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Windows 11 leaked

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  • #31
    I just tried twice to install it in a VM on Mr. mossy's 9 1/2 year old W7 computer, which is the most powerful one we've got. Both times the installer stopped saying that it doesn't meet the system requirements, so short of eventually getting a new computer we've got no way to see it in action. So much for trying to see whether my game will work with it, at least for now.
    ~ Russell ("MelMak")

    "[Sing] and [make] melody in your heart to the Lord." -- Ephesians 5:19b

    Fight_spam!

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    • #32
      Originally posted by The Melody Maker View Post
      I just tried twice to install it in a VM on Mr. mossy's 9 1/2 year old W7 computer, which is the most powerful one we've got. Both times the installer stopped saying that it doesn't meet the system requirements, so short of eventually getting a new computer we've got no way to see it in action. So much for trying to see whether my game will work with it, at least for now.
      Have the said anything at all yet about the "end of life" of Win10?
      The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

        Have the said anything at all yet about the "end of life" of Win10?
        It looks like Windows 10 will still be supported through October 14, 2025. But I already know my game works with 10, because I had to make a minor fix to it 6 years ago after 10 was released -- so it works with everything from 95 up to 10.

        It's just 11 I'm in the dark about right now.
        ~ Russell ("MelMak")

        "[Sing] and [make] melody in your heart to the Lord." -- Ephesians 5:19b

        Fight_spam!

        Comment


        • #34
          I did a bit of research and found out that a few people out there somehow managed to get Windows 11 installed on older unsupported hardware by way of editing the registry (or some other such thing) to bypass the system requirement check, so I'm going to try it again.

          I also found the page to download the official retail release which will be helpful, since I've only tried the release preview. Here's where to get it now, in case anyone's interested:
          https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows11
          ~ Russell ("MelMak")

          "[Sing] and [make] melody in your heart to the Lord." -- Ephesians 5:19b

          Fight_spam!

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by The Melody Maker View Post
            I just tried twice to install it in a VM on Mr. mossy's 9 1/2 year old W7 computer, which is the most powerful one we've got. Both times the installer stopped saying that it doesn't meet the system requirements, so short of eventually getting a new computer we've got no way to see it in action. So much for trying to see whether my game will work with it, at least for now.
            Well unless you have a directx 12 graphics card (and the VM can emulate it) and a UEFI bios that the VM can also emulate, you can't put W11 on a virtual machine. I think Microsoft is making a big mistake requiring such high standards for W11. One of W10's biggest selling points was that it could be installed on almost anything.

            Requirements:
            Processor 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with 2 or more cores on a compatible 64-bit processor or System on a Chip (SoC)
            Memory 4 GB RAM
            Storage 64 GB or larger storage device
            System firmware UEFI, Secure Boot capable
            TPM Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0
            Graphics card DirectX 12 compatible graphics / WDDM 2.x
            Display >9” with HD Resolution (720p)
            Internet connection Microsoft account and internet connectivity required for setup for Windows 11 Home

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            • #36
              LOL. so apparently Microsoft has release it's own instructions on how to install W11 on incompatible hardware.

              https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...9-ef0a331518f1


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              • #37
                Originally posted by Sparko View Post
                I will probably wait a few months before upgrading to windows 11 on my laptop, depending on what the response is from the early adopters. On my desktop computers, I would need to buy new graphics card in order to run W11 and right now the graphics card prices are WAY overpriced because of cryptomining and chip shortages because of COVID. A $400 card goes for around $800-$1200 right now. It's crazy.
                Gotta friend with his car sitting in a mechanic's shop since the first part of the month waiting for a certain computer chip to become available that isn't due to supply chain problems.

                I'm always still in trouble again

                "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Sparko View Post

                  Well unless you have a directx 12 graphics card (and the VM can emulate it) and a UEFI bios that the VM can also emulate, you can't put W11 on a virtual machine. I think Microsoft is making a big mistake requiring such high standards for W11. One of W10's biggest selling points was that it could be installed on almost anything.
                  After researching last night, I found out that with a clean install the command prompt can be opened up at setup's initial screen with Shift+10, and from there the registry editor (RegEdit) can be opened up into which a couple of DWORD variables can be added to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig key called BypassSecureBootCheck and BypassTPMCheck with values of 1 -- and that will cause setup to totally bypass the checks for secure boot and TPM.

                  It didn't make a difference in my case, because my own desktop's graphics card is DirectX 11 -- and Mr. mossy's is DirectX 10.1, so it probably wouldn't work with his either for that reason.

                  However, I still have a couple of ideas up my sleeve. I found out that it's possible to take a Windows 10 ISO, delete the contents of the "sources" folder and replace it with the "sources" folder from the Windows 11 ISO -- and then setup will bypass all the system requirements checks and think it's installing 10 though it's really installing 11. I have yet to try it and probably won't have a chance until later this week, but I'll get back to you guys on how that works out.

                  And if even that doesn't work, I might just give up trying to clean install 11 and instead install 10 first and then try upgrading it to 11 from there.


                  You guys can tell I don't give up easily on this kind of stuff.
                  ~ Russell ("MelMak")

                  "[Sing] and [make] melody in your heart to the Lord." -- Ephesians 5:19b

                  Fight_spam!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by The Melody Maker View Post

                    After researching last night, I found out that with a clean install the command prompt can be opened up at setup's initial screen with Shift+10, and from there the registry editor (RegEdit) can be opened up into which a couple of DWORD variables can be added to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig key called BypassSecureBootCheck and BypassTPMCheck with values of 1 -- and that will cause setup to totally bypass the checks for secure boot and TPM.

                    It didn't make a difference in my case, because my own desktop's graphics card is DirectX 11 -- and Mr. mossy's is DirectX 10.1, so it probably wouldn't work with his either for that reason.

                    However, I still have a couple of ideas up my sleeve. I found out that it's possible to take a Windows 10 ISO, delete the contents of the "sources" folder and replace it with the "sources" folder from the Windows 11 ISO -- and then setup will bypass all the system requirements checks and think it's installing 10 though it's really installing 11. I have yet to try it and probably won't have a chance until later this week, but I'll get back to you guys on how that works out.

                    And if even that doesn't work, I might just give up trying to clean install 11 and instead install 10 first and then try upgrading it to 11 from there.


                    You guys can tell I don't give up easily on this kind of stuff.
                    Reading the microsoft page I linked above It looks like on the release version, you can just tell it to go ahead and install on your hardware even if it doesn't meet the requirement and it will do it, with the caveat that it might not work correctly.


                    --
                    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...9-ef0a331518f1

                    Installing Windows 11 on devices that don't meet minimum system requirements


                    Windows 11


                    Note: For more info about the minimum system requirements for Windows 11, see Windows 11 specs, features, and computer requirements.



                    Installing Windows 11 on a device that does not meet Windows 11 minimum system requirements is not recommended. If you choose to install Windows 11 on ineligible hardware, you should be comfortable assuming the risk of running into compatibility issues.

                    Your device might malfunction due to these compatibility or other issues. Devices that do not meet these system requirements will no longer be guaranteed to receive updates, including but not limited to security updates.

                    The following disclaimer applies if you install Windows 11 on a device that doesn't meet the minimum system requirements:

                    This PC doesn't meet the minimum system requirements for running Windows 11 - these requirements help ensure a more reliable and higher quality experience. Installing Windows 11 on this PC is not recommended and may result in compatibility issues. If you proceed with installing Windows 11, your PC will no longer be supported and won't be entitled to receive updates. Damages to your PC due to lack of compatibility aren't covered under the manufacturer warranty.
                    Before you install Windows 11


                    If you are unsure if your device meets the Windows 11 minimum system requirements and have Windows 10 already installed, you can download the PC Health Check app, which will assess eligibility and identify components of your device that don't meet the minimum requirements. The app will also link to info that details steps you can take to make your device meet the minimum system requirements. To learn more, download and install PC Health Check app.
                    After you install Windows 11


                    If you're experiencing issues after upgrading to Windows 11 and your device does not meet the minimum system requirements, we recommend you go back to Windows 10. Select Start > Settings > System > Recovery > Go back.

                    This option is only available for 10 days following your upgrade, after which time the files needed to perform this function will be removed to free up disk space on your device.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by The Melody Maker View Post

                      After researching last night, I found out that with a clean install the command prompt can be opened up at setup's initial screen with Shift+10, and from there the registry editor (RegEdit) can be opened up into which a couple of DWORD variables can be added to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig key called BypassSecureBootCheck and BypassTPMCheck with values of 1 -- and that will cause setup to totally bypass the checks for secure boot and TPM.

                      It didn't make a difference in my case, because my own desktop's graphics card is DirectX 11 -- and Mr. mossy's is DirectX 10.1, so it probably wouldn't work with his either for that reason.

                      However, I still have a couple of ideas up my sleeve. I found out that it's possible to take a Windows 10 ISO, delete the contents of the "sources" folder and replace it with the "sources" folder from the Windows 11 ISO -- and then setup will bypass all the system requirements checks and think it's installing 10 though it's really installing 11. I have yet to try it and probably won't have a chance until later this week, but I'll get back to you guys on how that works out.

                      And if even that doesn't work, I might just give up trying to clean install 11 and instead install 10 first and then try upgrading it to 11 from there.


                      You guys can tell I don't give up easily on this kind of stuff.
                      It was SO MUCH easier 'back in the day' when I could take any obsolete piece of left over computer, install Linux on it, and have a fast and capable machine!
                      The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                        It was SO MUCH easier 'back in the day' when I could take any obsolete piece of left over computer, install Linux on it, and have a fast and capable machine!
                        That's what I did with an old laptop from about 2005-2007. I actually did install windows 10 on it and it worked "ok" but was pretty slow. I decided to play around with Linux and installed Ubuntu 20.10 on it. It runs a lot faster now.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Sparko View Post

                          That's what I did with an old laptop from about 2005-2007. I actually did install windows 10 on it and it worked "ok" but was pretty slow. I decided to play around with Linux and installed Ubuntu 20.10 on it. It runs a lot faster now.
                          I haven't messed with Linux in years, but I used to turn the junkiest lowest-capacity computers into routers, bridges, and all kinds of things before those devices became so cheap themselves.
                          The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                            I haven't messed with Linux in years, but I used to turn the junkiest lowest-capacity computers into routers, bridges, and all kinds of things before those devices became so cheap themselves.
                            Well Theologyweb runs on linux, so I had to relearn it in order to update our software. I actually learned on Unix, back in the day, but they are very similar. I also got a Raspberry Pi for Christmas a few years ago and it runs Linux too so I have been playing with that. I found a project online called Retro Pie, that turns the Raspberry Pi into an arcade emulator. So that was fun. You can download all the old arcade roms from Archive.org.

                            Ubuntu and Debian seem to be the most user friendly versions of Linux out there. They each have built in windows-like interfaces. And you can even install them on a flash drive then do a dual boot thing. You can tell your PC to boot from the flash drive and it will boot into linux so you can have both windows and linux. I actually installed the retro pie software on a ubuntu flash drive and added some roms and now I basically have an arcade machine on a keychain flash drive.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
                              I haven't messed with Linux in years, but I used to turn the junkiest lowest-capacity computers into routers, bridges, and all kinds of things before those devices became so cheap themselves.
                              Does Linux still carry his security blanket with him everywhere he goes?

                              I'm always still in trouble again

                              "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                              "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                              "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                                Does Linux still carry his security blanket with him everywhere he goes?
                                Yes. And his sister Lucix still pulls away the football from Charlex.

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