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Explain to me Martin Luther

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  • Explain to me Martin Luther

    Sure, I've read books about him, but how would you say he has impacted your view of Christianity, if at all.

    What's your favorite Luther quote?

    What's your favorite resource or work on him?
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

  • #2
    Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
    Sure, I've read books about him, but how would you say he has impacted your view of Christianity, if at all.

    What's your favorite Luther quote?

    What's your favorite resource or work on him?
    For me, the biggest impact was one of the better pastors I have know was a Missouri Synod Lutheran. Other than that, no real direct impact - besides being a Protestant.
    "For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." Hosea 6:6

    "Theology can be an intellectual entertainment." Metropolitan Anthony Bloom

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    • #3
      You should not believe your conscience and your feelings more than the word which the Lord who receives sinners preaches to you.


      Faith must trample under foot all reason, sense, and understanding.


      “Feelings come and feelings go,
      And feelings are deceiving;
      My warrant is the Word of God--
      Naught else is worth believing.

      Though all my heart should feel condemned
      For want of some sweet token,
      There is One greater than my heart
      Whose Word cannot be broken.

      I'll trust in God's unchanging Word
      Till soul and body sever,
      For, though all things shall pass away,
      HIS WORD SHALL STAND FOREVER!”

      I cannot choose but adhere to the word of God, which has possession of my conscience; nor can I possibly, nor will I even make any recantation, since it is neither safe nor honest to act contrary to conscience! Here I stand; I cannot do otherwise, so help me God! Amen.
      And, finally,

      A person who...does not regard music as a marvelous creation of God, must be a clodhopper indeed and does not deserve to be called a human being; he should be permitted to hear nothing but the braying of asses and the grunting of hogs


      Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mossrose View Post
        And, finally,
        A person who...does not regard music as a marvelous creation of God, must be a clodhopper indeed and does not deserve to be called a human being; he should be permitted to hear nothing but the braying of asses and the grunting of hogs
        So he's familiar with my singing I see.

        I'm always still in trouble again

        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

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        • #5
          He didn't say anything about those who can't carry a tune in a bucket. He was referring to those who don't think music is a marvelous creation of God.



          Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mossrose View Post
            He didn't say anything about those who can't carry a tune in a bucket. He was referring to those who don't think music is a marvelous creation of God.

            If he heard me sing he would've had second thought about music being a marvelous creation and possibly even that it came from God.

            I'm always still in trouble again

            "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
            "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
              If he heard me sing he would've had second thought about music being a marvelous creation and possibly even that it came from God.
              No.


              Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

              Comment


              • #8
                Umm maybe the hymn "A Mighty Fortress is Our God" and "Away in a Manger." I think Luther was really able to vocalize the need for acceptance of Grace and the need for Christians to have Faith. I also think he made an impact in giving Christianity a new dimension. He was more vocal and needed to be about the wrongdoing of the accepted church of the time. (I think Emeritus was also calling for similar reforms.) Sadly it went over political but he had the right ideas....
                A happy family is but an earlier heaven.
                George Bernard Shaw

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Martin Luther
                  Faith must trample under foot all reason, sense, and understanding.
                  Does anyone know where this is from and what the context is? Its not an uncommon thing to find in his writings.

                  Originally posted by Martin Luther Werke, VIII
                  All the articles of our Christian faith, which God has revealed to us in His Word, are in presence of reason sheerly impossible, absurd, and false.
                  Originally posted by Martin Luther Table Talk
                  [That] Reason in no way contributes to faith. [...] For reason is the greatest enemy that faith has; it never comes to the aid of spiritual things.
                  I know that Martin Luther has a tendency to engage in, what we at least today find to be, very odious hyperbolic rhetoric. Most of the time that explains his statements. I'd be very surprised to learn that Martin Luther actually believed that there was a conflict between reason and faith.

                  However it seems clear that he was against any attempts at using metaphysics to understand the articles of faith.
                  Last edited by Leonhard; 05-29-2014, 06:41 AM.

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                  • #10
                    He was a contrarian who got excommunicated, then , out of pure avarice to the church, purposely developed a theology where the Pope was the antichrist. He was also an extremely strong advocate of the divine right of kings, and, as such, the reformation was used only as a tool, for the kings and princes to push away the influence o of the church, the only thing keeping them in check, which allowed them to have absolute power over church and state and viciously oppress their people.

                    Why he is revered, I have no idea. His "reformation" was so bad, even he, himself, had regretted what he had done.
                    Last edited by TimelessTheist; 05-29-2014, 07:54 AM.
                    Better to illuminate than merely to shine, to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate.

                    -Thomas Aquinas

                    I love to travel, But hate to arrive.

                    -Hernando Cortez

                    What is the good of experience if you do not reflect?

                    -Frederick 2, Holy Roman Emperor

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TimelessTheist View Post
                      He was a contrarian who got excommunicated, then , out of pure avarice to the church, purposely developed a theology where the Pope was the antichrist. He was also an extremely strong advocate of the divine right of kings, and, as such, the reformation was used only as a tool, for the kings and princes to push away the influence o of the church, the only thing keeping them in check, which allowed them to have absolute power over church and state and viciously oppress their people.

                      Why he is revered, I have no idea. His "reformation" was so bad, even he, himself, had regretted what he had done.
                      To be fair, it's not has if the Church itself was immune from the very same failings of the governments that you speak of. I'm no great fan of Luther's exegesis of Paul, or the outcome of state churches, but I agree with most of his criticisms of some of the practices of the church of his time.
                      Last edited by robrecht; 05-29-2014, 08:29 AM.
                      βλέπομεν γὰρ ἄρτι δι᾿ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι, τότε δὲ πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον·
                      ἄρτι γινώσκω ἐκ μέρους, τότε δὲ ἐπιγνώσομαι καθὼς καὶ ἐπεγνώσθην.

                      אָכֵ֕ן אַתָּ֖ה אֵ֣ל מִסְתַּתֵּ֑ר אֱלֹהֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵ֖ל מוֹשִֽׁיעַ׃

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by robrecht View Post
                        To be fair, it's not has if the Church itself was immune from the very same failings of the governments that you speak of. I'm no great fan of Luther's exegesis of Paul, or the outcome of state churches, but I agree with most of his criticisms of some of the practices of the church of his time.
                        I'm not so sure. His critism of the sale of indulgences was unfounded, as that was a practice that the Church did many times in the past as well, to fund projects such as cathedrals and the Crusades, although I agree that many people loweron the rung did abuse the system, however, if you actually know what an indulgence actually does, the proposition that people can "buy forgiveness" is clearly unfounded.
                        Better to illuminate than merely to shine, to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate.

                        -Thomas Aquinas

                        I love to travel, But hate to arrive.

                        -Hernando Cortez

                        What is the good of experience if you do not reflect?

                        -Frederick 2, Holy Roman Emperor

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I recently read a book that argued that Luther suffered from a severe form of OCD, which places an interesting context for his exegesis of Paul and makes it understandable why he would have embraced those insights to the degree he did.
                          "I am not angered that the Moral Majority boys campaign against abortion. I am angry when the same men who say, "Save OUR children" bellow "Build more and bigger bombers." That's right! Blast the children in other nations into eternity, or limbless misery as they lay crippled from "OUR" bombers! This does not jell." - Leonard Ravenhill

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                          • #14
                            Luther's contribution to Christianity is immeasurable, in spite of his humanity and fallibility. After all, none of the popes have been perfect.

                            He brought us out of the dark age of salvation by works into the new light of salvation by faith alone.


                            Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mossrose View Post
                              Luther's contribution to Christianity is immeasurable, in spite of his humanity and fallibility. After all, none of the popes have been perfect.

                              He brought us out of the dark age of salvation by works into the new light of salvation by faith alone.
                              But why did he add the word 'alone' to the text of Paul?
                              βλέπομεν γὰρ ἄρτι δι᾿ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι, τότε δὲ πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον·
                              ἄρτι γινώσκω ἐκ μέρους, τότε δὲ ἐπιγνώσομαι καθὼς καὶ ἐπεγνώσθην.

                              אָכֵ֕ן אַתָּ֖ה אֵ֣ל מִסְתַּתֵּ֑ר אֱלֹהֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵ֖ל מוֹשִֽׁיעַ׃

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