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Biden’s physical takes on renewed importance after Hur revelations

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  • Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

    But he's so REASONABLE about scooters!
    Well, he did say he was close to Biden's age, so maybe he needs to take a cognitive test.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Sparko View Post

      Well, he did say he was close to Biden's age, so maybe he needs to take a cognitive test.
      I keep forgetting eider is as old as he is since he often comes across as less mature than my 15 year old daughter.
      Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
      But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
      Than a fool in the eyes of God


      From "Fools Gold" by Petra

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Sparko View Post

        Eider seems to be the site's premier strawman builder and attacker.
        Nah! That's you.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

          In pretty much every other criminal trial in the country, this would be grounds for a mistrial.
          What? Refusing to support cops kneeling on suspect's necks until death? Or insisting that Black lives do matter? Looks fairly reasonable to me.

          Tell me, if you were selected to be a juror in a crimal trial against, say, a Muslim man, would you declare your prejudices to the court and seek to be recused?
          Though not.......

          Comment


          • Originally posted by eider View Post
            What? Refusing to support cops kneeling on suspect's necks until death? Or insisting that Black lives do matter?
            Try reading -- it was about a juror who flat out lied about his involvement with BLM during voir dire. It's unethical and illegal.

            Looks fairly reasonable to me.
            This does not surprise me in the least.

            Tell me, if you were selected to be a juror in a crimal trial against,
            You don't understand the process - you are not "selected to be a juror" until voir dire is over.

            say, a Muslim man, would you declare your prejudices to the court and seek to be recused?
            Though not.......
            I would answer all questions honestly. This dude flat out lied. You support liars.

            The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by eider View Post

              What? Refusing to support cops kneeling on suspect's necks until death? Or insisting that Black lives do matter? Looks fairly reasonable to me.

              Tell me, if you were selected to be a juror in a crimal trial against, say, a Muslim man, would you declare your prejudices to the court and seek to be recused?
              Though not.......
              The juror made it clear that he had already decided that he was guilty before ever hearing any evidence. That is hardly trial by a fair and impartial jury. It is quite literally the opposite.

              Still, no surprise that you think its grand given the prominent authoritarian streak you proudly display.

              I'm always still in trouble again

              "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
              "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
              "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

              Comment


              • Originally posted by eider View Post

                Nah! That's you.
                Looks like someone has thrown his hat into the ring and is running for being Tweb's Peewee Herman

                I'm always still in trouble again

                "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                Comment


                • From Puck, which is rated center-left:

                  *Single use of somewhat strong language*

                  The Age of Biden
                  For better or worse, many in the WH press corps have spent the last couple years noticeably avoiding the topic of the president’s agility and acuity because it felt indelicate or irrelevant. Now, the Hur report has stirred some soul-searching.

                  Swift fly the years, and it’s hard to believe it’s been almost two turns of the calendar since David Axelrod earned the ire of the president, the White House, and the Democratic establishment by warning, in the pages of The New York Times, that Joe Biden’s age would be a liability in 2024. In a June 2022 interview with the paper, the famed chief strategist of Obama’s victorious presidential campaigns made the rather obvious point that “the presidency is a monstrously taxing job,” and the very rational observation that Biden, “who looks his age and isn’t as agile in front of a camera as he once was,” would be “closer to 90 than 80 at the end of a second term, and that would be a major issue.” For his sins, White House surrogates chastised Axelrod while Biden privately called him “a prick.”

                  Last Thursday, after Robert Hur’s report clearing Biden of wrongdoing in the classified materials investigation was subsumed by his commentary on the president’s acuity, I texted a producer at CNN to gauge their coverage plans for the evening. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, Axelrod had been booked for the majority of primetime. Of course, his attempts to underscore the political significance of the report, which he described as “a shiv” into Biden’s reelection campaign, contended with the president’s loyalists, who sought to direct attention elsewhere. These pals, true believers, and surrogates criticized Hur—a Republican with an agenda!—for cosplaying as a neurologist and reiterated the familiar Trump-inflected whataboutism—juxtaposing Biden with another elderly, misremembering man who also happens to be an aspiring fascist facing 91 felony charges. These arguments were even more audible over on MSNBC.

                  And so it went in subsequent days. Biden advisers and surrogates also tended to utilize another familiar, imperfect argument: Behind closed doors, where it matters, the president is sharp, detail-oriented, on top of it, and in full control of his faculties, they insist. This talking point has become an exhausting refrain: I heard it Sunday on Meet the Press from Biden senior adviser Mitch Landrieu (“This guy is tough, he’s smart, he’s on his game”) and Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas (“He is sharp, intensely probing, and detail-oriented and focused”). And I heard it again over breakfast on Monday morning from a source very close to Biden.

                  And while this depiction of Biden may be true, it’s an impossible argument to win because it inherently contradicts what many Americans just watched, themselves. As Jon Stewart astutely pointed out in his return to The Daily Show on Monday, why can’t the White House put that sharp, focused, and on-top-of-it version of Biden on camera? Of late, the White House has avoided every opportunity to do so, even opting out of the traditional Super Bowl pregame interview.

                  I’m not here to validate a cable news disagreement. Of course, both arguments are flawed. The presidency is an office, and Biden is surrounded by brilliant and capable people who help guide his decision-making and have led the country out of Covid, aligned NATO against Russia, passed historic infrastructure, manufacturing, gun-safety, and inflation-reduction legislation, and facilitated economic growth of 3.3 percent in the most recent quarter. And yet, this isn’t—or shouldn’t be—a binary issue. Just because Biden defeated Trump in a once-in-a-lifetime election, which featured mail-in voting during a pandemic, doesn’t mean he alone can defeat him now. The Republican Party establishment seemed to do everything in its power to line up contenders as alternatives to Trump. The Democratic machine is openly hostile to any contemplation of another option and, as the Axelrod affair demonstrates, gets seriously pissed at anyone with the temerity to break rank.

                  That all now appears to be shifting. For better or worse, it is now open season on the question of Biden’s age. And that is largely because, as Axelrod himself pointed out, “the most damaging things in politics are the things that confirm people’s pre-existing suspicions.” Only in this case, it’s not so much a suspicion as a perceptible and audible fact. The president obviously looks and sounds like he’s lost a step—understandably so!—and neither the gratuity of Hur’s report nor the myriad threats posed by a second Trump presidency can negate it. And this all has a number of journalists covering the president second-guessing some of their reporting decisions and looking at their subject with fresh eyes.

                  Behind Closed Doors

                  This week, I surveyed members of the White House press corps—reporters, on-air correspondents, photographers, etcetera—and they all emphasized that the symptoms of Biden’s age had become more noticeable in recent months and a frequent discussion topic at the desks behind the Brady briefing room. “Anyone who covers this White House knows he’s showing the signs of his age—he whispers, he shuffles, he misremembers,” one White House reporter told me. “Anyone with an elderly parent knows what this is.”

                  Since the beginning of Biden’s term, many White House journalists have reported on, or alluded to, concerns surrounding Biden’s age in often gentle or euphemistic ways. Nevertheless, several of the journalists I spoke with said the true significance and importance of that issue, as they observed it, was not reflected in the coverage—often due to the sense that it was sensitive or unseemly, or because there was no obvious evidence that it had affected his performance as president beyond optics. Or, left unsaid, perhaps because they didn’t want to ruin their relationship with the White House by being the lone wolf to speak up.“It was something that felt indelicate to talk about,” one member of the White House press corps told me. In retrospect, some journalists felt like it probably warranted more coverage: “The amount of time we spent talking about it versus the time we spent reporting on it was not the same,” one of the reporters said. “There should have been tougher, more scrutinizing coverage of his age earlier.”

                  The Hur report has obviouslygiven the press corps greater license to cover the issue—in the same way, one journalist noted, that the Monica Lewinsky scandal gave the White House press corps greater license to talk about the flirtatious behavior they’d witnessed Bill Clinton exhibiting toward some women, but never felt like they had the freedom to write about in their pages. And, as one reporter noted, the problem with the age issue is that it only moves in one direction: “It’s not just the next nine months,” this reporter said. “It’s potentially the next five years.”

                  Whatever the case, Biden’s age is now a thing, an enduring thing, a challenge for the administration and campaign, and a test for news organizations trying to be honest brokers without losing sight of the fact that, yes, Trump’s myriad things—the criminal charges, the demagoguery, the disregard for the electoral process, and his own age-related verbal peculiarities—are national risks of a whole other magnitude. Still, as Stewart noted on The Daily Show, “The stakes of this election don’t make Donald Trump’s opponent less subject to scrutiny; it actually makes him more subject to scrutiny.”
                  Stewart explained his logic with a rather amusing Conan the Barbarian analogy, but it effectively amounts to this: If you’re among those who support Biden and believe that Trump presents an existential threat to American democracy, you should be even more concerned about the vigor of the one man who stands between him and the White House. At the very least, you certainly shouldn’t be pretending like the conversation is unwarranted. Time does fly, and it’ll be November before you know it.


                  All boldening in original.

                  Obviously, if he's reelected it won't be an issue just for the next nine months but the next five years because he is not getting younger or better. He will only get worse. And worse.

                  And it won't be "indelicate" to bring it up but rather a dereliction of their journalistic duty.

                  Backdoor

                  I'm always still in trouble again

                  "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                  "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                  "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
                    I would answer all questions honestly. This dude flat out lied. You support liars.
                    Says you.

                    Will you support Mr Trump?

                    Comment


                    • Given my suspicions that several who post regularly to these boards are in, or approaching, the "autumn years" of their lives, the following posted on 14 February might make interesting reading.

                      I could joke that I forgot to post it on the day it appeared!

                      https://theconversation.com/why-forg...o-worry-223284

                      Forgetting in our day to day lives may feel annoying or, as we get older, a little frightening. But it is an entirely normal part of memory – enabling us to move on or make space for new information.

                      In fact, our memories aren’t as reliable as we may think. But what level of forgetting is actually normal? Is it OK to mix up the names of countries, as US president Joe Biden recently did? Let’s take a look at the evidence.

                      When we remember something, our brains need to learn it (encode), keep it safe (store) and recover it when needed (retrieve). Forgetting can occur at any point in this process.

                      When sensory information first comes in to the brain we can’t process it all. We instead use our attention to filter the information so that what’s important can be identified and processed. That process means that when we are encoding our experiences we are mostly encoding the things we are paying attention to.
                      We want to ensure the knowledge of scientists reaches millions. Join us.

                      Get newsletter
                      If someone introduces themselves at a dinner party at the same time as we’re paying attention to something else, we never encode their name. It’s a failure of memory (forgetting), but it’s entirely normal and very common.

                      Habits and structure, such as always putting our keys in the same place so we don’t have to encode their location, can help us get around this problem.

                      Rehearsal is also important for memory. If we don’t use it, we lose it. Memories that last the longest are the ones we’ve rehearsed and retold many times (although we often adapt the memory with every retelling, and likely remember the last rehearsal rather than the actual event itself).

                      In the 1880s, German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus taught people nonsense syllables they had never heard before, and looked at how much they remembered over time. He showed that, without rehearsal, most of our memory fades within a day or two.

                      However, if people rehearsed the syllables by having them repeated at regular intervals, this drastically increased the number of syllables that could be remembered for more than just a day.

                      This need for rehearsal can be another cause of every day forgetting, however. When we go to the supermarket we might encode where we park the car, but when we enter the shop we are busy rehearsing other things we need to remember (our shopping list). As a result, we may forget the location of the car.



                      Some have raised concerns about Joe Biden’s memory. Paul Froggatt/Shutterstock

                      However, this shows us another feature of forgetting. We can forget specific information, but remember the gist.

                      When we walk out of the shop and realise that we don’t remember where we parked the car, we can probably remember whether it was to the left or right of the shop door, on the edge of the car park or towards the centre though. So rather than having to walk round the entire car park to find it, we can search a relatively defined area.
                      The impact of ageing


                      As people get older, they worry about their memory more. It’s true that our forgetting becomes more pronounced, but that doesn’t always mean there’s a problem.

                      The longer we live, the more experiences we have, and the more we have to remember. Not only that, but the experiences have much in common, meaning it can become tricky to separate these events in our memory.

                      If you’ve only ever experienced a holiday on a beach in Spain once you will remember it with great clarity. However, if you’ve been on many holidays to Spain, in different cities at different times, then remembering whether something happened in the first holiday you took to Barcelona or the second, or whether your brother came with you on the holiday to Majorca or Ibiza, becomes more challenging.

                      Overlap between memories, or interference, gets in the way of retrieving information. Imagine filing documents on your computer. As you start the process, you have a clear filing system where you can easily place each document so you know where to find it.

                      But as more and more documents come in, it gets hard to decide which of the folders it belongs to. You may also start putting lots of documents in one folder because they all relate to that item.

                      This means that, over time, it becomes hard to retrieve the right document when you need it either because you can’t work out where you put it, or because you know where it should be but there are lots of other things there to search through.

                      It can be disruptive to not forget. Post traumatic stress disorder is an example of a situation in which people can not forget. The memory is persistent, doesn’t fade and often interrupts daily life.

                      There can be similar experiences with persistent memories in grief or depression, conditions which can make it harder to forget negative information. Here, forgetting would be extremely useful.
                      Forgetting doesn’t always impair decision making


                      So forgetting things is common, and as we get older it becomes more common. But forgetting names or dates, as Biden has, doesn’t necessarily impair decision making. Older people can have deep knowledge and good intuition, which can help counteract such memory lapses.

                      Of course, at times forgetting can be a sign of a bigger problem and might suggest you need to speak to the doctor. Asking the same questions over and over again is a sign that forgetting is more than just a problem of being distracted when you tried to encode it.

                      Similarly, forgetting your way round very familiar areas is another sign that you are struggling to use cues in the environment to remind you of how to get around. And while forgetting the name of someone at dinner is normal, forgetting how to use your fork and knife isn’t.

                      Ultimately, forgetting isn’t something to fear – in ourselves or others. It is usually extreme when it’s a sign things are going wrong.

                      "It ain't necessarily so
                      The things that you're liable
                      To read in the Bible
                      It ain't necessarily so
                      ."

                      Sportin' Life
                      Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
                        Given my suspicions that several who post regularly to these boards are in, or approaching, the "autumn years" of their lives, the following posted on 14 February might make interesting reading.

                        I could joke that I forgot to post it on the day it appeared!


                        In other words, pay no attention to Biden's obvious cognitive decline. Americans are generally asked who is the current President and what is the current year when cognitive decline is suspected. Biden has failed both of those. His speech and other behaviour would readily be considered cognitive decline in anyone else. The Conversation is merely showing its bias.
                        P1) If , then I win.

                        P2)

                        C) I win.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
                          Given my suspicions that several who post regularly to these boards are in, or approaching, the "autumn years" of their lives, the following posted on 14 February might make interesting reading.

                          I could joke that I forgot to post it on the day it appeared!

                          https://theconversation.com/why-forg...o-worry-223284

                          Forgetting in our day to day lives may feel annoying or, as we get older, a little frightening. But it is an entirely normal part of memory – enabling us to move on or make space for new information.

                          In fact, our memories aren’t as reliable as we may think. But what level of forgetting is actually normal? Is it OK to mix up the names of countries, as US president Joe Biden recently did? Let’s take a look at the evidence.

                          When we remember something, our brains need to learn it (encode), keep it safe (store) and recover it when needed (retrieve). Forgetting can occur at any point in this process.

                          When sensory information first comes in to the brain we can’t process it all. We instead use our attention to filter the information so that what’s important can be identified and processed. That process means that when we are encoding our experiences we are mostly encoding the things we are paying attention to.
                          We want to ensure the knowledge of scientists reaches millions. Join us.

                          Get newsletter
                          If someone introduces themselves at a dinner party at the same time as we’re paying attention to something else, we never encode their name. It’s a failure of memory (forgetting), but it’s entirely normal and very common.

                          Habits and structure, such as always putting our keys in the same place so we don’t have to encode their location, can help us get around this problem.

                          Rehearsal is also important for memory. If we don’t use it, we lose it. Memories that last the longest are the ones we’ve rehearsed and retold many times (although we often adapt the memory with every retelling, and likely remember the last rehearsal rather than the actual event itself).

                          In the 1880s, German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus taught people nonsense syllables they had never heard before, and looked at how much they remembered over time. He showed that, without rehearsal, most of our memory fades within a day or two.

                          However, if people rehearsed the syllables by having them repeated at regular intervals, this drastically increased the number of syllables that could be remembered for more than just a day.

                          This need for rehearsal can be another cause of every day forgetting, however. When we go to the supermarket we might encode where we park the car, but when we enter the shop we are busy rehearsing other things we need to remember (our shopping list). As a result, we may forget the location of the car.



                          Some have raised concerns about Joe Biden’s memory. Paul Froggatt/Shutterstock

                          However, this shows us another feature of forgetting. We can forget specific information, but remember the gist.

                          When we walk out of the shop and realise that we don’t remember where we parked the car, we can probably remember whether it was to the left or right of the shop door, on the edge of the car park or towards the centre though. So rather than having to walk round the entire car park to find it, we can search a relatively defined area.
                          The impact of ageing


                          As people get older, they worry about their memory more. It’s true that our forgetting becomes more pronounced, but that doesn’t always mean there’s a problem.

                          The longer we live, the more experiences we have, and the more we have to remember. Not only that, but the experiences have much in common, meaning it can become tricky to separate these events in our memory.

                          If you’ve only ever experienced a holiday on a beach in Spain once you will remember it with great clarity. However, if you’ve been on many holidays to Spain, in different cities at different times, then remembering whether something happened in the first holiday you took to Barcelona or the second, or whether your brother came with you on the holiday to Majorca or Ibiza, becomes more challenging.

                          Overlap between memories, or interference, gets in the way of retrieving information. Imagine filing documents on your computer. As you start the process, you have a clear filing system where you can easily place each document so you know where to find it.

                          But as more and more documents come in, it gets hard to decide which of the folders it belongs to. You may also start putting lots of documents in one folder because they all relate to that item.

                          This means that, over time, it becomes hard to retrieve the right document when you need it either because you can’t work out where you put it, or because you know where it should be but there are lots of other things there to search through.

                          It can be disruptive to not forget. Post traumatic stress disorder is an example of a situation in which people can not forget. The memory is persistent, doesn’t fade and often interrupts daily life.

                          There can be similar experiences with persistent memories in grief or depression, conditions which can make it harder to forget negative information. Here, forgetting would be extremely useful.
                          Forgetting doesn’t always impair decision making


                          So forgetting things is common, and as we get older it becomes more common. But forgetting names or dates, as Biden has, doesn’t necessarily impair decision making. Older people can have deep knowledge and good intuition, which can help counteract such memory lapses.

                          Of course, at times forgetting can be a sign of a bigger problem and might suggest you need to speak to the doctor. Asking the same questions over and over again is a sign that forgetting is more than just a problem of being distracted when you tried to encode it.

                          Similarly, forgetting your way round very familiar areas is another sign that you are struggling to use cues in the environment to remind you of how to get around. And while forgetting the name of someone at dinner is normal, forgetting how to use your fork and knife isn’t.

                          Ultimately, forgetting isn’t something to fear – in ourselves or others. It is usually extreme when it’s a sign things are going wrong.
                          Of course, during the Trump era you and others were singing a different tune.

                          https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...es#post1058729

                          You were recommending amazon products focused on Trump's "cognitive abilities"

                          It seems once again you are pushing opinions you don't really believe.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by eider View Post

                            Says you.

                            Will you support Mr Trump?
                            Only if he is the only option to defeat a pinko commie leftist 'progressive'.
                            The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Diogenes View Post


                              In other words, pay no attention to Biden's obvious cognitive decline. Americans are generally asked who is the current President and what is the current year when cognitive decline is suspected. Biden has failed both of those. His speech and other behaviour would readily be considered cognitive decline in anyone else. The Conversation is merely showing its bias.
                              If you do not agree with the article, why not be honest and write as much?

                              The article was posted for information and to advise against the leaping to conclusions, which is such a popular pastime among some here on Tweb.
                              "It ain't necessarily so
                              The things that you're liable
                              To read in the Bible
                              It ain't necessarily so
                              ."

                              Sportin' Life
                              Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by CivilDiscourse View Post

                                Of course, during the Trump era you and others were singing a different tune.

                                https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...es#post1058729

                                You were recommending amazon products focused on Trump's "cognitive abilities"

                                It seems once again you are pushing opinions you don't really believe.
                                Once again your incompetence in comprehension is to the fore. I am not pushing any opinion I merely offered the article for information and to discourage the tendency to leap to conclusions.
                                "It ain't necessarily so
                                The things that you're liable
                                To read in the Bible
                                It ain't necessarily so
                                ."

                                Sportin' Life
                                Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                                Comment

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