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Apocryphal Books

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  • Apocryphal Books

    I'm not sure if this is in the right section, so move it if necessary.

    This is just a general question about the Apocryphal books, and their place within Christianity. I've read the book of Enoch, but I'm very ignorant of the Apocryphal books otherwise. It's my understanding that both the Roman Catholics and Orthodox consider them canonical--correct?

    Anyone have any wisdom to share? Consider me a complete novice on the subject.
    I DENOUNCE DONALD J. TRUMP AND ALL HIS IMMORAL ACTS.

  • #2
    It's good here Zym
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Zymologist View Post
      I'm not sure if this is in the right section, so move it if necessary.

      This is just a general question about the Apocryphal books, and their place within Christianity. I've read the book of Enoch, but I'm very ignorant of the Apocryphal books otherwise. It's my understanding that both the Roman Catholics and Orthodox consider them canonical--correct?
      Sort of. IIRC only the Ethiopian Orthodox accept 1 Enoch as canonical (and 2 Enoch = Slavonic Enoch, IIRC). It's not typically considered a part of the Apocrypha, AFAIK.

      The Roman Catholic canon is well-defined - whatever is in the Vulgate is canonical.

      The Orthodox canon is rather less well-defined, as no council has opined on the content of the Old Testament canon AFAIK. There is also no Old Testament lectionary in Orthodox tradition, though pieces of the Old Testament are used regularly (mostly at Vespers). I'll have to do some digging to see which books of the deuterocanon are used in readings.
      Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. – St. John Chrysostom

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      • #4
        It looks like mostly just the Wisdom of Solomon (the Prayer of Azariah from the Greek additions to Daniel is used on the Saturday before Easter, and the Prayer of Manasseh is used in Great Compline during Lent).
        Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. – St. John Chrysostom

        Veritas vos Liberabit<>< Learn Greek <>< Look here for an Orthodox Church in America<><Ancient Faith Radio
        sigpic
        I recommend you do not try too hard and ...research as little as possible. Such weighty things give me a headache. - Shunyadragon, Baha'i apologist

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        • #5
          So I am going to necro this thread. The best place to get started if you want to read them would be to purchase a copy of the 72 book translation. I have a Douay Rheims and if you're good with Elizabethan than Douay Rheims is perfect. For a little more modern try the RSV with the Apocrypha Or the NAB. The price is roughly 10-15 and you can get the notes. I just was rereading Tobit. Tobit is interesting because of the introduction of the angel Raphael, the exorcism via sacrificed animal parts the names of mystical beings and the wisdom from family line to family line. I am trying myself to read this and study it right now. It makes some reference s and comparison to Job. Since my time is short for myself I am trying to figure out why its considered inaccurate by protestants or inconsistent. It reiterates a great deal of Jewish living and later Christian living. OK. That's all my thoughts at least on Tobit for now.
          A happy family is but an earlier heaven.
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          • #6
            That's not very helpful. So start with Tobit then, let's add the similar Judith. The wisdom books of the Protestant Apocrypha (the books Roman Catholics DO NOT call Apocrypha) are Sirach (or Ecclesiasticus, not to be confused with Ecclesiastes of the Tanach) and well, Wisdom. That's four so far. "Our" next pair is simply First Maccabees and Second Maccabees. Then seven would be Baruch, a follow-on to Jeremiah. Thereafter things get messy, what with the additions to Daniel and the additions to Esther.
            Also messy is what Anglicans (Episcopalians in the U. S.) consider Apocrypha. They also include I Esdras and II Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh and the Letter of Jeremiah (Baruch ch. 6, not in Catholic bibles). Eastern Orthodox also "mess" things up, but generally similar to Roman Catholics and Anglicans.
            Near the Peoples' Republic of Davis, south of the State of Jefferson (Suspended between Left and Right)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Adam View Post
              That's not very helpful. So start with Tobit then, let's add the similar Judith. The wisdom books of the Protestant Apocrypha (the books Roman Catholics DO NOT call Apocrypha) are Sirach (or Ecclesiasticus, not to be confused with Ecclesiastes of the Tanach) and well, Wisdom. That's four so far. "Our" next pair is simply First Maccabees and Second Maccabees. Then seven would be Baruch, a follow-on to Jeremiah. Thereafter things get messy, what with the additions to Daniel and the additions to Esther.
              Also messy is what Anglicans (Episcopalians in the U. S.) consider Apocrypha. They also include I Esdras and II Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh and the Letter of Jeremiah (Baruch ch. 6, not in Catholic bibles). Eastern Orthodox also "mess" things up, but generally similar to Roman Catholics and Anglicans.
              I am not sure what your point is. I started with one book. I also have a life outside of tweb that consists of being a wife and raising children. I don't post much here because of some things I am dealing with. I started with a minor analysis of Tobit because I had just read it, and also advised the OP to pick up a specific translation to help. I am not really sure what your issue is with it. The Deuterocanon or the extra 7, and then there is the Catholic Apocrypha. The Deuterocanon is just the easiest place to start because its whats most agreed on. A Catholic translation would have some notes and insights. The Catholic Bible Contains Sirach, Wisdom, 1 and 2 Maccabees, Tobit, Judith, Baruch, and Ecclesiasticus. The Vulgate adds Manessah and Esdras. EO has Manessah the Esdras, 3 and 4 Maccabees Letter of Jeremiah, Additions to Daniel and Esther plus 7. The RCC translation is just the easiest.
              In time when I am able I can closer analyze some of the other books. I do know the Deuterocanon was included in the Greek Jewish Scriptures.
              A happy family is but an earlier heaven.
              George Bernard Shaw

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              • #8
                You still are unhelpful. I gave seven main RC "additions" to the Tanakh. You gave eight by double-counting Sirach and Ecclesiasticus, the same book. Then you failed to admit that the Roman Catholic canon also includes the additions to Daniel and Esther. To further confuse the issue, there is also the Epistle to Jeremy which is printed in Catholic Bibles (and thus not separately counted) as Ch. 6 of Baruch. Their are other books called officially Apocrypha by Anglicans and the Eastern Orthodox, but I would think you could at least keep straight what pertains to "Catholicity"!
                Near the Peoples' Republic of Davis, south of the State of Jefferson (Suspended between Left and Right)

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