Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Merry Christmas!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Merry Christmas!

    Merry Christmas to all my Christian friends as they celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, the son of God, and their Lord and Savior. May your day be filled with joy!

  • #2
    Merry Christmas

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

    Comment


    • #3
      Merry Christmas!
      If it weren't for the Resurrection of Jesus, we'd all be in DEEP TROUBLE!

      Comment


      • #4
        Merry Christmas!

        Comment


        • #5
          Christmas Baubles.jpg
          1Cor 15:34 εκνηψατε δικαιως και μη αμαρτανετε αγνωσιαν γαρ θεου τινες εχουσιν προς εντροπην υμιν λεγω
          "It's bigger inside" might work for a TARDIS - it doesn't work for a bronze sea.

          Comment


          • #6
            The Christmas Truce
            .
            Just after midnight on Christmas morning, the majority of German troops engaged in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery and commence to sing Christmas carols. At certain points along the eastern and western fronts, the soldiers of Russia, France, and Britain even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

            At the first light of dawn, many of the German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

            And with that I’m going to thank all of the thoughtful and not so thoughtful posters over the last year who nevertheless made me more thoughtful and even those who didn’t … yet. With lectures to prepare and online courses to build and launch, I’ll be on hiatus for the next few weeks. So Merry Christmas to all, and a happy and healthy New Year!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
              The Christmas Truce
              .
              Just after midnight on Christmas morning, the majority of German troops engaged in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery and commence to sing Christmas carols. At certain points along the eastern and western fronts, the soldiers of Russia, France, and Britain even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

              At the first light of dawn, many of the German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

              And with that I’m going to thank all of the thoughtful and not so thoughtful posters over the last year who nevertheless made me more thoughtful and even those who didn’t … yet. With lectures to prepare and online courses to build and launch, I’ll be on hiatus for the next few weeks. So Merry Christmas to all, and a happy and healthy New Year!
              I wasn't familiar with it taking place on the Eastern Front as well.

              FWIU, several historians doubt the veracity of the soccer matches due largely to the condition of the ground between the trenches and the likely lack of a suitable ball. Still, even these guys figure there was some truth to the stories and figure they evolved out of what were called "kick about" matches using things like tin cans.

              And the brass was very displeased over this and subsequently both sides banned such cease fires.

              I'm always still in trouble again

              "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
              "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
              "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

              Comment


              • #8
                Christ has come!

                Christ will come again!


                Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                  The Christmas Truce
                  .
                  Just after midnight on Christmas morning, the majority of German troops engaged in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery and commence to sing Christmas carols. At certain points along the eastern and western fronts, the soldiers of Russia, France, and Britain even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

                  At the first light of dawn, many of the German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

                  And with that I’m going to thank all of the thoughtful and not so thoughtful posters over the last year who nevertheless made me more thoughtful and even those who didn’t … yet. With lectures to prepare and online courses to build and launch, I’ll be on hiatus for the next few weeks. So Merry Christmas to all, and a happy and healthy New Year!
                  And a tribute to that by Celtic Thunder...

                  The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have a cool Yule and a Frantic First!
                    When I Survey....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Merry Christmas Juvenal! And everyone else too! After missing spending Christmas with family and friends last year, this year is special. I hope everyone has been able to spend it with family and friends!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Merry Christmas, Jesse.
                        Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. St. John Chrysostom

                        Veritas vos Liberabit<>< Learn Greek <>< Look here for an Orthodox Church in America<><Ancient Faith Radio
                        sigpic
                        I recommend you do not try too hard and ...research as little as possible. Such weighty things give me a headache. - Shunyadragon, Baha'i apologist

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                          The Christmas Truce
                          .
                          Just after midnight on Christmas morning, the majority of German troops engaged in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery and commence to sing Christmas carols. At certain points along the eastern and western fronts, the soldiers of Russia, France, and Britain even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

                          At the first light of dawn, many of the German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

                          And with that I’m going to thank all of the thoughtful and not so thoughtful posters over the last year who nevertheless made me more thoughtful and even those who didn’t … yet. With lectures to prepare and online courses to build and launch, I’ll be on hiatus for the next few weeks. So Merry Christmas to all, and a happy and healthy New Year!
                          Some more on this...

                          Peace for a day: How soccer brought a brief truce to World War I on Christmas Day 1914

                          soccer.png

                          The first Christmas of World War I was a hellish time for Alfred Dougan Chater, a second lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders, who woke that morning in a freezing, muddy trench less than 100 yards from the German lines in West Flanders, Belgium.

                          It was 1914 and the bloodiest fighting of the still-young conflict had ended in a stalemate. Corpses littered the deadly “No Man’s Land” separating the two sides along the Western Front, where hope had long since given way to despair and disillusionment.

                          So what Chater saw next, he wrote his mother, was “one of the most extraordinary sights that anyone has ever seen.”

                          All along a 20-mile stretch of the Western Front, unarmed German troops began climbing over the parapets and walking toward the British side simply to shake hands and exchange greetings, the first tentative steps toward what is likely the largest spontaneous Christmas truce in modern history, one in which the warring armies shared cigars, good cheer, chocolate and, in more than one place, a game of soccer.

                          “It absolutely did happen,” said Terri Blom Crocker, author of “The Christmas Truce,” among the most authoritative books on the subject. Some of the men, she said, came out “the night before, some the morning of, some the afternoon of Christmas. Nobody pre-arranged anything.”

                          The truce, Crocker said, ranged from soldiers shouting across the pockmarked battlefield pledging not to shoot if the other side promised the same to “full-fledged let’s go out and fraternize and maybe even play a little football.”
                          “No referee; we didn’t need a referee for that kind of game. ... There was no score, no tally at all — it was simply a melee.”

                          ERNIE WILLIAMS, WHO WAS A 19-YEAR-OLD PRIVATE WITH THE 6TH CHESHIRES IN DECEMBER 1914

                          More than a century later the truce and its spontaneous example of humanity and decency in the darkest of times continue to inspire, which is why the incident remains a subject of both study and curiosity. Failed, cowardly leadership had brought the world to war, but a simple child’s game brought the two sides to peace — for a few hours at least.

                          In one of a series of interviews the Imperial War Museum conducted with veterans long after the conflict, Ernie Williams, a 19-year-old private with the 6th Battalion Cheshire Regiment, said he was near Ypres, on the northern end of the front, when “from somewhere, somehow, this football appeared.”

                          He continued the story with Peter Hart for his book “Fire and Movement: The British Expeditionary Force and the Campaign of 1914.”


                          The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                          Comment

                          Related Threads

                          Collapse

                          Topics Statistics Last Post
                          Started by Cow Poke, 05-24-2022, 05:53 PM
                          4 responses
                          37 views
                          0 likes
                          Last Post rogue06
                          by rogue06
                           
                          Started by Sparko, 05-23-2022, 07:34 AM
                          10 responses
                          30 views
                          0 likes
                          Last Post Sparko
                          by Sparko
                           
                          Started by mossrose, 05-19-2022, 03:21 PM
                          64 responses
                          145 views
                          0 likes
                          Last Post rogue06
                          by rogue06
                           
                          Started by Cow Poke, 02-26-2022, 04:45 PM
                          23 responses
                          129 views
                          0 likes
                          Last Post Ana Dragule  
                          Started by rogue06, 12-24-2021, 08:52 AM
                          61 responses
                          216 views
                          2 likes
                          Last Post rogue06
                          by rogue06
                           
                          Working...
                          X