Announcement

Collapse

Civics 101 Guidelines

Want to argue about politics? Healthcare reform? Taxes? Governments? You've come to the right place!

Try to keep it civil though. The rules still apply here.
See more
See less

America's educators arranging more than just the physical molestation of kids now

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • America's educators arranging more than just the physical molestation of kids now

    Well, that's not entirely fair, they've been molesting kids' minds long before they started sending special ed students into the Bathroom of Baphomet.

    https://quantumprogress.wordpress.co...ssroom-part-1/

    At the incredible People of Color Conference, I met Moses Rifkin, an outstanding physics teacher at University Prep in Seattle. I learned about the incredible unit he teaches his senior physics students that brilliantly brings lessons about social justice, privilege, and institutional racism into the physics classroom and leads to a measurable change in student understanding and attitudes about these subjects. Moses graciously agreed to write a series of guest posts for this blog about his curriculum and will be speaking to the Global Physics Department on February 18.

    For the first four years of my high school teaching career, I felt stuck. I care deeply about making the world a better place – duh – but felt that as a science teacher, my opportunities to do so were limited. I was jealous of my colleagues in English and History who got to talk every day in class about society and how it worked and how to be moral and caring and kind, whereas those conversations with students only happened for me outside the classroom. That I was teaching at a private school only made matters worse: my students weren’t learning about their own privilege (academic and, in most cases, economic and racial). I wanted to make my classroom a part of the solution, but wasn’t sure how. What’s a science teacher to do?

    Ten years later, I have come somewhat closer to finding an answer. I feel like it’s an answer because I’ve found a way to introduce my students to the ideas of racial and gender privilege, to the idea that our society is far from a meritocracy, and to broaden their conception of who (racially, gender-wise, etc.) does science to include a much broader slice of society; I say somewhat because it’s still very much a work in progress as I fumble my way upwards.
    "As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them. O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths." Isaiah 3:12

    There is no such thing as innocence, only degrees of guilt.

  • #2
    Originally posted by the article
    I do tell them, too, that we’re going to be focusing on race – specifically on the lack of black physicists– because it’s particularly illustrative of the bigger issues I’m trying to introduce. "
    as a physics teacher he's just being responsible -- matter, energy, motion, and force behave differently when there are more black physicists
    "Some people feel guilty about their anxieties and regard them as a defect of faith but they are afflictions, not sins. Like all afflictions, they are, if we can so take them, our share in the passion of Christ." - That Guy Everyone Quotes

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Darth Executor View Post
      Well, that's not entirely fair, they've been molesting kids' minds long before they started sending special ed students into the Bathroom of Baphomet.

      https://quantumprogress.wordpress.co...ssroom-part-1/
      Ug, a physics teacher who wishes he were a social-science teacher. He seems to equate "making the world a better place" with teaching about "social justice" and "privilege". And says, "I care deeply about making the world a better place – duh – but felt that as a science teacher, my opportunities to do so were limited." What business does he have teaching physics if he doesn't think physics helps makes the world a better place?
      Perhaps the owner of that private school should fire the teacher for spending weeks of classtime not teaching physics (and not caring about the educational value of physics).

      "But why in a physics class? Because, I think, these are ideas that cross disciplines. Whether or not you go on to study physics, having an understanding of how people end up doing what they do (and, more broadly, how our society functions) is a critical aspect of learning and thinking critically. Senior Physics happens to be the class that we share, and so our investigation can begin here. In other words: why not a physics class?"

      Maybe the class could examine that as an example of poor reasoning.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm sick of positrons shoving their quark privilege in my Hawking radiation.

        Comment

        Related Threads

        Collapse

        Topics Statistics Last Post
        Started by Christian3, Today, 02:14 PM
        2 responses
        25 views
        0 likes
        Last Post Christian3  
        Started by seer, Today, 02:00 PM
        0 responses
        12 views
        0 likes
        Last Post seer
        by seer
         
        Started by CivilDiscourse, 10-24-2020, 08:17 AM
        10 responses
        91 views
        1 like
        Last Post CivilDiscourse  
        Started by LiconaFan97, 10-23-2020, 04:56 PM
        32 responses
        202 views
        0 likes
        Last Post seer
        by seer
         
        Started by Juvenal, 10-23-2020, 11:08 AM
        10 responses
        103 views
        0 likes
        Last Post Juvenal
        by Juvenal
         
        Working...
        X