Announcement

Collapse

Civics 101 Guidelines

Want to argue about politics? Healthcare reform? Taxes? Governments? You've come to the right place!

Try to keep it civil though. The rules still apply here.
See more
See less

Elizabeth II

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Elizabeth II

    News today indicates that The Queen’s health is failing. Well wishers from around the globe unite in sympathy for the Royal family. The Queen is under medical supervision at Balmoral.
    “I think God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.” ― Oscar Wilde
    “And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence” ― Bertrand Russell
    “not all there” - you know who you are

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post
    Is the Anglican church really a church, though? I understand it is more of a façade.
    It is the state religion - as I understand it, the only western country to actually have one. Normally such things are associated with Islamic nations.

    However, it appears that the Head of that state religion may be on her death bed.


    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...ctors-concerns

    Doctors have expressed concern for the Queen’s health and recommended she remain under medical supervision, Buckingham Palace has said.

    In a statement, the palace said: “Following further evaluation this morning, the Queen’s doctors are concerned for Her Majesty’s health and have recommended she remain under medical supervision.”

    The Queen remains comfortable at Balmoral Castle.

    The Commons Speaker, Sir Lindsay Hoyle, told MPs: “I know I speak on behalf of the entire house when I say that we send our best wishes to Her Majesty the Queen and that she and the royal family are in our thoughts and prayers at this moment.”

    Concerns over the health of the 96-year-old head of state escalated when she pulled out of a virtual privy council meeting on Wednesday after doctors ordered her to rest.

    Prince Charles was at her side at her Scottish residence, and Prince William was travelling to be with her.

    A Clarence House spokesman said: “Their Royal Highnesses the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall have travelled to Balmoral.”

    A Kensington palace spokesman said: “The Duke of Cambridge is travelling to Balmoral.”

    A spokesman for Harry and Meghan said they were also travelling to Balmoral. “The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were due to attend the WellChild awards ceremony in London on Thursday evening, but have changed their plans to travel to see the Queen,” the spokesman said.

    The Earl and Countess of Wessex, and the Duke of York, were also travelling to Balmoral, while Princess Anne was already there, having been undertaking engagements in Scotland this week.

    The prime minister, Liz Truss, said: “The whole country will be deeply concerned by the news from Buckingham Palace this lunchtime.”

    “My thoughts – and the thoughts of people across our United Kingdom – are with Her Majesty The Queen and her family at this time”.

    The Queen was seen in public for the first time in several weeks when she received the outgoing and incoming prime ministers at her Scottish residence this week. She looked bright but frail, and used a walking stick during Tuesday’s audiences with Boris Johnson, who tendered his resignation, and Truss, whom she appointed as his successor.

    On Wednesday it was announced that the Queen had cancelled the planned virtual privy council meeting.

    Buckingham Palace said at the time: “After a full day yesterday, Her Majesty has this afternoon accepted doctors’ advice to rest. This means that the privy council meeting that had been due to take place this evening will be rearranged.”


    Watch this space!




    "It ain't necessarily so
    The things that you're liable
    To read in the Bible
    It ain't necessarily so
    ."

    Sportin' Life
    Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

    Comment


    • #3
      I wish the Queen a speedy recovery.

      Live coverage from the BBC.
      Last edited by Juvenal; 09-08-2022, 10:54 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
        I wish the Queen a speedy recovery.

        Live coverage from the BBC.
        The NYT is also providing live coverage (it updated as I wrote this)

        I'm always still in trouble again

        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
        "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

        Comment


        • #5
          I saw (to use her official Canadian title) Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith. several times when she visited Victoria, BC in 2002. She attended an Anglican church service on Sunday morning, and since the church was located only two blocks from my apartment I went to the church and watched her arrive (her arrival at the church was preceded by a minute or two by a car carrying four very, very large men who did a quick check before the queen arrived; I later learned that the four men were members of JTF 2, Canada's special forces unit).

          My most interesting glimpse occurred 90 minutes later. My place of employment was two blocks south of the church, so after catching a glimpse of the Queen I went to work. After the church service, she was scheduled to head to the legislature, and I knew her most likely motorcade route was directly in front of my building. When I heard police sirens, I went outside to the street, and a minute later her motorcade went by. There were no other onlookers within a block of me, and when her car went by she happened to be sitting on the side of the car that was facing me. Her car window was open, and she made eye contact with me and gave me the famous "Queen wave", so for a few seconds I was the object of her undivided attention.

          I hadn't been so excited since the time the science fiction author Isaac Asimov entered a washroom in the Anaheim Convention Center and used the urinal beside the one that I was using. But that's a tale for another time...

          God Save the Queen,
          "My favorite color in the alphabet is three." - Donald J. Trump
          "The 'J' in my middle name stands for 'Jenius'" - Donald J. Trump

          Comment


          • #6
            It is going to be the end of an era. My hope is that Harry makes it on time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Great, I can't wait for the months-long forced mourning our country is going to have to go through now. Also can't wait for this being the cover for more awful Tory proposals being forced through parliament.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by EvoUK View Post
                Great, I can't wait for the months-long forced mourning our country is going to have to go through now. Also can't wait for this being the cover for more awful Tory proposals being forced through parliament.
                It will probably give Truss a boost in the polls, at least temporarily. I'll wager Boris will be fuming that he has missed out on being centre stage!

                However, does that mean we will not be getting the fifth series of the Royal soap The Crown on Netflix?

                We were both looking forward to that in order to while away a winter evening.
                "It ain't necessarily so
                The things that you're liable
                To read in the Bible
                It ain't necessarily so
                ."

                Sportin' Life
                Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                Comment


                • #9
                  For those who are interested - and this is what The Guardian terms the long read - this is [at least some] of what Britain can look forward to. It was published in 2017 so the reference to the PM as "she" referred to Theresa May not the present incumbent, Liz Truss

                  https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-london-bridge

                  In the plans that exist for the death of the Queen – and there are many versions, held by Buckingham Palace, the government and the BBC – most envisage that she will die after a short illness. Her family and doctors will be there. When the Queen Mother passed away on the afternoon of Easter Saturday, in 2002, at the Royal Lodge in Windsor, she had time to telephone friends to say goodbye, and to give away some of her horses. In these last hours, the Queen’s senior doctor, a gastroenterologist named Professor Huw Thomas, will be in charge. He will look after his patient, control access to her room and consider what information should be made public. The bond between sovereign and subjects is a strange and mostly unknowable thing. A nation’s life becomes a person’s, and then the string must break.

                  There will be bulletins from the palace – not many, but enough. “The Queen is suffering from great physical prostration, accompanied by symptoms which cause much anxiety,” announced Sir James Reid, Queen Victoria’s physician, two days before her death in 1901. “The King’s life is moving peacefully towards its close,” was the final notice issued by George V’s doctor,Lord Dawson, at 9.30pm on the night of 20 January 1936. Not long afterwards, Dawson injected the king with 750mg of morphine and a gram of cocaine – enough to kill him twice over – in order to ease the monarch’s suffering, and to have him expire in time for the printing presses of the Times, which rolled at midnight.

                  Her eyes will be closed and Charles will be king. His siblings will kiss his hands. The first official to deal with the news will be Sir Christopher Geidt, the Queen’s private secretary, a former diplomat who was given a second knighthood in 2014, in part for planning her succession.
                  Geidt will contact the prime minister. The last time a British monarch died, 65 years ago, the demise of George VI was conveyed in a code word, “Hyde Park Corner”, to Buckingham Palace, to prevent switchboard operators from finding out. For Elizabeth II, the plan for what happens next is known as “London Bridge.” The prime minister will be woken, if she is not already awake, and civil servants will say “London Bridge is down” on secure lines. From the Foreign Office’s Global Response Centre, at an undisclosed location in the capital, the news will go out to the 15 governments outside the UK where the Queen is also the head of state, and the 36 other nations of the Commonwealth for whom she has served as a symbolic figurehead – a face familiar in dreams and the untidy drawings of a billion schoolchildren – since the dawn of the atomic age.

                  For a time, she will be gone without our knowing it. The information will travel like the compressional wave ahead of an earthquake, detectable only by special equipment. Governors general, ambassadors and prime ministers will learn first. Cupboards will be opened in search of black armbands, three-and-a-quarter inches wide, to be worn on the left arm.

                  The rest of us will find out more quickly than before. On 6 February 1952, George VI was found by his valet at Sandringham at 7.30am. The BBC did not broadcast the news until 11.15am, almost four hours later. When Princess Diana died at 4am local time at the Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital in Paris on 31 August 1997, journalists accompanying the former foreign secretary, Robin Cook, on a visit to the Philippines knew within 15 minutes. For many years the BBC was told about royal deaths first, but its monopoly on broadcasting to the empire has gone now. When the Queen dies, the announcement will go out as a newsflash to the Press Association and the rest of the world’s media simultaneously. At the same instant, a footman in mourning clothes will emerge from a door at Buckingham Palace, cross the dull pink gravel and pin a black-edged notice to the gates. While he does this, the palace website will be transformed into a sombre, single page, showing the same text on a dark background.

                  Screens will glow. There will be tweets. At the BBC, the “radio alert transmission system” (Rats), will be activated – a cold war-era alarm designed to withstand an attack on the nation’s infrastructure. Rats, which is also sometimes referred to as “royal about to snuff it”, is a near mythical part of the intricate architecture of ritual and rehearsals for the death of major royal personalities that the BBC has maintained since the 1930s. Most staff have only ever seen it work in tests; many have never seen it work at all. “Whenever there is a strange noise in the newsroom, someone always asks, ‘Is that the Rats?’ Because we don’t know what it sounds like,” one regional reporter told me.



                  All news organisations will scramble to get films on air and obituaries online. At the Guardian, the deputy editor has a list of prepared stories pinned to his wall. The Times is said to have 11 days of coverage ready to go. At Sky News and ITN, which for years rehearsed the death of the Queen substituting the name “Mrs Robinson”, calls will go out to royal experts who have already signed contracts to speak exclusively on those channels. “I am going to be sitting outside the doors of the Abbey on a hugely enlarged trestle table commentating to 300 million Americans about this,” one told me.

                  For people stuck in traffic, or with Heart FM on in the background, there will only be the subtlest of indications, at first, that something is going on.Britain’s commercial radio stations have a network of blue “obit lights”, which is tested once a week and supposed to light up in the event of a national catastrophe. When the news breaks, these lights will start flashing, to alert DJs to switch to the news in the next few minutes and to play inoffensive music in the meantime. Every station, down to hospital radio, has prepared music lists made up of “Mood 2” (sad) or “Mood 1” (saddest) songs to reach for in times of sudden mourning. “If you ever hear Haunted Dancehall (Nursery Remix) by Sabres of Paradise on daytime Radio 1, turn the TV on,” wrote Chris Price, a BBC radio producer, for the Huffington Post in 2011. “Something terrible has just happened.”

                  Having plans in place for the death of leading royals is a practice that makes some journalists uncomfortable. “There is one story which is deemed to be so much more important than others,” one former Today programme producer complained to me. For 30 years, BBC news teams were hauled to work on quiet Sunday mornings to perform mock storylines about the Queen Mother choking on a fishbone. There was once a scenario about Princess Diana dying in a car crash on the M4.

                  These well-laid plans have not always helped. In 2002, when the Queen Mother died, the obit lights didn’t come on because someone failed to push the button down properly. On the BBC, Peter Sissons, the veteran anchor, was criticised for wearing a maroon tie. Sissons was the victim of a BBC policy change, issued after the September 11 attacks, to moderate its coverage and reduce the number of “category one” royals eligible for the full obituary procedure. The last words in Sissons’s ear before going on air were: “Don’t go overboard. She’s a very old woman who had to go some time.”

                  But there will be no extemporising with the Queen. The newsreaders will wear black suits and black ties. Category one was made for her. Programmes will stop. Networks will merge. BBC 1, 2 and 4 will be interrupted and revert silently to their respective idents – an exercise class in a village hall, a swan waiting on a pond – before coming together for the news. Listeners to Radio 4 and Radio 5 live will hear a specific formulation of words, “This is the BBC from London,” which, intentionally or not, will summon a spirit of national emergency.

                  The main reason for rehearsals is to have words that are roughly approximate to the moment. “It is with the greatest sorrow that we make the following announcement,” said John Snagge, the BBC presenter who informed the world of the death of George VI. (The news was repeated seven times, every 15 minutes, and then the BBC went silent for five hours). According to one former head of BBC news, a very similar set of words will be used for the Queen. The rehearsals for her are different to the other members of the family, he explained. People become upset, and contemplate the unthinkable oddness of her absence. “She is the only monarch that most of us have ever known,” he said. The royal standard will appear on the screen. The national anthem will play. You will remember where you were.


                  "It ain't necessarily so
                  The things that you're liable
                  To read in the Bible
                  It ain't necessarily so
                  ."

                  Sportin' Life
                  Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Reading this, I did think it a tad premature: For those who may not know, Huw Edwards is a BBC "news anchor". My emphasis.

                    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-queens-health

                    The BBC has suspended programming on its main channel to move to blanket news coverage as concerns grow about the Queen’s medical condition.

                    BBC One, the most popular channel in the UK, interrupted Bargain Hunt just after 12.30pm to deliver a statement from Buckingham Palace which said that doctors are “concerned” for her health.

                    The 96-year-old, who broke with tradition to remain at her summer home of Balmoral to greet the new prime minister, Liz Truss, earlier this week, has been suffering from “episodic mobility problems” since last year.

                    BBC One has switched to a BBC News Special until at least 6pm, when the corporation’s evening news programme airs, which is being led by presenter Huw Edwards.

                    Edwards is dressed in a dark suit, white shirt and black tie – in line with the corporation’s on-air dress code when a royal family member dies as a mark of respect.


                    The poor old lady is not officially dead yet!
                    "It ain't necessarily so
                    The things that you're liable
                    To read in the Bible
                    It ain't necessarily so
                    ."

                    Sportin' Life
                    Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
                      It will probably give Truss a boost in the polls, at least temporarily. I'll wager Boris will be fuming that he has missed out on being centre stage!
                      Small mercies - his narcissistic unhappiness with missing out will at least give me some comfort.

                      However, does that mean we will not be getting the fifth series of the Royal soap The Crown on Netflix?

                      We were both looking forward to that in order to while away a winter evening.
                      I've never seen it, so it depends where it is up to... will it end on a cliff-hanger, do you think?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
                        For those who are interested - and this is what The Guardian terms the long read - this is [at least some] of what Britain can look forward to. It was published in 2017 so the reference to the PM as "she" referred to Theresa May not the present incumbent, Liz Truss

                        https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-london-bridge

                        In the plans that exist for the death of the Queen – and there are many versions, held by Buckingham Palace, the government and the BBC – most envisage that she will die after a short illness. Her family and doctors will be there. When the Queen Mother passed away on the afternoon of Easter Saturday, in 2002, at the Royal Lodge in Windsor, she had time to telephone friends to say goodbye, and to give away some of her horses. In these last hours, the Queen’s senior doctor, a gastroenterologist named Professor Huw Thomas, will be in charge. He will look after his patient, control access to her room and consider what information should be made public. The bond between sovereign and subjects is a strange and mostly unknowable thing. A nation’s life becomes a person’s, and then the string must break.

                        There will be bulletins from the palace – not many, but enough. “The Queen is suffering from great physical prostration, accompanied by symptoms which cause much anxiety,” announced Sir James Reid, Queen Victoria’s physician, two days before her death in 1901. “The King’s life is moving peacefully towards its close,” was the final notice issued by George V’s doctor,Lord Dawson, at 9.30pm on the night of 20 January 1936. Not long afterwards, Dawson injected the king with 750mg of morphine and a gram of cocaine – enough to kill him twice over – in order to ease the monarch’s suffering, and to have him expire in time for the printing presses of the Times, which rolled at midnight.

                        Her eyes will be closed and Charles will be king. His siblings will kiss his hands. The first official to deal with the news will be Sir Christopher Geidt, the Queen’s private secretary, a former diplomat who was given a second knighthood in 2014, in part for planning her succession.
                        Geidt will contact the prime minister. The last time a British monarch died, 65 years ago, the demise of George VI was conveyed in a code word, “Hyde Park Corner”, to Buckingham Palace, to prevent switchboard operators from finding out. For Elizabeth II, the plan for what happens next is known as “London Bridge.” The prime minister will be woken, if she is not already awake, and civil servants will say “London Bridge is down” on secure lines. From the Foreign Office’s Global Response Centre, at an undisclosed location in the capital, the news will go out to the 15 governments outside the UK where the Queen is also the head of state, and the 36 other nations of the Commonwealth for whom she has served as a symbolic figurehead – a face familiar in dreams and the untidy drawings of a billion schoolchildren – since the dawn of the atomic age.

                        For a time, she will be gone without our knowing it. The information will travel like the compressional wave ahead of an earthquake, detectable only by special equipment. Governors general, ambassadors and prime ministers will learn first. Cupboards will be opened in search of black armbands, three-and-a-quarter inches wide, to be worn on the left arm.

                        The rest of us will find out more quickly than before. On 6 February 1952, George VI was found by his valet at Sandringham at 7.30am. The BBC did not broadcast the news until 11.15am, almost four hours later. When Princess Diana died at 4am local time at the Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital in Paris on 31 August 1997, journalists accompanying the former foreign secretary, Robin Cook, on a visit to the Philippines knew within 15 minutes. For many years the BBC was told about royal deaths first, but its monopoly on broadcasting to the empire has gone now. When the Queen dies, the announcement will go out as a newsflash to the Press Association and the rest of the world’s media simultaneously. At the same instant, a footman in mourning clothes will emerge from a door at Buckingham Palace, cross the dull pink gravel and pin a black-edged notice to the gates. While he does this, the palace website will be transformed into a sombre, single page, showing the same text on a dark background.

                        Screens will glow. There will be tweets. At the BBC, the “radio alert transmission system” (Rats), will be activated – a cold war-era alarm designed to withstand an attack on the nation’s infrastructure. Rats, which is also sometimes referred to as “royal about to snuff it”, is a near mythical part of the intricate architecture of ritual and rehearsals for the death of major royal personalities that the BBC has maintained since the 1930s. Most staff have only ever seen it work in tests; many have never seen it work at all. “Whenever there is a strange noise in the newsroom, someone always asks, ‘Is that the Rats?’ Because we don’t know what it sounds like,” one regional reporter told me.



                        All news organisations will scramble to get films on air and obituaries online. At the Guardian, the deputy editor has a list of prepared stories pinned to his wall. The Times is said to have 11 days of coverage ready to go. At Sky News and ITN, which for years rehearsed the death of the Queen substituting the name “Mrs Robinson”, calls will go out to royal experts who have already signed contracts to speak exclusively on those channels. “I am going to be sitting outside the doors of the Abbey on a hugely enlarged trestle table commentating to 300 million Americans about this,” one told me.

                        For people stuck in traffic, or with Heart FM on in the background, there will only be the subtlest of indications, at first, that something is going on.Britain’s commercial radio stations have a network of blue “obit lights”, which is tested once a week and supposed to light up in the event of a national catastrophe. When the news breaks, these lights will start flashing, to alert DJs to switch to the news in the next few minutes and to play inoffensive music in the meantime. Every station, down to hospital radio, has prepared music lists made up of “Mood 2” (sad) or “Mood 1” (saddest) songs to reach for in times of sudden mourning. “If you ever hear Haunted Dancehall (Nursery Remix) by Sabres of Paradise on daytime Radio 1, turn the TV on,” wrote Chris Price, a BBC radio producer, for the Huffington Post in 2011. “Something terrible has just happened.”

                        Having plans in place for the death of leading royals is a practice that makes some journalists uncomfortable. “There is one story which is deemed to be so much more important than others,” one former Today programme producer complained to me. For 30 years, BBC news teams were hauled to work on quiet Sunday mornings to perform mock storylines about the Queen Mother choking on a fishbone. There was once a scenario about Princess Diana dying in a car crash on the M4.

                        These well-laid plans have not always helped. In 2002, when the Queen Mother died, the obit lights didn’t come on because someone failed to push the button down properly. On the BBC, Peter Sissons, the veteran anchor, was criticised for wearing a maroon tie. Sissons was the victim of a BBC policy change, issued after the September 11 attacks, to moderate its coverage and reduce the number of “category one” royals eligible for the full obituary procedure. The last words in Sissons’s ear before going on air were: “Don’t go overboard. She’s a very old woman who had to go some time.”

                        But there will be no extemporising with the Queen. The newsreaders will wear black suits and black ties. Category one was made for her. Programmes will stop. Networks will merge. BBC 1, 2 and 4 will be interrupted and revert silently to their respective idents – an exercise class in a village hall, a swan waiting on a pond – before coming together for the news. Listeners to Radio 4 and Radio 5 live will hear a specific formulation of words, “This is the BBC from London,” which, intentionally or not, will summon a spirit of national emergency.

                        The main reason for rehearsals is to have words that are roughly approximate to the moment. “It is with the greatest sorrow that we make the following announcement,” said John Snagge, the BBC presenter who informed the world of the death of George VI. (The news was repeated seven times, every 15 minutes, and then the BBC went silent for five hours). According to one former head of BBC news, a very similar set of words will be used for the Queen. The rehearsals for her are different to the other members of the family, he explained. People become upset, and contemplate the unthinkable oddness of her absence. “She is the only monarch that most of us have ever known,” he said. The royal standard will appear on the screen. The national anthem will play. You will remember where you were.

                        I'm actually familiar with London Bridge, as I'm a (small) part of it. I've been having planning meetings about it since ~2016/7, if I remember correctly.

                        I may find the concept of a royal family repugnant, but it's part of my job to make sure my part of London Bridge goes to plan- for those who care about such things.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                          I wish the Queen a speedy recovery.

                          Live coverage from the BBC.
                          At her age, and having lost her husband of 73+ years with all the attendant personal trauma and grief at his death, that might be a forlorn hope. Given that she was also [apparently] a very active woman, this mobility issue that she has been suffering might be driving her quietly mad and she may just feel like giving up, as very old people often do.
                          "It ain't necessarily so
                          The things that you're liable
                          To read in the Bible
                          It ain't necessarily so
                          ."

                          Sportin' Life
                          Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
                            Reading this, I did think it a tad premature: For those who may not know, Huw Edwards is a BBC "news anchor". My emphasis.

                            https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-queens-health

                            The BBC has suspended programming on its main channel to move to blanket news coverage as concerns grow about the Queen’s medical condition.

                            BBC One, the most popular channel in the UK, interrupted Bargain Hunt just after 12.30pm to deliver a statement from Buckingham Palace which said that doctors are “concerned” for her health.

                            The 96-year-old, who broke with tradition to remain at her summer home of Balmoral to greet the new prime minister, Liz Truss, earlier this week, has been suffering from “episodic mobility problems” since last year.

                            BBC One has switched to a BBC News Special until at least 6pm, when the corporation’s evening news programme airs, which is being led by presenter Huw Edwards.

                            Edwards is dressed in a dark suit, white shirt and black tie – in line with the corporation’s on-air dress code when a royal family member dies as a mark of respect.


                            The poor old lady is not officially dead yet!
                            She could have died an hour or two ago, or it may be merely a health scare. When she dies isn't necessarily the exact time it's officially announced - though the media will be notified beforehand.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EvoUK View Post

                              She could have died an hour or two ago, or it may be merely a health scare. When she dies isn't necessarily the exact time it's officially announced - though the media will be notified beforehand.
                              From reading that article in The Guardian I realise that but does the BBC know something no one else does? I suspect not. It seems more like preparation for the inevitable.
                              "It ain't necessarily so
                              The things that you're liable
                              To read in the Bible
                              It ain't necessarily so
                              ."

                              Sportin' Life
                              Porgy & Bess, DuBose Heyward, George & Ira Gershwin

                              Comment

                              Related Threads

                              Collapse

                              Topics Statistics Last Post
                              Started by seer, Today, 01:40 PM
                              5 responses
                              38 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post Mountain Man  
                              Started by Gondwanaland, 11-26-2022, 03:06 PM
                              9 responses
                              87 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post CivilDiscourse  
                              Started by shunyadragon, 11-26-2022, 01:46 PM
                              160 responses
                              871 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post Diogenes  
                              Started by Gondwanaland, 11-25-2022, 02:56 PM
                              22 responses
                              181 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post Cow Poke  
                              Started by Diogenes, 11-23-2022, 12:22 PM
                              71 responses
                              433 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post Cow Poke  
                              Working...
                              X