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repent vs repent

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  • repent vs repent

    The base definition provided by Lidell for μετανοεω does not give any hint of remorse or regret
    μετανο-έω ,
    A.perceive afterwards or too late, opp. προνοέω, Epich. [280]; opp. προβουλεύομαι, Democr.66; concur subsequently, τισι BGU747 i 11 (ii A. D.).
    2. change one's mind or purpose, Pl. Euthd.279c, Men.Epit.72; μ. μὴ οὔτε . . τῶν χαλεπῶν ἔργων ᾖ τὸ . . ἄρχειν change one's opinion and think that it is not . . , X.Cyr.1.1.3.
    3. repent, Antipho 2.4.12; “ἐν τοῖς ἀνηκέστοις” Id.5.91: freq. in LXX and NT, Si.48.15, al.; “ἀπὸ τῆς κακίας” Act.Ap.8.22; “ἐκ τῶν ἔργων” Apoc.9.20; “ἐπὶ τῇ ἀκαθαρσίᾳ” 2 Ep.Cor.12.21, cf. OGI751.9 (Amblada, ii B. C.); “ἐπί τινι” Luc.Salt.84, etc.; “περί τινων” Plu.Galb.6; “τοῖς πεπραγμένοις” Id.Agis 19: c. part., “μ. γενόμενος Ἕλλην” Luc.Am. 36.
    4. c. acc., repent of, “τὴν ἄφιξιν” J.BJ4.4.5.

    Theological dictionaries generally seem to add "remorse" and "regret" to the base definition.

    which seems to be conflating μετανοεω with μεταμελομαι (this being what Judas exhibited after betraying Christ)
    μεταμέλ-ομαι , rare exc. in pres. and impf.: fut. -
    A.“μελήσομαι” Phld.Rh.2.16 S., also -“μεληθήσομαι” LXX Ps.109(110).4, Sch.E.Ph. 899: aor. -εμελήθην Plb.8.23.2, D.S.19.75, later -ήσθην PThead. 51.15 (iv A. D.); also Ep. μετεμέμβλετο prob. in Panyas. in Et.Gen. s.v. μῦθος (Coll.Alex.p.249 Powell): pf. -“μεμέλημαι” LXX 1 Ma.11.10, Phld.Vit.p.34 J.:—feel repentance, regret:—Constr.:
    1. c. part., μετεμέλοντο οὐ δεξάμενοι they repented that they had not . . , Th.4.27, cf. 7.50; μ. ὅτι . . Id.5.14; “ὁ μεταμελόμενος” Arist.EN1110b23.
    2. μεταμέλεσθαί τινι repent at a thing, D.S.15.9; “ἐπί τινι” Id.19.75; τινων Phalar.Ep.43.
    3. abs., change one's purpose or line of conduct, X.Cyr.4.6.5, Plb.4.50.6.
    II. causal in fut. part., τὸ μεταμελησόμενον that which will cause regret, matter for future repentance, X.Mem.2.6.23.
    III. = μεταμέλει 1.1, “μεταμέλεσθαι αὐτοῖς περὶ ὧν ἂν συμβουλεύσωνται” Pl.Demod.382d.:—the form μεταμελέομαι , censured by Thom.Mag.p.123 R., occurs in Hp.Ep.27.

    Does the Church of Rome also make no distinction between the two, or is this a Protestant view?
    sigpic1 Cor 15:34 εκνηψατε δικαιως και μη αμαρτανετε αγνωσιαν γαρ θεου τινες εχουσιν προς εντροπην υμιν λεγω

  • #2
    I'm not sure what you're getting at, as both definitions include "changing one's mind or purpose".... I'm supposing that the REASON for the change is assumed as being remorse or regret. What other reason could be assumed?
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
      I'm not sure what you're getting at, as both definitions include "changing one's mind or purpose".... I'm supposing that the REASON for the change is assumed as being remorse or regret. What other reason could be assumed?
      Shame. The Bible was written to a culture that did not have a strong sense of "conscience", rather, a sense of "Shame" (and conversely Honor) ruled the roost. So, changing could encompass not just your remorse or regret, but also, family or public pressure to change for the honor of the collective...as a sense of duty as much as regret.
      "What has the Church gained if it is popular, but there is no conviction, no repentance, no power?" - A.W. Tozer

      "... there are two parties in Washington, the stupid party and the evil party, who occasionally get together and do something both stupid and evil, and this is called bipartisanship." - Everett Dirksen

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Littlejoe View Post
        Shame. The Bible was written to a culture that did not have a strong sense of "conscience", rather, a sense of "Shame" (and conversely Honor) ruled the roost. So, changing could encompass not just your remorse or regret, but also, family or public pressure to change for the honor of the collective...as a sense of duty as much as regret.
        I'll buy that.
        "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
          I'm not sure what you're getting at, as both definitions include "changing one's mind or purpose".... I'm supposing that the REASON for the change is assumed as being remorse or regret. What other reason could be assumed?
          Quite frequently remorse for doing the wrong thing would be assumed and even normal, but there are occasions when there are other reasons (Shame (as noted by Littlejoe), or even simply realising "no, this isn't where I want to be going after all." Also - repentance doesn't denote the original direction or intention - a person can repent of Christianity (which would be termed "apostasy"), for example. .... But the main issue is that remorse is often considered to be repentance, rather than something that leads to repentance.
          sigpic1 Cor 15:34 εκνηψατε δικαιως και μη αμαρτανετε αγνωσιαν γαρ θεου τινες εχουσιν προς εντροπην υμιν λεγω

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tabibito View Post
            Quite frequently remorse for doing the wrong thing would be assumed and even normal, but there are occasions when there are other reasons (Shame (as noted by Littlejoe), or even simply realising "no, this isn't where I want to be going after all." Also - repentance doesn't denote the original direction or intention - a person can repent of Christianity (which would be termed "apostasy"), for example. .... But the main issue is that remorse is often considered to be repentance, rather than something that leads to repentance.
            Yeah, after LJ's post, I thought about the difference, for example, in our society of somebody being "sorry they got caught" rather than "sorry they committed the offense".
            "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
              Yeah, after LJ's post, I thought about the difference, for example, in our society of somebody being "sorry they got caught" rather than "sorry they committed the offense".
              That's one I hadn't considered. Though ... self indulgent breast beating did occur to me.
              sigpic1 Cor 15:34 εκνηψατε δικαιως και μη αμαρτανετε αγνωσιαν γαρ θεου τινες εχουσιν προς εντροπην υμιν λεγω

              Comment

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