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The Old Covenant has been obliterated (Hebrews 8:13).

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  • The Old Covenant has been obliterated (Hebrews 8:13).

    Hebrews 8:13
    In that He says, "A new covenant," He has made the first obsolete. Now what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away (Hebrews 8:13, NASB).
    1. Danker: treat the first covenant as obsolete Hb 8:13a (A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, palaiow, page 751).
    2. NIDNTT: Heb. 8:13 takes up the promise of the new covenant of Jer. 31:31-35: "In speaking of a new covenant he treats the first as obsolete [pepalaiwken]. And what is becoming obsolete [palaioumenon] and growing old [geeraskon] is ready to vanish away." This is entirely God's work. Seeing that God in Christ makes a new covenant, the old covenant of the law has become obsolete. In Christ the first can be regarded only as old and fulfilled (2 Cor. 3:14) (2:716, Old/One, H. Haarbeck).
    3. TDNT: God Himself declares in Jer. 31 that the first covenant is outmoded, and He promises a new one. The first covenant is now a venerable institution with all the signs of age and decay. It has no more right to existence, 8:13 (3:282, arxiereus - high priest, Schrenk).
    4. TDNT: The new covenant --> "It is the perfect counterpart of its predecessor, which has now been superseded and doomed to perish, 8:13; cf. 7:18f" (3:450, kainos - new, Behm).
    5. Louw/Nida: to cause to become old and obsolete, and hence no longer valid -'to make old, to make out of date.' 'by speaking of a new covenant, he has made the first one out of date' He 8.13 (Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains, 67:103, palaiow, page 643).
    6. Wuest: Concerning "made old": is in the perfect tense, which tense speaks of an action completed in past time having present results. Thus, we could translate, "In saying new, He has permanently antiquated the first (covenant)." The word "decayeth" is the translation of the same verb, and we have "that which is being antiquated." The words "waxeth old" are the translation of gerasko which means "to grow old" and carries with it the suggestion of the waning strength and the decay which are incident to old age. It has the meanings also of being obsolescent, failing from age (Word Studies in the Greek New Testament, Kenneth Wuest, Volume 2, page 149, Hebrews 8:13).


    Unless a command from the Old Covenant is repeated in the New Covenant it is not binding upon the Christian. In fact, 9 Commandments from the Decalogue are repeated in the New Covenant. Since the command to obey the Sabbath is not repeated in the New Covenant it follows that Christians are not required to obey the command to physically rest on the 7th day.
    The Sabbath command is not repeated under the new covenant while the other nine are:
    1. No other gods (Romans 1:25)
    2. No images/idols to worship (Ephesians 5:5)
    3. Name in vain (1 Timothy 6:1)
    4. Sabbath (N/A)
    5. Father and mother (Ephesians 6:2)
    6. Murder (Romans 13:9)
    7. Adultery (Romans 13:9)
    8. Steal (Romans 13:9)
    9. Lies (Romans 13:9)
    10. Covet (Romans 13:9)
    a. NIDNTT: On Colossians 2:16, Here Paul argues that the Jewish law (the legal demands) were cancelled in the death of Christ (v. 14), and therefore the Jewish food regulations and religious calendar are not binding on the Christian. Included in this ritual was the Jewish sabbath observance. These observances, Paul claims, pointed to a spiritual reality fulfilled in Christ (3:410, Sabbath, W. Stott).
    b. TDNT: With liberation from bondage to the basic principles of the world the regulations are also set aside so that the Christian community is definitely freed from the Sabbath commandment - no matter whether this is based on the supposed necessity of the Law to salvation or on the controlling power of cosmic forces (7:30, Sabbaton, Lohse).


    The New Covenant began on Pentecost (Acts 2:4).
    1. NIDNTT: What until Pentecost, the decisive date for the universal church, was the privilege of only a few individuals, is from that day forward the most important characteristic of the Jewish and subsequently (cf. Acts 10) the Gentile church. According to Acts 2:4, all were "filled with the Holy Spirit" (1:739, Fullness, R. Schippers).
    2. NIDNTT: Under the heading "Significance of Pentecost for Luke" we read "...it is the fulfilment of the covenant promise (2:39; 3:25; 13:23, 32; 26:6), emphasizing the role of Pentecost as the institution of the new covenant. So too his description of events before and after Pentecost underlines that for Luke Pentecost is the birthday of the church (2:38, 41, 42, 43-47) (2:786, Pentecost, J.D.G. Dunn).
    3. TDNT: Concerning Acts 2:4, "This event is regarded by Luke as the birthday of the church" (6:50, pentekoste, Lohse).
    4. Thayer: in the beginning, when the church was founded, Acts 11:15 (Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, arche, page 76).
    5. The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible: The primary reference to Pentecost in the NT is in connection with the pouring of the Holy Spirit to dwell in the church (Acts 2:1). This event was in answer to the explicit promise of Christ (Jn. 16:7, 13; Acts 1:4, 14). It is almost universally agreed among theologians that Pentecost marks the beginning of the church as an institution (4:783, Pentecost, C.L. Feinberg).
    6. NIDOTTE: The Spirit of God is the agent of creation (Ps 104:29; Job 33:4). His Spirit was active not only at the original creation (Gen 1:2) and at the re-creation after the Flood (8:1), but also at the creation of the people of Israel (in the form of wind, Exod 14:19-20; 15:10) and at the creation of the church (Acts 2:1-4) (3:1075, ruah, Van Pelt/Kaiser/ Block).
    7. Vine: In the Epistles the only direct mentions are in Col. 2:16, "a sabbath day," R.V. (which rightly has the singular, see 1st parag., above), where it is listed among things that were "a shadow of the things to come" (i.e., of the age introduced at Pentecost) (Vine's Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, Sabbath, page 984).
    8. David Peterson: (Acts 1:26): It is important to observe that there are no further examples of such decision making in the NT. As those who were about to enjoy the benefits of the New Covenant, the apostles were using a practice that was sanctioned by God but belonged to the old era. It took place before Pentecost, when the Spirit was poured out in a way that signified a new kind of relationship between God and his people. From Luke's emphasis on the Spirit's role in giving wisdom, guidance, and direction, it would appear that the apostolic example on this occasion is not to be followed by Christians today (Pillar New Testament Commentary, Acts, page 128-129).
    Last edited by foudroyant; 01-29-2014, 07:09 AM.

  • #2


    The New Covenant began with the death of the Testator, Jesus Christ, our Lord.
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

    Comment


    • #3
      From the OP:
      5. The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible: The primary reference to Pentecost in the NT is in connection with the pouring of the Holy Spirit to dwell in the church (Acts 2:1). This event was in answer to the explicit promise of Christ (Jn. 16:7, 13; Acts 1:4, 14). It is almost universally agreed among theologians that Pentecost marks the beginning of the church as an institution (4:783, Pentecost, C.L. Feinberg).

      You don't fall into the "almost universally agreed" upon point.
      No need to shake your head in disbelief when it is you who belong to the small minority.

      Comment


      • #4
        You're tying the "beginning of the Church" to the beginning of the New Covenant. You're forcing them be one in the same.
        Your "proof" is about the beginning of the Church, though your premise is about the Covenant.

        Jesus said, "this cup is the New Testament in my Blood".... the Covenant is the same has his "Will and Testament", and with His death, it became of affect.

        I am NOT disputing that "the beginning of the Church" began at Pentecost, so you're WRONG about me being "in the minority" on that.
        "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

        Comment


        • #5
          Already addressed:
          2. NIDNTT: Under the heading "Significance of Pentecost for Luke" we read "...it is the fulfilment of the covenant promise (2:39; 3:25; 13:23, 32; 26:6), emphasizing the role of Pentecost as the institution of the new covenant. So too his description of events before and after Pentecost underlines that for Luke Pentecost is the birthday of the church (2:38, 41, 42, 43-47) (2:786, Pentecost, J.D.G. Dunn).

          Comment


          • #6
            Hebrews 9 [15]*And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance. [16]*For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. [17]*For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.

            When Jesus died, His Testament became in effect.
            "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

            Comment


            • #7
              The key is to note the exodus narrative in Luke-Acts ("Moses and Elijah, who appeared in glory and spoke of his exodon, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem"), which climaxes with the Crucifixion (Passover) and the giving of the Spirit (Pentecost, which celebrated the anniversary of the giving of the Law on Sinai). Therefore I believe that the New Covenant was initiated at the last supper and completed by the Crucifixion and Pentecost.

              But I really don't think it's important to pinpoint the precise moment.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by foudroyant View Post
                Already addressed:
                No, it wasn't.

                2. NIDNTT: Under the heading "Significance of Pentecost for Luke" we read "...it is the fulfilment of the covenant promise (2:39; 3:25; 13:23, 32; 26:6), emphasizing the role of Pentecost as the institution of the new covenant.
                Yes, the COVENANT came into effect at the Death of Christ, and AS A RESULT we have Pentecost and the institution of the Church.

                So too his description of events before and after Pentecost underlines that for Luke Pentecost is the birthday of the church (2:38, 41, 42, 43-47) (2:786, Pentecost, J.D.G. Dunn).
                Sure, the "birthday of the Church" comes as a result of the New Covenant, which came into effect at the Death of the Testator.
                "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                Comment


                • #9
                  His death COUPLED with the giving of the Spirit is when the New Covenant began:

                  "As for Me, this is My covenant with them," says the LORD: "My Spirit which is upon you, and My words which I have put in your mouth shall not depart from your mouth, nor from the mouth of your offspring, nor from the mouth of your offspring's offspring," says the LORD, "from now and forever." (Isaiah 59:21, NASB)


                  a. NIDNTT: Through the process of judgment and salvation, God heals his people’s idolatry and backsliding (Hos. 4:12: cf. Isa. 29:14), giving a new spirit of godliness, not only to the nation at large (Ezek. 11:19 f.; 18:31; 36:26 f.; 39:29), but also to the individual (Ps. 51[50]:10). Ezekiel declares this to be nothing less than Israel’s resurrection from the dead – his death having been caused by unbelief (Ezek. 37:1-14). The later chapters of Isaiah proclaim the same message: the Servant of the Lord extends the blessings of his rule (already described in ch. 11) to include the Gentiles (42:1-4; 49:1-6), the covenant promise being fulfilled in God’s irrevocable gift of his Spirit (59:21; cf. Joel 2:28 f.). Similarly in the past, the period of salvation at the exodus had been marked by the gift of the Spirit to Moses; indeed that whole national deliverance had taken place in the power of the Spirit (Isa. 63:11-14). The post-exilic prophets see this promise fulfilled in the re-establishment of Israel in Jerusalem (Hag. 2:5: the spirit in the midst of the people gives protection; Zech. 4:6: salvation comes not from any army nor from any human power, but from the Spirit of God). In this prophecy God’s almighty, all-pervasive but intangible Spirit is linked with the covenant, for the latter reveals God not only working for the salvation of his people but bringing their lives into active conformity with his holy will, despite their hostility towards him (3:692, Spirit, J.D.G. Dunn).

                  b. NIDNOTTE: Finally, in the prophets' eschatological visions they foresee a time when God will pour out his Holy Spirit on his people in unprecedented fashion. This liquid imagery occurs four times, always in the context of Israel’s restoration and covenant renewal (Isa 32:15; 44:3-4; Ezek 39:29; Joel 2:28 [31]…the pouring out of God’s Spirit represents the definitive act whereby the Lord claims and seals the restored Israel as his own covenant people” (3:1077, ruah, Van Pelt/Kaiser/Block).
                  Last edited by foudroyant; 01-29-2014, 08:11 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You say:
                    Yes, the COVENANT came into effect at the Death of Christ

                    but the NIDNTT says Pentecost was the institution of the new covenant. NIDNTT: Under the heading "Significance of Pentecost for Luke" we read "...it is the fulfilment of the covenant promise (2:39; 3:25; 13:23, 32; 26:6), emphasizing the role of Pentecost as the institution of the new covenant. (see Dunn)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by foudroyant View Post
                      His death COUPLED with the giving of the Spirit is when the New Covenant began:
                      Nope. As is your bent, you are being legalistic and divisive.
                      "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bent? Well the "dent" in your theology comes when you challenge how words are defined. I already cited Isaiah 59:21 as well.
                        Legalistic? I cited more than one scholar that agrees with me. You cited....Yourself
                        Divisive? You were the one who came here and challenged me.
                        Last edited by foudroyant; 01-29-2014, 08:16 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paprika View Post
                          But I really don't think it's important to pinpoint the precise moment.
                          I agree. UNLESS, of course, one is a legalistic divisive picker of nit. The END RESULT is that we are under the New Covenant, and PRAISE GOD FOR THAT!
                          "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by foudroyant View Post
                            Bent?
                            Yup.

                            Well the "dent" in your theology comes when you challenge how words are defined. I already cited Isaiah 59:21 as well.
                            Nope.
                            "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
                              I agree. UNLESS, of course, one is a legalistic divisive picker of nit. The END RESULT is that we are under the New Covenant, and PRAISE GOD FOR THAT!
                              From the OP:
                              5. The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible: The primary reference to Pentecost in the NT is in connection with the pouring of the Holy Spirit to dwell in the church (Acts 2:1). This event was in answer to the explicit promise of Christ (Jn. 16:7, 13; Acts 1:4, 14). It is almost universally agreed among theologians that Pentecost marks the beginning of the church as an institution (4:783, Pentecost, C.L. Feinberg).

                              I pointed out this to you again Post #3 but you just wanted to continue being "divisive".

                              You accuse me of what you do.

                              Comment

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