiah is said to be born (or conceived) on Tisha B'Av. Therefore, the crushing of the wine glass under the chuppah, even if it's said to represent the destruction of the temple, still represents the conception of the first actual Jew --- Messiah.

    When the wine glass is crushed it represents circumcision, the sapkah (privy member), which is a lamb skin flask שפכה, is crushed and blood is spilled. The blood represents the final sacrifice before the temple is destroyed. The last offering. And it's given from the groom to the bride as the gift of salvation for her and the firstborn now conceive in her womb as God's offering to the groom. A remarkably fitting recompense for his (the groom's) particular sacrifice.


    XR

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    • #3
      Messiah is conceived or born on Tisha B'Av (the ninth of Av, the very day that twice the temple was destroyed). The temple design is anthropomorphic. Many Rabbis concede to this. Rabbi Hirsch says the head tefillin symbolizes the Ark of the Covenant such that the male Jew's body is representative of the temple (or vice versa). There's question concerning whether the temple is male or female. It has a veil covering the nuptial chamber . . . but so does the male. There's a male hymen.

      Many scriptures make the temple the bride of God. And it is. Messiah is the bride of God and the husband of Israel. . . And again, this (the idea of the possibility of being God's bride and a human being's husband) is Rabbinic, and not a new opinion. In fact, the Jewish groom is symbolically, ritually, the bride of God and the husband of a Jewish woman. So in type, the Jewish groom is (like Adam before the Fall) androgynous: female to God but male to his female element (which at one point wasn't separate from his body).

      The temple thus represents prelapsarian Adam. It's androgynous. It's male toward mankind but female to God. -------- It's God's bride.

      Jewish ritual implies that the Jewish firstborn is born of the blood of the Jewish male (specifically the blood associated with his particular sacrifice) rather than the seed that would father the firstborn if circumcision didn't occur. In the Passover, this blood is placed on the outside of the house (it doesn't enter the house). It ornaments the house even as circumcision blood is an ornament for the bride.

      Tisha B'Av is the day the temple is destroyed. Franz Rosenszweig suggests that the Jewish groom wears his death attire under the chuppah to represent the fact that his love for the bride is stronger than death. The actual bridegroom is called on this by the sitra achra (the "other side"). He dies under the chuppah to free the bride and his offspring from the death-dealing serpent he found on his body after the bride ("rib" -- tsaddi-lamed-ayin צלע) was removed from him prior to the original sin.

      Adam had no temptation to eat of the tree of sexual knowledge while he was androgynous. And he had no phallus until the Elohim closed up the place on his body where Eve was removed leaving the tell-tale sign of the violence and crime that's the suture known as the frenulum. In symbol, the Jewish groom, having realized the serpent's crime, and it's cover-up (the foreskin covers the frenulum), first un–covers the forensic proof the crime --- milah --- and then goes all the way by destroying the very membrane that makes him a virgin temple --- periah.

      Crushing the wine glass under the chuppah represents the groom destroying the virginity that makes his body a fitting temple to God (periah tears the membrane of virginity after the suture associated with the Elohim's crime has already been uncovered through milah). After the crushing of the wine glass the groom can no longer be God's bride or his bride's husband.



      XR
      Last edited by Xtian Rabinovich; 02-18-2015, 11:36 PM.

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