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  • Originally posted by JimL View Post
    After his knowledge of the danger the virus posed was exposed in Woodwards book, Trumps newfound excuse for downplaying it was that he didn't want to create a panic. Nobody with half a brain would believe that. Informing the American people of the danger so that they can better protect themselves was hardly going to create a panic. Although we are talking about Trump here, so perhaps he did believe that. But then, what does he even mean by a panic? So the question remains, was it just his, and or his advisors stupidity? And if not that, then what was the real reason behind his downplaying of the danger? Whatever the true answer is, the decision is responsible for tens of thousands of deaths, an unprecedented economic collapse, and for that reason alone he should be voted out of office.
    It is documented that Trump received detailed briefings on the dangers and severity of COVID-19 pandemic in January. Is there any evidence that this information was distributed to the public, and Congress in January. I have not found any evidence that he did.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
      Actually no, it is not clear the Swedish consider their efforts and their original strategy a success.

      Source: https://www.ft.com/content/7acfc5b8-d96f-455b-9f36-b70dc850428f



      Sweden is no longer the outlier it used to be on coronavirus. It no longer has the least restrictive approach to the pandemic in Europe and it has lost its briefly held status as the country with the highest number of deaths per capita after its number of Covid-19 cases decreased over the summer. Its economy has suffered less than the European average in recent months, but at least as much and possibly more than its Nordic neighbors.

      “We get a second chance. We don’t want this to take off again. We now have the chance to learn and do additional things to avoid things taking off,” said Cecilia Söderberg-Nauclér, a critic of Sweden’s approach and a professor of cell and molecular immunology at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

      The debate about the wisdom of Sweden’s lighter-touch strategy on the pandemic is as fierce as it has ever been, but the situation on the ground has calmed during its main summer month of July.

      The number of cases per capita fell by 86 per cent in the month from the end of June, although they have risen slightly in recent days and are still relatively high by European standards.

      © Copyright Original Source



      There is an interesting line of thinking concerning what human efforts that will control the spread of COVID-19, which I may address further in a later post.

      My concern from the beginning of the CIOVID-19 pandemic is the lack of an organized aggressive effort to protect the elderly and the vulnerable. It was known very very early that the high fatality rate was a very real threat. I have never heard nor seen and concern from Donald Trump for concern over the elderly and vulnerable, nor was any plan ever implemented to protect them.

      It is also acknowledged that countries that are relatively isolated like Sweden, New Zealand and Taiwan cannot be compared to large diverse countries with extensive connections worldwide like the USA.

      Source: https://www.healthline.com/health-news/heres-what-happened-in-sweden-and-you-cant-compare-it-to-u-s



      Why Sweden’s COVID-19 Strategy Can’t Work in the U.S.

      Sweden has seen a higher death rate than its neighbors. JESSICA GOW/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Images

      Some Americans opposed to lockdown measures look to Sweden for inspiration, which has largely remained open. But Sweden hasn’t come through the pandemic unscathed. Sweden’s per capita death rate was 36 per 100,000, which is higher than the United States at 27 and neighboring Denmark at 9.

      All data and statistics are based on publicly available data at the time of publication. Some information may be out of date. Visit our coronavirus hub and follow our live updates page for the most recent information on the COVID-19 outbreak.

      For Americans anxious for the end of government-mandated coronavirus lockdowns, or those opposed to these restrictions in the first place, Sweden has become a rallying cry.

      In March, while much of Europe was closing businesses and schools, and asking citizens to stay home, Sweden largely remained open, including restaurants, shops, and gyms.

      Swedes do practice physical distancing, but officials rely on people to voluntarily follow these guidelines. People over age 70, who are at higher risk from COVID-19, are also advised to limit physical contact and stay home.

      Sweden not untouched by COVID-19 Sweden’s more relaxed approach — coexisting with the new coronavirus rather than declaring war on it — hasn’t been entirely painless.

      “In terms of the mortality rate per capita from COVID-19, Sweden is not doing as well as the other countries nearby in Scandinavia that are similar but have approached the pandemic in a different way,” said Dr. Saahir Khan, assistant clinical professor of infectious disease at UCI Health in Orange, California.

      As of May 18, Sweden’s per capita death rate was 36 per 100,000, which is higher than the United States at 27 and neighboring Denmark at 9.

      Over this past week, Sweden also had the highest per capita death rate for COVID-19 in Europe.

      Sweden, Denmark, and other Scandinavian countries all have strong public healthcare systems and low levels of health inequality.

      Even with Sweden’s lack of a lockdown, the country is still a long way from herd immunity. This is the point at which enough people are immune to a virus that it stops spreading out of control.

      Scientists estimate that herd immunity for the new coronavirus occurs at 70 percent.

      Recent antibody testing in Sweden found that 7.3 percent of the population had had an infection with the new coronavirus.

      Spencer Fox, PhD, a data scientist at the University of Texas at Austin, says this means the country “needs 10 times more infections to actually reach herd immunity to halt the epidemic.”

      If deaths in Sweden continue at the same rate, this could result in around 38,000 deaths by that time.

      The pandemic has also exposed some of the country’s health inequalities. Immigrant communities in Sweden were among those hardest-hit by the virus.

      On June 3, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist, Anders Tegnell, admitted that “improvements” could have been made in how the country responded to COVID-19, but he defended the decision not to go into lock down.

      “There are things that we could have done better but in general I think that Sweden has chosen the right way,” Tegnell said in an interview with Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter.

      He said the country’s approach to physical distancing “worked well,” but added that long-term care homes for older adults weren’t protected as well as they should have been.

      “We knew that group was very fragile and that we would get a lot of deaths if they got infected. But we didn’t know that the disease would enter so easily and for the spread to be so big,” he said.

      Sweden had to adjust its strategy for dealing with COVID-19 after a spike in deaths at long-term care homes. This shows the challenges of letting one segment of society move freely while trying to protect others.

      “You may not be at high risk from COVID-19, but as a society we’re interconnected — the things we do affect other people,” Khan said. “So I would ask people to keep that in mind when they’re looking at Sweden’s experience with COVID-19.”

      Sweden’s economy has also not come through unscathed. The country has experienced similar economic disruptions as in Denmark and Norway, both of which enacted more strict measures.

      © Copyright Original Source

      Indeed, the Swedish example is misleading (mostly because the people using it are not looking very closely). The reality is the most countries that have tried to avoid any sort of restrictions have found themselve dealing with serious problems. It's a virus, it does what viruses do, which is spread when they can. If you give it an opportunity to spread, it will spread. Anytime it doesn't spread, it is because something has prevented it from spreading. So anywhere it is not growing exponentially, you need to look around and find out what is actually preventing it from doing so.
      He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me."

      "So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets"

      Comment


      • Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
        It is documented that Trump received detailed briefings on the dangers and severity of COVID-19 pandemic in January.
        Late January, the 23rd to be precise. About a week later, he instituted a foreign travel ban which Democrats lambasted as racist and xenophobic.
        Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
        But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
        Than a fool in the eyes of God


        From "Fools Gold" by Petra

        Comment


        • Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/coronavirus-death-toll-maine-wedding-rises-5-over-175-infected-n1240138



          Coronavirus death toll from Maine wedding rises to 7, with over 175 infected

          Outbreaks at a rehabilitation center and a county jail have been linked to the wedding and reception in August.

          The death toll from a coronavirus outbreak linked to an indoor wedding and reception in Maine has risen to seven, with the number of cases connected to the event up to 176.

          The latest death was reported at the Maplecrest Rehabilitation Center in Madison, where five prior deaths were also deemed connected to the Aug. 7 wedding and reception. One person died at a hospital in the Millinocket area, a spokesman for the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

          About 65 people attended the event, in violation of Gov. Janet Mills' executive order limiting indoor gatherings to 50 people, the Maine CDC has said.

          The wedding ceremony was held at Tri Town Baptist Church in East Millinocket, about 63 miles north of Bangor, and a reception was held at the Big Moose Inn Cabins and Campground in Millinocket.

          A person who answered the phone Tuesday at Big Moose Inn said they are not commenting and the church could not immediately be reached.

          None of the seven people who have died attended the wedding or the reception.

          But among those who did attend the event was an employee of the York County Jail, where 72 cases have been linked to the gathering, health officials have said.

          Maine health officials have also said the wedding and reception are tied to the virus' spread at a Madison rehabilitation center.

          And, the state is investigating whether an outbreak at Calvary Baptist Church, whose pastor officiated at the wedding, is linked to the event. The church is tied to at least 10 cases.

          © Copyright Original Source

          Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
          Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
          But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

          go with the flow the river knows . . .

          Frank

          I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

          Comment


          • Trump is the one who had the intelligence data and briefings, and he was in charge, and admitted he knew the danger and potential of the pandemic, and lied and deceived the public. Is there any evidence that he shared this information with Congress?

            The partial stopping the flights from China was late and not effective, because it was only limited, and the spread of the virus was only a few dozen infected people in December and January.
            Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
            Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
            But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

            go with the flow the river knows . . .

            Frank

            I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

            Comment


            • Fatalities today in the USA is over 1,400.
              Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
              Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
              But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

              go with the flow the river knows . . .

              Frank

              I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

              Comment


              • The reason that Trump and then his fans keep pointing out his China travel ban, is because it's all they've got. And it wasn't even a ban. Some 40,000 people came in from China after the so called ban.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
                  It is documented that Trump received detailed briefings on the dangers and severity of COVID-19 pandemic in January. Is there any evidence that this information was distributed to the public, and Congress in January. I have not found any evidence that he did.
                  No, not that I'm aware of. What he did was to assure the public that there was nothing to be concerned about, that he "had it totally under control".. An assertion he made on Jan. 22nd.

                  On Jan.24th: "Coronavirus is very much under control in the US".

                  " " 25th: "In fact, we're very close to a vaccine".

                  " " 26th: we're going very substantially down (in cases) not up".

                  " " 27th: "One day it's like a miracle, it will disappear".

                  March 8th: We have a perfectly coordinated and fine tuned plan for our attack on coronavirus".

                  " 10th: It will go away. Just stay calm. It will go away".

                  " 13th: National Emergency was declared!
                  Last edited by JimL; 09-16-2020, 08:20 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by JimL View Post
                    No, not that I'm aware of. What he did was to assure the public that there was nothing to be concerned about, that he "had it totally under control".. An assertion he made on Jan. 22nd.

                    On Jan.24th: "Coronavirus is very much under control in the US".

                    " " 25th: "In fact, we're very close to a vaccine".

                    " " 26th: we're going very substantially down (in cases) not up".

                    " " 27th: "One day it's like a miracle, it will disappear".

                    March 8th: We have a perfectly coordinated and fine tuned plan for our attack on coronavirus".

                    " 10th: It will go away. Just stay calm. It will go away".

                    " 13th: National Emergency was declared!
                    • Wired, Robert Dingwall: "We should deescalate the war on coronavirus."

                      New York Governor Andrew Cuomo: “It is about the vulnerable. It's not about 95% of us. It's about a few percent who are vulnerable. That's all this is about. Bring down that anxiety, bring down that fear, bring down that paranoia.”

                      New York Times, Dr. David Katz: Is Our Fight Against Coronavirus Worse Than the Disease. "As much as 99 percent of active cases in the general population are ‘mild’ and do not require specific medical treatment.”

                      CDC: (Guidance through at least April 4) “The immediate risk of being exposed to this virus is still low for most Americans.”

                      Gov. Cuomo: “Many people will get the virus, but few will be truly endangered. Hold both of those facts in your hands: Many will get it, up to 80 percent may get it, but few are truly endangered, and we know who they are.”

                      Axios, Rebecca Falconer: Cuomo: “[T]he general risk remains low in New York. ... No reason for anxiety.”

                      USA Today, John Bacon: Coronavirus not a global health crisis.

                      BBC, Robert Cuffe: “The UK government's chief medical advisor, Professor Chris Whitty, says even though the rates are higher for older people, ‘the great majority of older people will have a mild or moderate disease.'”

                      Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House Coronavirus Task Force: “This is not a major threat to the people in the United States and it is not something that the citizens of the United States right now should be worried about.”

                      New York Times, Katie Hafner: “Amid the uncertainty swirling around the coronavirus pandemic stands one incontrovertible fact: The highest rate of fatalities is among older people, particularly those with underlying medical conditions.”

                      Oxiris Barbot, New York City health commissioner: “We are encouraging New Yorkers to go about their everyday lives and suggest practicing everyday precautions that we do through the flu season.”

                      Associated Press, CDC and World Health Organization (WHO): “The virus is still much less widespread than annual flu epidemics, which cause up to 5 million severe cases around the world and up to 650,000 deaths annually, according to the WHO."

                      NPR, Allison Aubrey: "Worried about catching the new coronavirus? In the U.S., the flu is a bigger threat."

                      Buzzfeed, Dan Vergano: "Don’t worry about the coronavirus, worry about the flu."

                      Axios, Bob Herman: Why we panic about coronavirus but not the flu. “If you’re freaking out about coronavirus but you didn’t get a flu shot, you’ve got it backwards."

                      Kaiser Health News, "Something Far Deadlier Than The Wuhan Virus Lurks Near You."

                      William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University: "When we think about the relative danger of this new coronavirus and influenza ... coronavirus will be a blip on the horizon in comparison.”

                      LA Times, Soumya Karlamangla: For Americans, flu remains a bigger threat than coronavirus. “Unlike the coronavirus, which so far hasn’t led to any deaths in the U.S., influenza has killed approximately 10,000 Americans since October, according to federal data released Friday.” “…A much deadlier killer already stalking the United States has been largely overshadowed: the flu.”

                      University of California Riverside epidemiologist Brandon Brown: “Here in the U.S., [flu] is what is killing us…Why should we be afraid of something that has not killed people here in this country?” “I think we need to shift our attention back to the flu.”

                      Daily Beast, Michael Daly: "The virus killing kids [flu] isn’t the one dominating headlines."

                      The Washington Post, Lenny Bernstein: "Get a Grippe, America. The flu is a much bigger threat than coronavirus, for now."

                      The Washington Post, "Why we should be wary of the aggressive government response to coronavirus."

                      Lancet Medical Journal (March 12): Death rates lowest for those under 30, deaths at least 5x more common for people with diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure etc., median age of deaths are 70 with deficit of infections among children.

                      U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams: “What we want most of America to know is that you're not at high risk for getting coronavirus, and if you do get it you are likely to recover. Ninety-eight, 99 percent of people are going to fully recover.”

                      US News and World Report, and Richardo Alonso-Zaldivar of Associated Press: “For most people, the virus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough.”

                      New York Times Dr. David Katz: Is Our Fight Against Coronavirus Worse Than the Disease? "As much as 99 percent of active cases in the general population are ‘mild’ and do not require specific medical treatment. The small percentage of cases that do require such services are highly concentrated among those age 60 and older, and further so the older people are.”

                      Web MD, Kathleen Doheny: The fatality rate from COVID-19 is not as high as experts have reported, according to a new analysis published Monday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

                      Dr. Fauci in the New England Journal of Medicine: “…the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%)…”

                      Dr. Peter Hotez: “Historically travel bans tend not to work very well, they tend to be counter productive.”

                      New York Times, Rosie Spinks: Who Says It’s Not Safe to Travel to China? The coronavirus travel ban is unjust and doesn’t work anyway. “The coronavirus outbreak seems defined by two opposing forces: the astonishing efficiency with which the travel industry connects the world and a political moment dominated by xenophobic rhetoric and the building of walls.”

                      New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio: "I'm encouraging New Yorkers to go on with your lives: get out on the town despite Coronavirus.”

                      Oxiris Barbot, New York City health commissioner: People “who had recently traveled from Wuhan were not being urged to self-quarantine or avoid large public gatherings.” “There is no reason not to take the subway, not to take the bus, not to go out to your favorite restaurant, and certainly not to miss the parade next Sunday.”

                      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged people to visit San Francisco’s Chinatown. "That’s what we’re trying to do today is to say everything is fine here. Come because precautions have been taken. The city is on top of the situation."

                      Mayor of Florence Dario Nardella: Suggested residents hug Chinese people to encourage them in the fight against the novel coronavirus.


                    https://justthenews.com/politics-pol...-comments-they
                    That's what
                    - She

                    Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals
                    - Manya the Holy Szin (The Quintara Marathon)

                    I may not be as old as dirt, but me and dirt are starting to have an awful lot in common
                    Stephen R. Donaldson

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post
                      • Wired, Robert Dingwall: "We should deescalate the war on coronavirus."

                        New York Governor Andrew Cuomo: “It is about the vulnerable. It's not about 95% of us. It's about a few percent who are vulnerable. That's all this is about. Bring down that anxiety, bring down that fear, bring down that paranoia.”

                        New York Times, Dr. David Katz: Is Our Fight Against Coronavirus Worse Than the Disease. "As much as 99 percent of active cases in the general population are ‘mild’ and do not require specific medical treatment.”

                        CDC: (Guidance through at least April 4) “The immediate risk of being exposed to this virus is still low for most Americans.”

                        Gov. Cuomo: “Many people will get the virus, but few will be truly endangered. Hold both of those facts in your hands: Many will get it, up to 80 percent may get it, but few are truly endangered, and we know who they are.”

                        Axios, Rebecca Falconer: Cuomo: “[T]he general risk remains low in New York. ... No reason for anxiety.”

                        USA Today, John Bacon: Coronavirus not a global health crisis.

                        BBC, Robert Cuffe: “The UK government's chief medical advisor, Professor Chris Whitty, says even though the rates are higher for older people, ‘the great majority of older people will have a mild or moderate disease.'”

                        Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House Coronavirus Task Force: “This is not a major threat to the people in the United States and it is not something that the citizens of the United States right now should be worried about.”

                        New York Times, Katie Hafner: “Amid the uncertainty swirling around the coronavirus pandemic stands one incontrovertible fact: The highest rate of fatalities is among older people, particularly those with underlying medical conditions.”

                        Oxiris Barbot, New York City health commissioner: “We are encouraging New Yorkers to go about their everyday lives and suggest practicing everyday precautions that we do through the flu season.”

                        Associated Press, CDC and World Health Organization (WHO): “The virus is still much less widespread than annual flu epidemics, which cause up to 5 million severe cases around the world and up to 650,000 deaths annually, according to the WHO."

                        NPR, Allison Aubrey: "Worried about catching the new coronavirus? In the U.S., the flu is a bigger threat."

                        Buzzfeed, Dan Vergano: "Don’t worry about the coronavirus, worry about the flu."

                        Axios, Bob Herman: Why we panic about coronavirus but not the flu. “If you’re freaking out about coronavirus but you didn’t get a flu shot, you’ve got it backwards."

                        Kaiser Health News, "Something Far Deadlier Than The Wuhan Virus Lurks Near You."

                        William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University: "When we think about the relative danger of this new coronavirus and influenza ... coronavirus will be a blip on the horizon in comparison.”

                        LA Times, Soumya Karlamangla: For Americans, flu remains a bigger threat than coronavirus. “Unlike the coronavirus, which so far hasn’t led to any deaths in the U.S., influenza has killed approximately 10,000 Americans since October, according to federal data released Friday.” “…A much deadlier killer already stalking the United States has been largely overshadowed: the flu.”

                        University of California Riverside epidemiologist Brandon Brown: “Here in the U.S., [flu] is what is killing us…Why should we be afraid of something that has not killed people here in this country?” “I think we need to shift our attention back to the flu.”

                        Daily Beast, Michael Daly: "The virus killing kids [flu] isn’t the one dominating headlines."

                        The Washington Post, Lenny Bernstein: "Get a Grippe, America. The flu is a much bigger threat than coronavirus, for now."

                        The Washington Post, "Why we should be wary of the aggressive government response to coronavirus."

                        Lancet Medical Journal (March 12): Death rates lowest for those under 30, deaths at least 5x more common for people with diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure etc., median age of deaths are 70 with deficit of infections among children.

                        U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams: “What we want most of America to know is that you're not at high risk for getting coronavirus, and if you do get it you are likely to recover. Ninety-eight, 99 percent of people are going to fully recover.”

                        US News and World Report, and Richardo Alonso-Zaldivar of Associated Press: “For most people, the virus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough.”

                        New York Times Dr. David Katz: Is Our Fight Against Coronavirus Worse Than the Disease? "As much as 99 percent of active cases in the general population are ‘mild’ and do not require specific medical treatment. The small percentage of cases that do require such services are highly concentrated among those age 60 and older, and further so the older people are.”

                        Web MD, Kathleen Doheny: The fatality rate from COVID-19 is not as high as experts have reported, according to a new analysis published Monday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

                        Dr. Fauci in the New England Journal of Medicine: “…the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%)…”

                        Dr. Peter Hotez: “Historically travel bans tend not to work very well, they tend to be counter productive.”

                        New York Times, Rosie Spinks: Who Says It’s Not Safe to Travel to China? The coronavirus travel ban is unjust and doesn’t work anyway. “The coronavirus outbreak seems defined by two opposing forces: the astonishing efficiency with which the travel industry connects the world and a political moment dominated by xenophobic rhetoric and the building of walls.”

                        New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio: "I'm encouraging New Yorkers to go on with your lives: get out on the town despite Coronavirus.”

                        Oxiris Barbot, New York City health commissioner: People “who had recently traveled from Wuhan were not being urged to self-quarantine or avoid large public gatherings.” “There is no reason not to take the subway, not to take the bus, not to go out to your favorite restaurant, and certainly not to miss the parade next Sunday.”

                        House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged people to visit San Francisco’s Chinatown. "That’s what we’re trying to do today is to say everything is fine here. Come because precautions have been taken. The city is on top of the situation."

                        Mayor of Florence Dario Nardella: Suggested residents hug Chinese people to encourage them in the fight against the novel coronavirus.


                      https://justthenews.com/politics-pol...-comments-they

                      It should also be noted that as late as February 28th the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine published a paper saying that the virus seemed to be much less severe than other recent outbreaks of respiratory illnesses and would likely be no worse than a severe flu season:

                      Source: Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China


                      The overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.



                      Source

                      © Copyright Original Source


                      I'm always still in trouble again

                      "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                      "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                      Comment


                      • It appears Nashville's Mayor is fudging the numbers of cases due to bars and restaurants in order to keep them shut down.


                        COVID-19 emails from Nashville mayor's office show disturbing revelation

                        he coronavirus cases on lower Broadway may have been so low that the mayor’s office and the Metro Health Department decided to keep it secret.

                        Emails between the mayor’s senior advisor and the health department reveal only a partial picture. But what they reveal is disturbing.

                        The discussion involves the low number of coronavirus cases emerging from bars and restaurants and how to handle that.

                        And most disturbingly, how to keep it from the public.

                        On June 30th, contact tracing was given a small view of coronavirus clusters. Construction and nursing homes were found to be causing problems with more than a thousand cases traced to each category, but bars and restaurants reported just 22 cases.

                        Leslie Waller from the health department asks, “This isn’t going to be publicly released, right? Just info for Mayor’s Office?"

                        “Correct, not for public consumption,” writes senior advisor Benjamin Eagles.

                        A month later, the health department was asked point blank about the rumor there are only 80 cases traced to bars and restaurants.

                        Tennessee Lookout reporter Nate Rau asks, “The figure you gave of 'more than 80' does lead to a natural question: If there have been over 20,000 positive cases of COVID-19 in Davidson and only 80 or so are traced to restaurants and bars, doesn’t that mean restaurants and bars aren’t a very big problem?"

                        Health department official Brian Todd asked five health department officials, "Please advise how you recommend I respond. "

                        The name at the top of the response is clipped off but you may find the answer unacceptable.

                        “My two cents. We have certainly refused to give counts per bar because those numbers are low per site.

                        We could still release the total though, and then a response to the over 80 could be because that number is increasing all the time and we don’t want to say a specific number."

                        Neither the health department nor the mayor’s office would confirm the authenticity of the emails but councilmember Steve Glover had a Metro staff attorney inquire. Here’s the official answer:

                        “I was able to get verification from the Mayor’s Office and the Department of Health that these emails are real,” the staff attorney answered.

                        Glover says this is Metro Nashville orchestrating a cover up.

                        "They are fabricating information," Glover said. "They’ve blown there entire credibility Dennis. Its gone, I don’t trust a thing they say going forward ...nothing."

                        Glover says he has been contacted by an endless stream of downtown bartenders, waitresses and restaurant owners asking why would officials not release these numbers?

                        "We raised taxes 34 percent and put hundreds literally thousands of people out of work that are now worried about losing their homes, their apartments...and we did it on bogus data. That should be illegal," Glover said.

                        https://fox17.com/news/local/covid-1...TI6iE0HPZDO_uw

                        Proud Member of Da Blonde's Axis of Evil, Adam's Dirty Dozen, Dee Dee's Goon Squad, Tweb's In-Crowd, The Brood of Vipers & Exorcised by Ty & Dee Dee, and the only person who ever banned rogue06!

                        Comment


                        • Source: https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/17/europe/coronavirus-europe-who-second-wave-intl/index.html



                          WHO warns of 'very serious situation' in Europe, with 'alarming rates' of virus transmission

                          By Laura Smith-Spark and Vasco Cotovio, CNN

                          (CNN)The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that coronavirus cases are surging alarmingly in Europe, as a "very serious situation" unfolds across the continent.

                          As Covid-19 infections spike to record numbers, European governments are imposing strict local measures and weighing up further lockdowns in a bid to halt a second wave of the pandemic.
                          But WHO regional director Hans Kluge said at a Thursday news conference that the increase in cases should serve as a warning of what is to come.
                          "Weekly cases have now exceeded those reported when the pandemic first peaked in Europe in March," Kluge said. "Last week, the region's weekly tally exceeded 300,000 patients."

                          More than half of European nations have reported an increase of more than 10% in new cases in the past two weeks, Kluge added. "Of those, seven countries have seen newly reported cases increase more than two-fold in the same period," he said.

                          "In the spring and early summer we were able to see the impact of strict lockdown measures. Our efforts, our sacrifices, paid off. In June cases hit an all-time low. The September case numbers, however, should serve as a wake-up call for all of us," he said.

                          "Although these numbers reflect more comprehensive testing, it also shows alarming rates of transmission across the region."

                          While there was an increase in cases in older age groups, those aged 50 to 79, in the first week of September, Kluge said, the biggest proportion of new cases is still among 25- to 49-year-olds.
                          Countries across the continent have been easing lockdowns and reopening their economies, but governments are now scrambling to avert further outbreaks.

                          "This pandemic has taken so much from us," Kluge said, citing the nearly 4.9 million recorded Covid-19 cases in Europe and more than 226,000 deaths. "And this tells only part of the story," he said. "The impact on our mental health, economies, livelihoods and society has been monumental."

                          © Copyright Original Source

                          Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                          Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                          But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                          go with the flow the river knows . . .

                          Frank

                          I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                            [ATTACH=CONFIG]48121[/ATTACH]

                            It should also be noted that as late as February 28th the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine published a paper saying that the virus seemed to be much less severe than other recent outbreaks of respiratory illnesses and would likely be no worse than a severe flu season:

                            Source: Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China


                            The overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.



                            Source

                            © Copyright Original Source

                            Yeah, it's dangerous to suggest that the virus might be less deadly than expected, when you have a president who will take that as a reason to not make any preparations for the possibility that it could be more deadly than expected.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]48121[/ATTACH]

                              It should also be noted that as late as February 28th the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine published a paper saying that the virus seemed to be much less severe than other recent outbreaks of respiratory illnesses and would likely be no worse than a severe flu season:

                              Source: Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China


                              The overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.



                              Source

                              © Copyright Original Source

                              Still unanswered. Did Trump release the briefings to the public and Congress that he based his conclusions that the COVID-19 was a very dangerous, and more deadly than any flu in January?. . . and ah lied to the public and withheld the knowledge.
                              Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                              Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                              But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                              go with the flow the river knows . . .

                              Frank

                              I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post

                                Still unanswered. Did Trump release the briefings to the public and Congress that he based his conclusions that the COVID-19 was a very dangerous, and more deadly than any flu in January?. . . and ah lied to the public and withheld the knowledge.
                                He said that it was dangerous in the SOTU address, did he not? What date was that again?
                                That's what
                                - She

                                Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals
                                - Manya the Holy Szin (The Quintara Marathon)

                                I may not be as old as dirt, but me and dirt are starting to have an awful lot in common
                                Stephen R. Donaldson

                                Comment

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