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Alaska Pox!

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  • Alaska Pox!

    Named because it originated in Alaska.

    Source: https://www.npr.org/2024/02/14/1231437886/alaskapox-virus-death-cases


    A man died from Alaskapox last month. Here's what we know about the virus

    Alaska health officials reported last week that a man died in January after contracting a virus known as Alaskapox.

    The disease was first discovered in a person living near Fairbanks, Alaska, in 2015, and there have been several known infections since then.

    But officials believe that last month's case is the first fatality from the newly discovered virus — as well as the first knowncase outside the state's interior — and authorities are now urging doctors across the state to be on the lookout for signs of the disease.

    Still, authorities note that immunocompromised people may be at a higher risk for severe illness from the virus, and so far the only known cases of Alaskapox have been detected within the state.

    What is Alaskapox?

    Alaskapox is a type of orthopoxvirus that infects mammals, including humans, and causes skin lesions. Other orthopoxviruses include the now-eradicated smallpox virus as well as mpox, which was previously known as monkeypox and experienced an outbreak of thousands of cases worldwide in 2022.

    "Orthopoxviruses are zoonotic viruses, meaning that they circulate primarily within animal populations with spill over into humans occasionally," said Centers for Disease Control and Prevention epidemiologist Julia Rogers, as reported by Alaska Public Media.

    Alaska's Division of Public Health says the virus has been found primarily in small animals in the Fairbanks area, such as shrews and red-backed voles.

    Patients typically have one or more skin lesions and can also develop swollen lymph nodes and joint or muscle pain.

    What do we know about the reported Alaskapox cases?

    There have been seven known infections in Alaska since 2015, including last month's fatality. Six of the infections were detected in the Fairbanks area, while the man who died last month was from a forested area of the Kenai Peninsula.

    The patient who was hospitalized and later died was an "elderly man" who lived alone and was immunocompromised from cancer treatment, which "likely contributed" to the severity of his illness, officials say.

    The man also told health officials that he gardened in his backyard and took care of a stray cat, which hunted small animals nearby and would frequently scratch him. The cat tested negative for orthopoxvirus.

    Officials believe there have been more cases of Alaskapox in humans that weren't caught.

    Rogers, the epidemiologist, said she expects Alaskapox infections to remain rare.

    Most patients who had documented cases of Alaskapox suffered mild illnesses that cleared up on their own after a few weeks.

    Can I get Alaskapox from another person?

    It's unclear.

    To date, no human-to-human transmission has been documented, Alaska's Department of Health says.

    It also notes that some orthopoxviruses can be passed on via contact with skin lesions.

    Pet cats and dogs may also spread the virus.

    "We are not sure exactly how the virus spreads from animals to people but contact with small mammals and potentially domestic pets who come into contact [with] small wild mammals could play a role," the Division of Public Health says on its website.

    Health officials encourage people with lesions potentially caused by Alaskapox to keep them covered with a bandage.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people keep a safe distance from wildlife and wash their hands after being outside.

    What's being done to respond to the Alaskapox cases?

    The first six cases of Alaskapox were discovered in the Fairbanks area, but the more recent case occurred in the Kenai Peninsula, indicating that the virus is more geographically widespread in the state than previously known.

    The Alaska Section of Epidemiology, along with the CDC and the University of Alaska Museum, are working outside the state's interior region to test small mammals for the virus.

    State health officials are also urging Alaska doctors to familiarize themselves with the symptoms of Alaskapox and report any suspected cases to the Section of Epidemiology.

    © Copyright Original Source





  • #2
    We need to shut down the country pronto, and make everyone vote by mail for the upcoming election!

    Comment


    • #3
      Alaskapox and Measles currently seem to be neck-and-neck. Though I'm still putting my money on bird flu.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by seanD View Post
        Alaskapox and Measles currently seem to be neck-and-neck. Though I'm still putting my money on bird flu.
        Still fearmongering? Didn't you agree that end of 2023 was your deadline for admitting you were wrong if the country wasn't being shut down again due to a new pandemic? Did you learn nothing from such failures of prediction and still continue to fearmonger?
        "I hate him passionately", he's "a demonic force" - Tucker Carlson, in private, on Donald Trump
        "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism" - George Orwell
        "[Capitalism] as it exists today is, in my opinion, the real source of evils. I am convinced there is only one way to eliminate these grave evils, namely through the establishment of a socialist economy" - Albert Einstein

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Starlight View Post
          Still fearmongering? Didn't you agree that end of 2023 was your deadline for admitting you were wrong if the country wasn't being shut down again due to a new pandemic? Did you learn nothing from such failures of prediction and still continue to fearmonger?
          What are talking about? I was correct. We had another "new variant" and more fearmongering in 2023. Granted, it wasn't as pervasive as 2020 (mostly because folks aren't buying this BS anymore, including the covid cult), but there were still mandates once again in certain democrat areas, including my state. They tried to fearmonger everyone into getting more boosters, and it was an embarrassing flop. In fact, since democrats love government authoritarianism, I'm even more convinced now than I was then that there will be more crisis events that the democrats will exploit and use as an excuse for more government authoritarianism.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by seanD View Post

            What are talking about? I was correct. We had another "new variant" and more fearmongering in 2023. Granted, it wasn't as pervasive as 2020 (mostly because folks aren't buying this BS anymore, including the covid cult), but there were still mandates once again in certain democrat areas, including my state. They tried to fearmonger everyone into getting more boosters, and it was an embarrassing flop. In fact, since democrats love government authoritarianism, I'm even more convinced now than I was then that there will be more crisis events that the democrats will exploit and use as an excuse for more government authoritarianism.
            Yes karen.
            My brethren, do not hold your faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ with an attitude of personal favoritism. James 2:1

            If anyone thinks himself to be religious, and yet does not  bridle his tongue but deceives his own heart, this man’s religion is worthless James 1:26

            This you know, my beloved brethren. But everyone must be quick to hear, slow to speak and slow to anger; James 1:19

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

              Yes karen.
              For the sarcastically impaired the following is said in jest

              Great rebuttal.

              P1) If , then I win.

              P2)

              C) I win.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CivilDiscourse View Post
                Named because it originated in Alaska.

                Source: https://www.npr.org/2024/02/14/1231437886/alaskapox-virus-death-cases


                A man died from Alaskapox last month. Here's what we know about the virus

                Alaska health officials reported last week that a man died in January after contracting a virus known as Alaskapox.

                The disease was first discovered in a person living near Fairbanks, Alaska, in 2015, and there have been several known infections since then.

                But officials believe that last month's case is the first fatality from the newly discovered virus — as well as the first knowncase outside the state's interior — and authorities are now urging doctors across the state to be on the lookout for signs of the disease.

                Still, authorities note that immunocompromised people may be at a higher risk for severe illness from the virus, and so far the only known cases of Alaskapox have been detected within the state.

                What is Alaskapox?

                Alaskapox is a type of orthopoxvirus that infects mammals, including humans, and causes skin lesions. Other orthopoxviruses include the now-eradicated smallpox virus as well as mpox, which was previously known as monkeypox and experienced an outbreak of thousands of cases worldwide in 2022.

                "Orthopoxviruses are zoonotic viruses, meaning that they circulate primarily within animal populations with spill over into humans occasionally," said Centers for Disease Control and Prevention epidemiologist Julia Rogers, as reported by Alaska Public Media.

                Alaska's Division of Public Health says the virus has been found primarily in small animals in the Fairbanks area, such as shrews and red-backed voles.

                Patients typically have one or more skin lesions and can also develop swollen lymph nodes and joint or muscle pain.

                What do we know about the reported Alaskapox cases?

                There have been seven known infections in Alaska since 2015, including last month's fatality. Six of the infections were detected in the Fairbanks area, while the man who died last month was from a forested area of the Kenai Peninsula.

                The patient who was hospitalized and later died was an "elderly man" who lived alone and was immunocompromised from cancer treatment, which "likely contributed" to the severity of his illness, officials say.

                The man also told health officials that he gardened in his backyard and took care of a stray cat, which hunted small animals nearby and would frequently scratch him. The cat tested negative for orthopoxvirus.

                Officials believe there have been more cases of Alaskapox in humans that weren't caught.

                Rogers, the epidemiologist, said she expects Alaskapox infections to remain rare.

                Most patients who had documented cases of Alaskapox suffered mild illnesses that cleared up on their own after a few weeks.

                Can I get Alaskapox from another person?

                It's unclear.

                To date, no human-to-human transmission has been documented, Alaska's Department of Health says.

                It also notes that some orthopoxviruses can be passed on via contact with skin lesions.

                Pet cats and dogs may also spread the virus.

                "We are not sure exactly how the virus spreads from animals to people but contact with small mammals and potentially domestic pets who come into contact [with] small wild mammals could play a role," the Division of Public Health says on its website.

                Health officials encourage people with lesions potentially caused by Alaskapox to keep them covered with a bandage.

                The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people keep a safe distance from wildlife and wash their hands after being outside.

                What's being done to respond to the Alaskapox cases?

                The first six cases of Alaskapox were discovered in the Fairbanks area, but the more recent case occurred in the Kenai Peninsula, indicating that the virus is more geographically widespread in the state than previously known.

                The Alaska Section of Epidemiology, along with the CDC and the University of Alaska Museum, are working outside the state's interior region to test small mammals for the virus.

                State health officials are also urging Alaska doctors to familiarize themselves with the symptoms of Alaskapox and report any suspected cases to the Section of Epidemiology.

                © Copyright Original Source



                Looking at the responses, all one can say is that this site is populated by fools.

                Staying on top of novel infectious disease is critical to all of us. Alaskapox does not appear to normally cause serious diseas le, but is in the same family as smallpox. So keeping aware of it is critical, especially since for the last 9 years it has been confined to the fairbanks area, but now shows up in kenai/Juneau.

                My brethren, do not hold your faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ with an attitude of personal favoritism. James 2:1

                If anyone thinks himself to be religious, and yet does not  bridle his tongue but deceives his own heart, this man’s religion is worthless James 1:26

                This you know, my beloved brethren. But everyone must be quick to hear, slow to speak and slow to anger; James 1:19

                Comment


                • #9
                  Alaska Pox, huh? How long before some liberal condemns the name as being offensive to native Alaskans and demands it be called by its scientific designation?
                  Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
                  But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
                  Than a fool in the eyes of God


                  From "Fools Gold" by Petra

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post
                    Looking at the responses, all one can say is that this site is populated by fools.
                    Don't worry, you fit right in.
                    Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
                    But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
                    Than a fool in the eyes of God


                    From "Fools Gold" by Petra

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

                      Looking at the responses, all one can say is that this site is populated by fools.
                      Blimey! Have you only just found out?

                      Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

                      Staying on top of novel infectious disease is critical to all of us. Alaskapox does not appear to normally cause serious diseas le, but is in the same family as smallpox. So keeping aware of it is critical, especially since for the last 9 years it has been confined to the fairbanks area, but now shows up in kenai/Juneau.
                      Seriously, I agree with you that these diseases need to be monitored. Viruses can also, on occasion, mutate very quickly and as the article notes, orthopoxviruses are also also zoonotic. So caution and a responsible approach should be the way forward.
                      "It ain't necessarily so
                      The things that you're liable
                      To read in the Bible
                      It ain't necessarily so
                      ."

                      Sportin' Life
                      Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

                        Looking at the responses, all one can say is that this site is populated by fools.
                        Takes one to know one.



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Never let an election year go without a crisis and never let a crisis go to waste.
                          P1) If , then I win.

                          P2)

                          C) I win.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sparko View Post
                            Takes one to know one.

                            Actually, in the case of fools, not so much ;)

                            But the very first step to not being a fool is in considering the possibility one might be one. part of being fool is being unwilling to seriously consider wher one might be wrong.

                            In this case, the responses are foolishly dismissing the very necessary task of monitoring new diseases, dismissing the serious work of those with medical training that keep up with biological threats to our lives.

                            They also represent deep paranoia on the topic, another characteristic of fools, believing wild stories not based in fact while at the same time ignoring the information available from those with deep knowledge of the subject matter.
                            Last edited by oxmixmudd; 02-21-2024, 03:03 PM.
                            My brethren, do not hold your faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ with an attitude of personal favoritism. James 2:1

                            If anyone thinks himself to be religious, and yet does not  bridle his tongue but deceives his own heart, this man’s religion is worthless James 1:26

                            This you know, my beloved brethren. But everyone must be quick to hear, slow to speak and slow to anger; James 1:19

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wanted to be the first to point out that Fairbanks is the home of the State of Alaska Virology Laboratory.

                              Just sayin'...

                              Comment

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