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Vanderbilt University sociologist says white privilege still exist and riots prove it

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  • #16
    Originally posted by fm93 View Post
    Certainly group trends and statistics are major emphases of sociological study, but TUP makes it sound as if sociology ignores individuals altogether, which I don't believe is a fair assessment. Groups, after all, are ultimately nothing more than the sum of its individual people.
    I'd quibble that it is the average of the individuals. Sociology typically discards radicals unless considering just them as a group.


    Hold on. He talked about making choices, but where did he mention "being white" anywhere? I don't see that. What I do see is that he's saying "people who are white are making everyday choices that effectually lock in white privilege," but that's quite a far cry from "just by being white, you're oppressing people."
    He talked about WHITES making choices, and that white privilege is continued just by whites making those choices. TUP's summary is a bit sensationalist, true, but it is not an inaccurate paraphrase. I also find it pretty disgusting that others like the good Professor seem to think that just because I am white, I somehow lead this charmed life where all I need to do is walk into a place, and everyone is fawning over me to be the first one to serve my every whim. I've lost too much in this life and struggled for far too long for that to be even remotely accurate while I watch minorities get the permanent positions over me even though I can do the job 10 times better. White privilege my pet donkey. /rant

    Sorry, that wasn't directed at you. I just got informed that I lost out on a permanent job here at work because they needed to increase the diversity of the permanent workforce.


    I see. But here, you seem to have missed part of the historical dynamic--things like "black colleges" and "black churches" and "black businesses" exist in large part because historically speaking, people who were black tended to be excluded from the "mainstream" generic colleges, churches and businesses. Many black people think of themselves in that way because years of segregation and discrimination drilled into them the message that skin color mattered to such an extent that those who weren't white were separate.
    So, they choose to continue to hold the present hostage because of something that ended over 50 years ago? I have a serious problem with victim mentalities like that. I have known too many quality people who were not white males to ever entertain such nonsense as "we can't help it", and ""because your grandpa owned my grandpa".

    Interesting. Every liberal I know believes that government welfare ought to only be a temporary fix, and that the ultimate goal is to become self-sufficient as quickly as possible.
    Progressives since Roosevelt have been for "cradle to grave security for the men, women, and children of America". I don't think that's a debatable claim.


    This statement sounds as if a person must choose between one or the other. But surely you agree that that's not the case--rather, what's needed is balance. You don't want to talk so much about groups that you end up overlooking individuals. At the same time, however, you don't want to focus so closely on the individual that you miss what's going on overall with the group. Individual people aren't automatically defined by characteristics of a group that they belong to, but neither do individual people exist in a vacuum.
    Oh, I agree. But, as I said before, too much focus is on the groups right now. We need to help people realize that they are MUCH more than just mindless drones who must tow the "race/party/national origin" group line. A black man need not only look at shopping at a black owned business. A white female need not seek out college clubs that only include white women. If we can all be valued as individuals, and not drones of a category, we are better off. That's all I am saying here.


    Not entirely sure what you're referring to by "love something"--what is being loved?
    The country. If you love the country so much, why would you desire to fundamentally change it? Would you suggest fundamentally changing your wife?



    Okay. I think the issue I had with the rhetoric in that piece is that I see a lot of people acting like black people are all "using racism as an excuse or crutch" for their poor condition.
    Many do. Same with what we call here in the South "poor white trash". People born poor who use that poverty as an excuse to not even try.

    The problems with that belief are that 1) it implies that racism is never a possible factor (and I hardly believe we're warranted in concluding that), and 2) it's blatant broad-brushing and oversimplifying things. Some poor black people might feel defeated and believe that they'll never be able to overcome because racism will always prevent them, but that doesn't seem to me like "they're using it as an excuse to be lazy and not ever work hard."
    Racism is the boogie man in those cases. There is no risk if you don't try, so there can be no reward... only failure.


    I'm not sure about that. This source claims that there's a slightly higher percentage of welfare recipients who happen to be black than white, which means that there are slightly more black welfare recipients than white welfare recipients. And in more general terms, this table from the US Census website reports that the percentage of all black Americans who live below poverty is almost three times higher than the percentage of all white non-hispanic Americans who live below poverty (27.2 to 9.7).
    I got this from the HuffPost:

    cap4.JPG

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/0...n_6771938.html

    Perhaps, but as noted above, where does one find the balance?
    By reinforcing the fact that an individual is more than the labels thrown on them. Stereotypes are often rooted in population behaviors, but no individual in that population need be subject to it.


    I'm sorry--this is too vague for me to be confident that we're talking about the same thing on this point. Do you have any specific examples of what you mean by this?
    I thought it was rather self-explanatory Sorry. My point was that no one is forced to live according to stereotypes. If a stereotype said "Left handers are artists", and I am left handed, I do not need to try to be an artist just because the stereotype says so. Nor should I automatically assume that a left handed person I meet is an artist. And in relation to Baltimore, not every protester is a looter.


    I see. My own life experiences have generally had me looking at the issue from another angle. I grew up in a fairly affluent suburb of a major city. Here in the suburbs, the public schools tend to rate as excellent, producing top-notch students and earning national awards and recognition. Many of them have excellent facilities with frequent renovations and come equipped with fancy interactive digital boards that fit OVER the traditional whiteboard in each classroom, even though the teachers never use them and most can't even figure out how to properly use them. Outside of academics, some schools in the area can even afford to have football stadiums that supposedly cost millions of dollars. Meanwhile, many public schools about an hour south in the city proper are in bad condition. They routinely rank among the worst schools in the nation, their facilities are in decaying condition, and the teachers need to cheat on standardized tests to allow students to move on. It has always seemed obvious to me that the affluent suburban schools don't need so much (especially the useless, completely ignored interactive digital boards and multi-million dollar football stadiums). That some of the what are clearly excess dollars really would be better spent on those poor, decaying inner-city schools. Yet some people in the affluent suburbs engage in rhetoric like "the government is STEALING our hard-earned dollars from us!" That, to me, seems like a gross and rather narrow-minded (if not a bit selfish) distortion.
    When it comes to using funds for government spending like education, public safety, and public works, I think there should be equal distribution of resources and technology. If one school gets Promethean boards (That's what they are called. My son's school got them last year and they are not used at all according to him) then all of them should get them. If one school needs to be renovated, then every school that needs renovation should get it. Worst cases get priority. I have no problem with distributing county taxes and fees equally among the county. But intentionally charging one group more in taxes than another is unjust in my opinion, regardless of how much more one group has. If you use the services (police, fire, library, etc.), and everyone does, then you should have to pay your share of the taxes for them. That's why I am for a flat consumption tax. But again, for another thread.

    These answers are compatible. The city residents believed that some cops murdered innocent citizens and that the justice system would fail the community and allow the cops to get away with murder. Many of those people who were killed happened to be black, and so some residents conclude that black people are disproportionately more likely to be betrayed by the justice system than white people. This understandably would lead them to feel that the lives of black people in effect matter less than the lives of white people.
    It's an improper assumption, not a conclusion. I saw several interviews with people on the street in the crowds in Baltimore, and of those who were protesting, maybe one or two were able to articulate any type of response about what they considered acceptable justice. Everyone claimed they wanted "justice" but few could say what that meant.


    But in some cases, such as those of Walter Scott and Eric Garner, the victims didn't commit any serious crimes when they were apprehended and then killed at the hands of the police. And in the case of Michael Brown, people initially thought that all he'd done was steal some cigarillos, which indisputably isn't an offense grave enough to warrant death.
    But the system did not fail in any of those cases. Whether there were improper jumps to conclusions is immaterial to whether the justice system succeeded or failed.


    I can't comment on Sharpton and Jackson, whom you and a few others so frequently mention, but I do recall seeing many black folks condemn the shooters of Officers Ramos and Liu in New York.
    I'm talking about other prominent black leaders, not just Jackson and Sharpton. And as an aside, I am disappointed with what Mayor de Blasio said about the subject.


    Even if it could somehow be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that there was literally nothing else that Darren Wilson could have done and that he was perfectly justified in pulling the trigger as opposed to using non-lethal force, at the time of the protests the details were too vague and muddy to argue that. It very understandably appeared at that point in time that the justice system was not at all operating correctly.
    And they assumed the worst and responded on their assumptions, to which they deserve to be chided on. The problem is the pattern. Jump to conclusions before the facts are known.


    While looters most definitely should not be conflated with protesters and rioters, I see no reason why a distinction must be drawn with the latter two. Some rioters may have had ulterior motives, but it seems to me that many other rioters were doing so as a specific point for the protest.
    The only difference between the rioters and the looters is that the looters took stuff while the rioters destroyed stuff.


    This is a nice-sounding speech, but it mustn't be forgotten that Dr. King also said "A riot is the language of the unheard"
    In the midst of saying that violence was not the right way, but was the way some responded:

    Source: http://www.gphistorical.org/mlk/mlkspeech/


    Now I wanted to say something about the fact that we have lived over these last two or three summers with agony and we have seen our cities going up in flames. And I would be the first to say that I am still committed to militant, powerful, massive, non*-violence as the most potent weapon in grappling with the problem from a direct action point of view. I'm absolutely convinced that a riot merely intensifies the fears of the white community while relieving the guilt. And I feel that we must always work with an effective, powerful weapon and method that brings about tangible results. But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard.

    Now the time is passing and I'm not going to… I was going into the need for direct action to dramatize and call attention to the gulf between promise and fulfillment. I've been searching for a long time for an alternative to riots on the one hand and timid supplication for justice on the other and I think that alternative is found in militant massive non-violence.

    © Copyright Original Source



    --and unfortunately, the fact of the matter appears to be that most of the unheard tend to be people of color. To interpret Dr. King's famous Dream speech as indicating that he wanted people to completely ignore the existence of race seems to be an unwarranted conclusion.
    I don't think that was what I conveyed, but if I did, let me clarify. We need each other. We need to get past the "us vs. them" mentality. As King said to the students of Grosse Point High...

    Source: http://www.gphistorical.org/mlk/mlkspeech/

    ... somehow, we must all learn to live together as brothers in this country or we're all going to perish together as fools. Our destinies are tied together. Whether we like it or not culturally and otherwise, every white person is a little bit negro and every negro is a little bit white. Our language, our music, our material prosperity and even our food are an amalgam of black and white, so there can be no separate black path to power and fulfillment that does not intersect white routes and there can ultimately be no separate white path to power and fulfillment short of social disaster without recognizing the necessity of sharing that power with black aspirations for freedom and human dignity. We must come to see. . .yes we do need each other, the black man needs the white man to save him from his fear and the white man needs the black man to free him from his guilt.

    © Copyright Original Source



    The categorization and separation based on those categories is what keeps us apart. It is what keeps this continuing war well-fed. As long as we are "white cops" and "black teens", we will spin our wheels and accuse each other without all of the facts, and repeat the futility of our fathers.


    I did my final term paper in my senior year on MLK and Gandhi's use of Thoreau's On Civil Disobedience, so I have read quite a lot of their speeches.
    Last edited by Bill the Cat; 05-07-2015, 10:56 AM.
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    • #17
      Thank you, that saved me looking it up.
      Micah 6:8 He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
        Ah, so you picked up on my intended irony. Well done.

        Every time I hear about people complaining about "white privilege", I'm reminded of a black woman I worked with years ago. She wasn't very good at her job, but that didn't stop her from overestimating her abilities. Every time a white coworker who was more skilled and diligent received a raise or promotion while she stayed stuck in the same position with the same pay, she of course blamed it on racism instead of looking at what she could do to improve herself as an employee so that she, too, could advance in her career.
        I'll have to take your word that she was genuinely incompetent, but even if this anecdote was true, it's fallacious to generalize it into "all black people are using racism as an excuse."


        Originally posted by Irate Canadian View Post
        Agreed, however, I just wished they would self-police a lot more. If more movements among the people got the people who were in it for material gains/thievery/ out, then these movements would have a better chance of not being dismissed with the excuse of "because white people don't like them."
        That seems to be a fair point.


        Originally posted by Paprika View Post
        The proper treatment would be to analyse class privilege rather than race privilege; class privilege is a near-universal phenomenon across societies and more accurate classification than 'race privilege', since it is patently obvious that there can be vast inequalities between people of the same race.
        Certainly class privilege ought to be analyzed, but why should that be "rather than," rather than "along with?"
        Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed. Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow.--Isaiah 1:17

        I don't think that all forms o[f] slavery are inherently immoral.--seer

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post
          I'd quibble that it is the average of the individuals. Sociology typically discards radicals unless considering just them as a group.
          Alright then.

          He talked about WHITES making choices, and that white privilege is continued just by whites making those choices. TUP's summary is a bit sensationalist, true, but it is not an inaccurate paraphrase. I also find it pretty disgusting that others like the good Professor seem to think that just because I am white, I somehow lead this charmed life where all I need to do is walk into a place, and everyone is fawning over me to be the first one to serve my every whim.
          I don't see him coming across like that. Racial privilege is supposed to only refer to privilege that accompanies race. Having some conferred advantages because one is white doesn't mean that one can't experience genuine disadvantage in terms of gender or class or sexual orientation or what-have-you.

          So, they choose to continue to hold the present hostage because of something that ended over 50 years ago? I have a serious problem with victim mentalities like that. I have known too many quality people who were not white males to ever entertain such nonsense as "we can't help it", and ""because your grandpa owned my grandpa".
          How does "we can't help it" or "your grandpa owned my grandpa" follow from "'black colleges' and 'black churches' and 'black businesses' exist in large part because historically speaking, people who were black tended to be excluded from the 'mainstream' generic colleges, churches and businesses?"

          Progressives since Roosevelt have been for "cradle to grave security for the men, women, and children of America". I don't think that's a debatable claim.
          Perhaps the people I interact with aren't what you're referring to when you say "progressive."

          Oh, I agree. But, as I said before, too much focus is on the groups right now. We need to help people realize that they are MUCH more than just mindless drones who must tow the "race/party/national origin" group line. A black man need not only look at shopping at a black owned business. A white female need not seek out college clubs that only include white women. If we can all be valued as individuals, and not drones of a category, we are better off. That's all I am saying here.
          This is a fair point, and one that I agree with.

          The country. If you love the country so much, why would you desire to fundamentally change it? Would you suggest fundamentally changing your wife?
          I don't see any contradiction there. Sports fans of a last-place team want the team to fundamentally change precisely because they love their team. A good husband who is married to an alcoholic wife may want his wife to fundamentally change precisely because he loves her and knows she needs to change for the good of herself, her children and her husband. And some people want their country to fundamentally change precisely because they love their country and desire that it function at the best that it can be.

          Many do. Same with what we call here in the South "poor white trash". People born poor who use that poverty as an excuse to not even try.
          No doubt some people don't try as hard as they can, which is unfortunate. But I think we should be cautious about making that judgment--many other people are genuinely trying hard but simply aren't succeeding for some reason, and still others may have genuinely tried their hardest and then given up in defeat.

          I thought it was rather self-explanatory Sorry. My point was that no one is forced to live according to stereotypes. If a stereotype said "Left handers are artists", and I am left handed, I do not need to try to be an artist just because the stereotype says so. Nor should I automatically assume that a left handed person I meet is an artist. And in relation to Baltimore, not every protester is a looter.
          We seem to be in agreement here.

          When it comes to using funds for government spending like education, public safety, and public works, I think there should be equal distribution of resources and technology. If one school gets Promethean boards (That's what they are called. My son's school got them last year and they are not used at all according to him) then all of them should get them. If one school needs to be renovated, then every school that needs renovation should get it. Worst cases get priority. I have no problem with distributing county taxes and fees equally among the county. But intentionally charging one group more in taxes than another is unjust in my opinion, regardless of how much more one group has. If you use the services (police, fire, library, etc.), and everyone does, then you should have to pay your share of the taxes for them. That's why I am for a flat consumption tax. But again, for another thread.
          And we seem to be in agreement here as well.

          It's an improper assumption, not a conclusion. I saw several interviews with people on the street in the crowds in Baltimore, and of those who were protesting, maybe one or two were able to articulate any type of response about what they considered acceptable justice. Everyone claimed they wanted "justice" but few could say what that meant.
          I see.

          But the system did not fail in any of those cases. Whether there were improper jumps to conclusions is immaterial to whether the justice system succeeded or failed.
          Yeah, that was more of a "I'm not saying I support it, but I understand where they're coming from" explanation. Understanding is the first step, after all.

          In the midst of saying that violence was not the right way, but was the way some responded
          Right. He sought an alternative to riots, but he also didn't want to flat-out condemn them because he realized that they were understandable responses to legitimately bad conditions.

          I don't think that was what I conveyed, but if I did, let me clarify. We need each other. We need to get past the "us vs. them" mentality. As King said to the students of Grosse Point High...

          Source: http://www.gphistorical.org/mlk/mlkspeech/

          ... somehow, we must all learn to live together as brothers in this country or we're all going to perish together as fools. Our destinies are tied together. Whether we like it or not culturally and otherwise, every white person is a little bit negro and every negro is a little bit white. Our language, our music, our material prosperity and even our food are an amalgam of black and white, so there can be no separate black path to power and fulfillment that does not intersect white routes and there can ultimately be no separate white path to power and fulfillment short of social disaster without recognizing the necessity of sharing that power with black aspirations for freedom and human dignity. We must come to see. . .yes we do need each other, the black man needs the white man to save him from his fear and the white man needs the black man to free him from his guilt.

          © Copyright Original Source



          The categorization and separation based on those categories is what keeps us apart. It is what keeps this continuing war well-fed. As long as we are "white cops" and "black teens", we will spin our wheels and accuse each other without all of the facts, and repeat the futility of our fathers.
          I agree with the general sentiment here. I don't think the race of the cops should matter. And I don't want the race of the victims to matter (in large part because I don't want there to be victims at all). But as things currently stand, if there indeed is a systemic flaw and disparity along the lines of race in these issues, I believe a proper response entails paying attention to it instead of ignoring it or fancifully wishing that it didn't exist, so that people on both sides can have a better understanding of each other and mutually reach a solution in brotherhood. Most of us want a world in which race doesn't matter, but it may be that people first have to acknowledge its possible significance so that we can one day achieve a world in which race can finally stop mattering.
          Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed. Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow.--Isaiah 1:17

          I don't think that all forms o[f] slavery are inherently immoral.--seer

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            Every time I hear about people complaining about "white privilege", I'm reminded of a black woman I worked with years ago. She wasn't very good at her job, but that didn't stop her from overestimating her abilities. Every time a white coworker who was more skilled and diligent received a raise or promotion while she stayed stuck in the same position with the same pay, she of course blamed it on racism instead of looking at what she could do to improve herself as an employee so that she, too, could advance in her career.
            On the other hand in all the years I was working the most efficient secretary we had was a black woman. We did not have her long, she rapidly moved up the ladder.
            Micah 6:8 He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

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            • #21
              If there is white privilege, I sure don't have any. Otherwise, I'd be rich.

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              • #22
                Yeah, how come no one sent me the white privilege memo?
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                • #23
                  I believe that white privilege is real, but it can only be dealt with by moving toward racial harmony. All this accusatory stuff only sets things back.
                  Micah 6:8 He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DLAbaoaqu View Post
                    If there is white privilege, I sure don't have any. Otherwise, I'd be rich.
                    I'm not sure why so many people seem to automatically think of it in financial terms. Racial privilege tends to manifest itself in much more mundane forms, such as going to any local store and being confident that you can find "flesh-colored" band-aids that match your skin tone. Or wearing loose-fitting pants and a ballcap while wandering in an affluent neighborhood and no one wondering if you're up to no good. Or being able to channel surf and find plenty of people who look like you represented on every program. Or being able to excel in some subject or activity and not being called "a credit to your race," as if it was implicitly assumed that most people of your race couldn't excel. Conversely, being able to fail in some subject or activity and not eliciting surprise or judgments of "that's so typical of your race." Or committing a serious crime and knowing that the media and general public won't blame your entire race/community for your individual actions. Or answering an initially innocent-sounding question like "Where are you from?" and knowing that it won't be followed up with "No, where are you REALLY from?"
                    Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed. Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow.--Isaiah 1:17

                    I don't think that all forms o[f] slavery are inherently immoral.--seer

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Teallaura View Post
                      Yeah, how come no one sent me the white privilege memo?
                      What? You didn't get your card in the mail?

                      White-Privilege-AMEX.jpg

                      Maybe only MALES have white privilege?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by DLAbaoaqu View Post
                        If there is white privilege, I sure don't have any. Otherwise, I'd be rich.
                        Where you are, you might not receive as much from it as some. White privilege has a lot of overlap with majority privilege. It's also not the only privilege system, and their are even a few privileges that blacks and browns, and yellows have the whites do not, however the privileges that whites have more often are ways that directly impact their well-being in basic ways.

                        There are places where white people can shop without being followed under suspicion of them being thieves where black people are followed like that.

                        A white male with a criminal record is more likely to get hired than a man of color with a clean record.

                        The likelihood that you will go to prison at some point in your life as a white person is 4-11%. For a person of color, they have a 4-50% chance of going to prison at some point in their life.

                        Unemployment for people of color is much higher than for white people.

                        More white people are born into poverty because they are the majority, but a higher portion of people of color are born into poverty.

                        On a less life-dependent note:

                        Going back before colonialism, do you learn more from Asian history or European history in school? An Asian will learn less about people that looked like him/her in school than a Caucasian person will. None the less, does Taoism have that much less impact than early feudal systems in Europe does? Doubtful it is much more, but it is the history of the largest racial group in America. One wonders if much is even known about Africa outside of the Kush empire, Egypt and Ethiopia and Rome as African history before the time of European explorers and colonialism.

                        Did you go to school with people who looked like you? Most white people did, but that is a little less common with people of color. If you brought a homemade meal to lunch with you, would people ever comment on it being weird or smelling gross? Someone might say that about Asian food.

                        Because there are fewer people of color, there is more riding on each positive example. I recently saw a youtude video that gave some examples relative to being Latino. He also spoke of the need for the minority communities to strive for a better future for them.

                        Warning: this has one cuss word in it. It also highlights a lot of the points I am trying to make with regard to the Latino community and addresses how they should respond.

                        (And if you watch his other videos, he does the benefits of being Latino, some of which might be considered Latino privilege.
                        I am become death...

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Teallaura View Post
                          Yeah, how come no one sent me the white privilege memo?
                          I would encourage you to actually look it up if you missed the memo. People of color didn't have the same privilege to not receive it, or at least part of it.

                          White privilege exists in that analyzing privilege based on white or provides results. Privilege is the new way of analyzing some aspects of inequality in our society. It is applied to race, sex, physical ability, and maybe a few other things. White privilege was brought up by Tim Wise several years ago. I remember hearing something like the mortality of a new born is significantly higher is his mother is a white woman with a high school degree than it would be if his mother was a black woman with a college degree. It does not remove responsibility from people of color for their actions, but it helps build understanding and informs people of how to encourage a world that treats everyone with the respect for their existence of God's beloved creation and highlights ways that we can create opportunity where it is needed.

                          I haven't read all of the opening post on Baltimore, though I have read enough to say that while the rioting was wrong, their was a history to inspire anger. When I see white people posting things saying all lives matter, I agree with the words, but I wonder if the sentiment would be expressed like that the other way around.
                          I am become death...

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Ana Dragule View Post
                            It does not remove responsibility from people of color for their actions
                            It's very often (if not mostly) used to do that: eg. 'Blacks get arrested more than whites' is used to blame the white-denominated system instead of criticising the blacks for proportionately higher rates of crime.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Paprika View Post
                              It's very often (if not mostly) used to do that: eg. 'Blacks get arrested more than whites' is used to blame the white-denominated system instead of criticising the blacks for proportionately higher rates of crime.
                              Or when blacks commit crimes, they are more publicly noticeable, possibly more violent crimes than whites tend to commit, in denser areas with cheap housing as a result of statistically higher socioeconomic status in places of more police focus because of past precedent.

                              Things like bandaids and people on tv that look like us are often of less political significance than arrests.

                              Perhaps I should clarify though, we all have some ultimate responsibility for our actions, regardless of race or gender., but understanding privilege has value.
                              Last edited by Ana Dragule; 05-19-2015, 05:18 AM.
                              I am become death...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Ana Dragule View Post
                                Or when blacks commit crimes, they are more publicly noticeable, possibly more violent crimes than whites tend to commit, in denser areas with cheap housing as a result of statistically higher socioeconomic status in places of more police focus because of past precedent.

                                Things like bandaids and people on tv that look like us are often of less political significance than arrests.

                                Perhaps I should clarify though, we all have some ultimate responsibility for our actions, regardless of race or gender., but understanding privilege has value.
                                'Privilege' connoted the idea that those better off don't deserve it, when it may very well be (and often) those who are worse off who got themselves into that situation.

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