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Congratulations! You've won a valuable prize! About hackers, scammers and deceptions.

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  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by QuantaFille View Post

    I don't know about the UK, but over here, the official sites for that kind of thing vary by state, but ALWAYS end in ".gov".
    I can't remember what that false link to our UK DVLC looked like now, but it sure looked good!

    Leave a comment:


  • QuantaFille
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post

    Ouch! What a very unhappy set of circumstances and a more-than-usually anxious person..........

    I very nearly got scammed a couple of years ago when I needed to re-tax my motor scooter at the Driver, Vehicle & Licence Authority's website. After clicking on 'DVLA' I found what looked like an official website, entered it and entered all my details, but was saved from giving my card details because to license an electric power scooter is free of charge, we just have to go through the same procedure as other vehicle owners, and so when I was asked for an 80 payment I knew that this couldn't be right. But somebody somewhere knows a bit more about me!
    I don't know about the UK, but over here, the official sites for that kind of thing vary by state, but ALWAYS end in ".gov".

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparko
    replied
    Note to everyone: Please do not post any actual links or email addresses if you are copying a scam email you have gotten. We don't want someone accidentally or stupidly on-purpose click on anything that could harm their computers.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post
    My daughter got married 2 weeks ago. You guys know here I work in the Intelligence Community and have for quite some time. I train all of my family members, but sometimes it simply isn't enough to beat the crafty scammers. My mother in-law had ran over a pretty sizeable tree limb in their truck the night before the wedding, as she returned home from the rehearsal. She's 81. She called her insurance to get a rental for the wedding the morning of. They told her she didn't have rental coverage and that she can just get a pretty inexpensive car from one of the major carriers through their web site. Well, she's 81... so she took to Google. She called an 855 number on one of the ads at the top and the "enterprise" rep gave her another number to call for their "same day" rentals. She was already stressed out about getting to the wedding of her granddaughter, seeing her family that she hasn't seen in over 5 years, dealing with my cantankerous 86 year old FIL, and having been the one to damage the truck in the first place. I was not available to help her because of the wedding day happenings, so she followed the instructions of the "Enterprise" guy that only a certain kind of credit card worked, and she could get one from Target. Well, she did all of the things I taught her not to do, and lost $300 USD out of the incident. She ended up driving one of their classic El Caminos to the wedding, so they did make it and enjoyed the ceremony. On Monday, we tried calling the 855 number back, but it rang fast busy (meaning it was spoofed or abandoned). She is still mortified that she allowed herself to get taken by these leeches, but it could have been MUCH worse had they got her actual credit card info instead of the gift card.

    No one is immune to getting taken by these wastes of human flesh. My best advice is to be vigilant and trust no one that calls you. Only use the number that is on their public web site, and always request that you can call them back on the official number to continue to discuss. And look up Pierogi on YouTube to see a scam buster in action. Great content there.
    Ouch! What a very unhappy set of circumstances and a more-than-usually anxious person..........

    I very nearly got scammed a couple of years ago when I needed to re-tax my motor scooter at the Driver, Vehicle & Licence Authority's website. After clicking on 'DVLA' I found what looked like an official website, entered it and entered all my details, but was saved from giving my card details because to license an electric power scooter is free of charge, we just have to go through the same procedure as other vehicle owners, and so when I was asked for an 80 payment I knew that this couldn't be right. But somebody somewhere knows a bit more about me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post
    It never rains but pours!!
    Yesterday evening I also received a call from an 01884- number and on answering, a robot explained that I have been reported to HM Customs/Revenue and that a warranted officer will be coming to arrest me, and that I can discuss this situation immediately by pressing 1 on my keypad. I expect that many call recipients might be tempted to press 1 just to tell any person responding what to do with themselves, but I reckon that any answer wins for the sender because they are probably collecting numbers that reply at all, for sale by the thousand.

    Where a worried person is answering then a trained deception artist might be able to gain a mass of information.
    It's actually 2fold. They use the ones that answer to build a sellable database to other scam robocallers, and those that don't answer at all are used as spoofable numbers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    My daughter got married 2 weeks ago. You guys know here I work in the Intelligence Community and have for quite some time. I train all of my family members, but sometimes it simply isn't enough to beat the crafty scammers. My mother in-law had ran over a pretty sizeable tree limb in their truck the night before the wedding, as she returned home from the rehearsal. She's 81. She called her insurance to get a rental for the wedding the morning of. They told her she didn't have rental coverage and that she can just get a pretty inexpensive car from one of the major carriers through their web site. Well, she's 81... so she took to Google. She called an 855 number on one of the ads at the top and the "enterprise" rep gave her another number to call for their "same day" rentals. She was already stressed out about getting to the wedding of her granddaughter, seeing her family that she hasn't seen in over 5 years, dealing with my cantankerous 86 year old FIL, and having been the one to damage the truck in the first place. I was not available to help her because of the wedding day happenings, so she followed the instructions of the "Enterprise" guy that only a certain kind of credit card worked, and she could get one from Target. Well, she did all of the things I taught her not to do, and lost $300 USD out of the incident. She ended up driving one of their classic El Caminos to the wedding, so they did make it and enjoyed the ceremony. On Monday, we tried calling the 855 number back, but it rang fast busy (meaning it was spoofed or abandoned). She is still mortified that she allowed herself to get taken by these leeches, but it could have been MUCH worse had they got her actual credit card info instead of the gift card.

    No one is immune to getting taken by these wastes of human flesh. My best advice is to be vigilant and trust no one that calls you. Only use the number that is on their public web site, and always request that you can call them back on the official number to continue to discuss. And look up Pierogi on YouTube to see a scam buster in action. Great content there.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Oh what joy!
    Wednesday 5.22 pm

    Hi Peter
    A refund up to 12,000 is unclaimed. Tax was taken from past PPI/Loans and is owed back.
    Click now :
    vsms.io/GB

    ...and then not long after I get this one.......... !

    Wednesday 5.40 pm

    From 'Zone Refund'
    A refund of up to 12,000 is unclaimed. Tax was taken from past PPI//Loans and is owed back.
    Click now:
    vsms.io/GB


    And since I never took out a loan which included the fake 'personal protection insurance' which was supposed to protect from any inability to pay back through sickness, injury etc, this was a sad attempt to get me to click on either of those 'sites'........ the addresses are real so please don't enter either of them.

    Moderated By: Sparko

    I removed your links. Please don't post potentially dangerous links on theologyweb.

    ***If you wish to take issue with this notice DO NOT do so in this thread.***
    Contact the forum moderator or an administrator in Private Message or email instead. If you feel you must publicly complain or whine, please take it to the Padded Room unless told otherwise.

    Last edited by Sparko; 11-20-2023, 02:25 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikewhitney
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post

    Very good fun!
    Thank you.
    I should have shared this one. She does an old woman voice and a Siri imitation.



    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by mikewhitney View Post
    Very good fun!
    Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikewhitney
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    It never rains but pours!!
    Yesterday evening I also received a call from an 01884- number and on answering, a robot explained that I have been reported to HM Customs/Revenue and that a warranted officer will be coming to arrest me, and that I can discuss this situation immediately by pressing 1 on my keypad. I expect that many call recipients might be tempted to press 1 just to tell any person responding what to do with themselves, but I reckon that any answer wins for the sender because they are probably collecting numbers that reply at all, for sale by the thousand.

    Where a worried person is answering then a trained deception artist might be able to gain a mass of information.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    ;
    Update

    Yesterday I received a text message yesterday, from an 07473- number to inform me that:-
    Delivery will be suspended due to missing address details, please resubmit with a new address https://--.--/jgobb

    So many of us shop online now that it's a fairly safe bet that anybody who receives such a message might be worrying about losing a purchased item, and so replies with an address and questions could be responding.

    The sender is probably just 'blanket transmitting' to thousands of blocks of numbers, knowing that a % will be received by a number holder, and where they receive responses with addresses then they've got a saleable item of information, a mobile number with address, and possibly even a name. They could then sell these 'conformed' numbers by the thousands at a low cost for each one to marketing, sales, scamming companies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparko
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post
    In the UK Martin Lewis is a well known money making/saving guru.
    He is featured in 'money' programs each day
    And so this scam could have influenced many unsuspecting folks!

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/othe...3cfefaf90f3f45 56a24ebc99ad7b2509&ei=58
    Martin Lewis issues warning over 'frightening' scam as he demands urgent action
    Martin Lewis is warning Britons that scammers are using AI "deepfake" videos of him to con victims out of money.
    The Money Saving Expert has described the new scam as “frightening” and said lives will be ruined unless big technology firms are stopped from publishing fraudulent content.
    The videos dubbed "deepfakes" are realistic AI-generated clips of people that show them saying or doing things they have not done.
    He warned his Twitter followers about the new scam on Thursday evening.


    And:-

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/othe...1470e19c626e48 84ac972709035a9fbd&ei=18

    Martin Lewis has said he may sue Facebook after a deepfake scam purporting to show him endorsing an investment scheme circulated on the site.

    The video, a “deepfake” which uses existing images and sounds to create convincing but artificial footage of a person, showed the personal finance expert apparently endorsing an investment scheme from Tesla founder and billionaire Elon Musk.

    The founder of Money Saving Expert alerted his followers to the scam on Thursday night and appeared on live television the following morning saying he was “viscerally angry”, adding the video was “going round” on Facebook.
    interesting. Apparently AI is going to be used by scammers to fool people.

    Here is a guy using AI to fool scammers!

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    In the UK Martin Lewis is a well known money making/saving guru.
    He is featured in 'money' programs each day
    And so this scam could have influenced many unsuspecting folks!

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/othe...3cfefaf90f3f45 56a24ebc99ad7b2509&ei=58
    Martin Lewis issues warning over 'frightening' scam as he demands urgent action
    Martin Lewis is warning Britons that scammers are using AI "deepfake" videos of him to con victims out of money.
    The Money Saving Expert has described the new scam as “frightening” and said lives will be ruined unless big technology firms are stopped from publishing fraudulent content.
    The videos dubbed "deepfakes" are realistic AI-generated clips of people that show them saying or doing things they have not done.
    He warned his Twitter followers about the new scam on Thursday evening.


    And:-

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/othe...1470e19c626e48 84ac972709035a9fbd&ei=18

    Martin Lewis has said he may sue Facebook after a deepfake scam purporting to show him endorsing an investment scheme circulated on the site.

    The video, a “deepfake” which uses existing images and sounds to create convincing but artificial footage of a person, showed the personal finance expert apparently endorsing an investment scheme from Tesla founder and billionaire Elon Musk.

    The founder of Money Saving Expert alerted his followers to the scam on Thursday night and appeared on live television the following morning saying he was “viscerally angry”, adding the video was “going round” on Facebook.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Sparko View Post

    Check your spam folder! I am sure some Nigerian Prince wants to send you a million or two!
    Ah....yes. I have won a 178 piece Stanley tool set..... Well, that's cheered me up somewhat!
    I had to click on 'confirm' for details, so I will guess that just clicking confirm can earn the sender money; maybe the sender can sell responding email addresses to others?

    Leave a comment:

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