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Proverbs 14:30, LXX

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  • Proverbs 14:30, LXX

    14:30 A meek-spirited man is a healer of the heart: but a sensitive heart is a corruption of the bones.

    I think I understand the last part, but I don't want to presume that I understand the second part. I doubt that word "sensitive" being used there is the same word "sensitive" that we uses nowadays. Again, this is the LXX, not the Hebrew? Any insights onto the matter?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Just Some Dude View Post
    14:30 A meek-spirited man is a healer of the heart: but a sensitive heart is a corruption of the bones.

    I think I understand the last part, but I don't want to presume that I understand the second part. I doubt that word "sensitive" being used there is the same word "sensitive" that we uses nowadays. Again, this is the LXX, not the Hebrew? Any insights onto the matter?
    When you wrote "the last part", did you mean "the first part"?

    Proverbs 14:30 LXX: πραΰθυμος ἀνὴρ καρδίας ἰατρός σὴς δὲ ὀστέων καρδία αἰσθητική (NETS: A meek–spirited man is a healer of hearts, and a sensitive heart a moth [i.e., a cause of decay] in the bones.

    The word rendered "sensitive" in A New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS) is the feminine form of αἰσθητικός, the entry for which in LSJ is
    αἰσθ-ητικός, -ή, -όν, of or for sense-perception, sensitive, perceptive, Pl.Ti.67a, etc.; ζῷα-κώτερα Thphr.Sens.29; αἰ. ἀναθυμίασις, of the soul, Zeno Stoic.1.39; τὸ αἰ. [τῆς ψυχῆς. Diog.Oen.Fr.39; ζωὴ αἰ. Arist.EN1098a2; quick, γραῦς Alex.65. Adv. αἰσθητικῶς, ἔχειν to be quick of perception, Arist.EE1230b37; κινεῖσθαι Arr.Epict.1.14.7, S.E.M.7.356; αἰ. ἔχειν ἑαυτοῦ, c. part., to be conscious of oneself doing, Ael.VH14.23; αἰ. γιγνώσκειν Procl.in Prm.p.754 S.

    The word αἰσθητικός occurs no where else in the LXX but Proverbs 14:10 & 30. Here is the former:
    14:10 LXX: καρδία ἀνδρὸς αἰσθητική λυπηρὰ ψυχὴ αὐτοῦ ὅταν δὲ εὐφραίνηται οὐκ ἐπιμείγνυται ὕβρει (NETS: The heart knows its own bitterness, and no stranger shares its joy.

    Waltke considers 14:29-30 to semantically connected. Here is his translation and commentary re the connection in The Book of Proverbs Chapters 1-15 (NICNT: Eerdmans, 2004) via Accordance:
    29 Patience is great competence,
    but a quick temper is that which exalts folly.
    30 Life in the entire body is a calm heart,
    but hot passion is rot in the bones.

    29–30 Verse 29 characterizes the patient versus the impatient, and v. 30 escalates the consequences of understanding and folly to matters of life and death (v. 30). This semantic connection is supported by references to physiognomy, but v. 29 speaks of a person’s outward physiognomy, a relaxed face (= “patience”) versus “short breath” (= “impatience”), and v. 30 of the inward counterpart, a “calm heart” versus “rot in the bones.” Brongers links the proverbial pair by making “calmness” and “patience” parallels, and “impatience” and “hot passions” parallels.

    Here is Waltke's comment re verse 30:
    30 The second of the proverb pair escalates the physiognomy of patience to its inner calm and tranquil disposition. Serenity will preserve the disciple’s life, but irritation will kill him. A calm (II marpēʾ, not I marpēʾ [= “remedy”; see 4:22] according to HALOT) heart (see p. 90–92) is life (see p. 104–107), which here refers to clinical life, the principle of animation, in contrast to physical death, as shown by the qualifier in the entire body (bᵉśārı̂m; see 4:22; 5:11). The unique plural bᵉśārı̂m denotes “the bodily life in the totality of its functions, and in the entire manifoldness of its relations.” [Delitzsch, Proverbs] But hot passion (qinʾâ, see 3:31) is rot in the bones (rᵉqab ʿᵃṣāmôt), a condition that deteriorates to ruin and death (see 12:4). Whereas in 12:4 “bone” is singular, here it is plural, matching “flesh.” “The entire body” and “bones” are a broken, stereotyped phrase that refers to both the material and psycho-spiritual aspects of human nature. Inward excitation, a resentful mind, which cares only for itself and which gets worked up, is like bone cancer that rots the most firm components of the body and shortens a person’s life (cf. Sir. 30:24).

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    • #3
      Yes, that was a typo. Thanks.

      So you're that "excitable, "impatient," or some other synonym is a better translation than "sensitive" there. Strange, but oh well. Thank you very much.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Just Some Dude View Post
        Yes, that was a typo. Thanks.

        So you're that "excitable, "impatient," or some other synonym is a better translation than "sensitive" there. Strange, but oh well. Thank you very much.
        I also like Young's Literal Translation:
        [30]*A healed heart is life to the flesh, And rottenness to the bones is envy.

        And Darby:
        [30]*A sound* heart is the life of the flesh; but envy the rottenness of the bones.
        "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

        Comment


        • #5
          This thread is for the Greek LXX though, not for the Hebrew. (Unless there's something else I'm missing >.>). Thanks anyways.

          Comment

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