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James K. A. Smith Apologetics Videos

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  • whag
    replied
    Originally posted by firstfloor View Post
    An interesting question at the end of the longer video (last 6 minutes or so) goes something like this;

    Q. Unapologetic particularity leaves room for pluralism. What happens when that pluralism encounters fundamentalism (you say that you have to realise that you’re not the only game in town so you allow for pluralism) what do you do when [the purpose of fundamentalism’s game] is to end all other games.

    A. That’s a question I don’t have an answer to. There is a relevant virtue here which is hope. You hope to change the fundamentalist’s mind on the need for pluralism by demonstrating martyrdom or something???

    So, in other words, (allow me to help him out a bit) we need to work together to stamp out religious fundamentalism. Seems like a good idea to me.
    "Stamping out fundamentalism" is a very aggressive idea to more liberal, progressive Christians who know, associate with, and perhaps worship with fundamentalists. Many prominent t-webbers are fundamentalists.

    The question is how do theologians like Smith, Enns, and Richard Beck convey a faith that acknowledges the amplified legitimacy of theodicy introduced by post modernity while not seeming like a compromise. Compromise is the worry that perpetuates all fundamentalism, be it Islamic, Mormon, or Hindu.

    Leave a comment:


  • firstfloor
    replied
    An interesting question at the end of the longer video (last 6 minutes or so) goes something like this;

    Q. Unapologetic particularity leaves room for pluralism. What happens when that pluralism encounters fundamentalism (you say that you have to realise that you’re not the only game in town so you allow for pluralism) what do you do when [the purpose of fundamentalism’s game] is to end all other games.

    A. That’s a question I don’t have an answer to. There is a relevant virtue here which is hope. You hope to change the fundamentalist’s mind on the need for pluralism by demonstrating martyrdom or something???

    So, in other words, (allow me to help him out a bit) we need to work together to stamp out religious fundamentalism. Seems like a good idea to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • seer
    replied
    I like his quote in the the first video from the author Barnes - "I don't believe in God, but I miss Him..."

    Leave a comment:


  • Paprika
    replied
    tl;dl

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  • whag
    replied
    I like Smith. An apologist's stance on evolution and a historical fall is kind of a litmus test if he/she is to be taken seriously. Following Smith's review of Pete Enns' The Evolution of Adam (a great book, BTW), a highly instructive and stimulating debate blossomed in blogs and chatrooms about the necessity of a historical Adam. Smith takes the more conservative view. No Christian should ever enter the apologetic fray without first familiarizing him/herself with this debate, and few people in Christian apologetics express it more thoughtfully and considerately than these two men.

    I disagree with Smith on historical Adam, but at least he's a pleasure to listen to and read.

    http://www.colossianforum.org/2014/07/10/6195/
    Last edited by whag; 12-12-2014, 02:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikewhitney
    started a topic James K. A. Smith Apologetics Videos

    James K. A. Smith Apologetics Videos

    I was unsure whether to post this to apologetics or philosophy.

    James presents some interesting characteristics about postmodernism philosophy as leaving room for people to accept Christianity. One point he spoke of had matched my idea, namely that younger people were interested in getting to the heart of Christianity, often seeking this heart through the most ancient forms of Christianity. These older forms, in my estimation, are like Eastern Orthodox or Jewish-influenced forms of Christianity.

    I got curious about James Smith via a review of a book by him on hermeneutics:
    The Fall of Interpretation: Philosophical Foundations for a Creational Hermeneutic
    (But I have not gotten this book yet.)

    James K. A. Smith, "The Secular is Haunted"



    I liked this next video better...

    James K.A. Smith on Postmodernism & Religion

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