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Salman Rushdie Attacked

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  • Salman Rushdie Attacked

    The author Salman Rushdie was attacked about 3 hours ago at a speaking event and apparently stabbed in the neck. His exact condition is unknown and the attacker is in custody. Of course, it's way too early and too little information to speculate on motive.

    As a believer in freedom of speech, this is just another milestone in our inability to get along with those with disagree with.

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/12/us/sa...ked/index.html
    "For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." Hosea 6:6

    "Theology can be an intellectual entertainment." Metropolitan Anthony Bloom

  • #2
    Originally posted by Thoughtful Monk View Post
    The author Salman Rushdie was attacked about 3 hours ago at a speaking event and apparently stabbed in the neck. His exact condition is unknown and the attacker is in custody. Of course, it's way too early and too little information to speculate on motive.

    As a believer in freedom of speech, this is just another milestone in our inability to get along with those with disagree with.

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/12/us/sa...ked/index.html
    No need to speculate when you have a death fatwa hanging over your head.
    "You should just assume going forward that if I am ever wrong it is a typo" - Backup
    "
    Reality simply does not change based upon consensus or desire." - rogue

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ronson View Post

      No need to speculate when you have a death fatwa hanging over your head.
      I agree that's the most likely reason plus the over 3-million-dollar bounty on his head. Still, I prefer not to overly speculate until the facts come in. Helps prevent apologies and retractions.
      "For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." Hosea 6:6

      "Theology can be an intellectual entertainment." Metropolitan Anthony Bloom

      Comment


      • #4
        They finally got to him! And I'm happy to speculate...
        Atheism is the cult of death, the death of hope. The universe is doomed, you are doomed, the only thing that remains is to await your execution...

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbnueb2OI4o&t=3s

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Thoughtful Monk View Post

          I agree that's the most likely reason plus the over 3-million-dollar bounty on his head. Still, I prefer not to overly speculate until the facts come in. Helps prevent apologies and retractions.
          Well .... I supposed there's a slim possibility that a spurned lover went after him, or some loon just escaped from a padded cell. But I'll put my money on the fatwa.
          "You should just assume going forward that if I am ever wrong it is a typo" - Backup
          "
          Reality simply does not change based upon consensus or desire." - rogue

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ronson View Post

            Well .... I supposed there's a slim possibility that a spurned lover went after him, or some loon just escaped from a padded cell. But I'll put my money on the fatwa.
            I will not bet against you.
            "For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." Hosea 6:6

            "Theology can be an intellectual entertainment." Metropolitan Anthony Bloom

            Comment


            • #7
              I know the name, but I'm not actually familiar with his writings.
              Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
              But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
              Than a fool in the eyes of God


              From "Fools Gold" by Petra

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                I know the name, but I'm not actually familiar with his writings.
                You must have been on vacation there for a while in the 1980s. Rushdie wrote the book "Satanic Verses", which mentions Mohammed by name and (IIRC) includes him in some fictional story. Ayatolloh Khomeini put a fatwa (hit warrant) out on him and he's been living in-and-out of hiding ever since.

                Imagine still having to play hide-and-seek some 33 years after Khomeini died.
                "You should just assume going forward that if I am ever wrong it is a typo" - Backup
                "
                Reality simply does not change based upon consensus or desire." - rogue

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ronson View Post

                  You must have been on vacation there for a while in the 1980s. Rushdie wrote the book "Satanic Verses", which mentions Mohammed by name and (IIRC) includes him in some fictional story. Ayatolloh Khomeini put a fatwa (hit warrant) out on him and he's been living in-and-out of hiding ever since.

                  Imagine still having to play hide-and-seek some 33 years after Khomeini died.
                  Oh, right, that's why the name sounded to familiar. In the 1980s, I was still making my way through junior high and high school and didn't pay much attention to that sort of thing.
                  Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
                  But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
                  Than a fool in the eyes of God


                  From "Fools Gold" by Petra

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ronson View Post
                    You must have been on vacation there for a while in the 1980s. Rushdie wrote the book "Satanic Verses", which mentions Mohammed by name and (IIRC) includes him in some fictional story. Ayatolloh Khomeini put a fatwa (hit warrant) out on him and he's been living in-and-out of hiding ever since.

                    Imagine still having to play hide-and-seek some 33 years after Khomeini died.
                    Rushdie’s “Satanic Verses” doesn’t actually include or promote the namesaked “Satanic verses” possibly struck from the Qur’an. In the contested tradition, Muhammad originally allowed for intercession with Allah from three pagan goddesses before recognizing the voice he’d heard was not Gabriel’s but the shaytan. Upon realizing this, he supposedly stripped the mistakenly inserted Satanic verses from the Qur’an.

                    Rushdie writes beautifully, and allegorically, and the titular reference seems to me to speak to the novel’s subtext of performing evil while attempting to do good. He received a death fatwa based solely on the title. Of course, as all of his novels have been made haraam, I’ve long since learned you can’t even argue this on an Islamic website.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To everyone's surprise

                      Source: NJ man, Hadi Matar, with sympathies toward Iranian government ID’d as suspect in Salman Rushdie stabbing


                      The man arrested in Friday’s stabbing of famed novelist Salman Rushdie was identified by police as a New Jersey man, who law enforcement sources tell The Post he had sympathies toward the Iranian government that has called for Rushdie’s death.

                      Hadi Matar, 24, of Fairview, New Jersey, was arrested after he stormed the stage at the Chautauqua Institution in Western New York and allegedly stabbed the author multiple times, New York State Police said Friday.

                      Rushdie suffered stab wounds to the neck and abdomen, and remained in surgery at a nearby trauma center Friday evening, according to police.

                      Law enforcement sources told The Post that an initial investigation suggests Matar has made social media posts in support of Iran and its Revolutionary Guard, and in support of Shi’a extremism more broadly.

                      New York State Police, however, said that Matar’s motive remained unclear.

                      “We don’t have any indication of a motive at this time,” Major Eugene J. Staniszewski told reporters. He added that police believe Matar acted alone.

                      Regardless, the attack comes amid a slew of foiled Iranian plots on American soil, including a plot against former National Security Advisor John Bolton and an apparent attempt on the life of an Iranian-American journalist in Brooklyn.

                      Rushdie, 75, has been the subject of death threats from the Iranian regime since the late 1980s.

                      His 1988 novel “The Satanic Verses” was considered blasphemous by some Muslims, and led to Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini issuing a fatwa, or edict, calling for Rushdie’s death in 1989.

                      In 1991, two translators involved in the book’s publication abroad were stabbed — one fatally.

                      By the late 90’s, the Iranian government said the fatwa would not be carried out.

                      But as recently as 2012 a semi-official religious organization inside Iran placed an over $3 million bounty on the author’s head, and in 2019 Khomeni’s successor was temporarily banned from twitter for calling for Rushdie’s death.

                      The author was stabbed ahead of a planned talk about “the United States as [an] asylum for writers and other artists in exile and as a home for freedom of creative expression,” according to the institution’s website.

                      Charges against Matar have not yet been announced.



                      Source

                      © Copyright Original Source




                      I'm always still in trouble again

                      "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                      "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                      "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pretty good over view / timeline

                        Source: February 14, 1989: The fatwa against Salman Rushdie


                        Friday's knife attack on Salman Rushdie comes more than 33 years after the fatwa against him by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in which he sentenced him to death.

                        The Fatwa

                        On February 14, 1989 Khomeini called for him to be killed for writing "The Satanic Verses", which the cleric said insulted Islam.

                        In a fatwa, or religious decree, Khomeini urged "Muslims of the world rapidly to execute the author and the publishers of the book" so that "no one will any longer dare to offend the sacred values of Islam."

                        Khomeini, who was 89 and had just four months to live, added that anyone who was killed trying to carry out the death sentence should be considered a "martyr" who would go to paradise.

                        A $2.8-million bounty was put on the writer's head.

                        The British government immediately granted police protection to Rushdie, an atheist born in India to non-practising Muslims.

                        For almost 13 years he moved between safe houses under the pseudonym of Joseph Anton, changing base 56 times in the first six months. His solitude was worsened by the split with his wife American novelist Marianne Wiggins, to whom "The Satanic Verses" are dedicated.

                        "I am gagged and imprisoned," he recalled writing in his diary in his 2012 memoir, "Joseph Anton".

                        "I can't even speak. I want to kick a football in a park with my son. Ordinary, banal life: my impossible dream."

                        'Blasphemous'

                        Viking Penguin published "The Satanic Verses" in September 1988 to critical acclaim.

                        The book is set by turns in the London of Conservative British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and ancient Mecca, Islam's holiest site.

                        It centres on the adventures of two Indian actors, Gibreel and Saladin, whose hijacked plane explodes over the English Channel.

                        They re-emerge on an English beach and mix with immigrants in London, the story unfolding in surreal sequences reflecting Rushdie's magic realism style.

                        The book was deemed blasphemous and sacrilegious by many Muslims including over references to verses alleged by some scholars to have been an early version of the Koran and later removed.

                        These verses allow for prayers to be made to three pagan goddesses, contrary to Islam's strict belief that there is only one God.

                        Controversially, Rushdie writes of the involvement of a prophet resembling the founder of Islam, Mohammed.

                        This prophet is tricked into striking a deal with Satan in which he exchanges some of his monotheistic dogmatism in favour of the three goddesses. He then realises his error.

                        Khomeini and others insist he had depicted the prophet irreverently.

                        'Hang Rushdie'

                        In October 1988, Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi banned the import of the book, hoping to win Muslim support ahead of elections. Some 20 countries went on to outlaw it.

                        In January 1989, Muslims in Britain's northern city of Bradford burned copies in public.

                        A month later, thousands of Pakistanis attacked the US Information Center in Islamabad, shouting "American dogs" and "hang Salman Rushdie". Police opened fire, killing five.

                        Khomeini's fatwa provoked horror around the Western world.

                        There were protests in Europe, and London and Tehran broke off diplomatic relations for nearly two years.

                        In the United States, authors like Susan Sontag and Tom Wolfe organised public lectures to support Rushdie.

                        The author tried to explain himself in 1990 in an essay titled "In Good Faith" but many Muslims were not placated.

                        Attacks

                        Rushdie gradually emerged from his underground life in 1991, but his Japanese translator was killed in July that year.

                        His Italian translator was stabbed a few days later and a Norwegian publisher shot two years later, although it was never clear the attacks were in response to Khomeini's call.

                        In 1993, Islamist protesters torched a hotel in Sivas in central Turkey, some of whom were angered by the presence of writer Aziz Nesin, who sought to translate the novel into Turkish. He escaped but 37 people were killed.

                        In 1998, the government of Iran's reformist president Mohammad Khatami assured Britain that Iran would not implement the fatwa.

                        But Khomeini's successor, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said in 2005 he still believed Rushdie was an apostate whose killing would be authorised by Islam.

                        'Islamophobia'

                        Many Muslims were furious when Rushdie was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2007 for his services to literature.

                        Iran accused Britain of "Islamophobia", saying its fatwa still stood, and there were widespread Muslim protests, notably in Pakistan.

                        Rushdie was by then living relatively openly in New York where he moved in the late 1990s, and where his recent novels are set.

                        After many years living in the shadows, he became something of a socialite and is seen by many in the West as a free speech hero.

                        Until Friday's knife attack, he had very much resumed a normal life.



                        Source

                        © Copyright Original Source



                        I'm always still in trouble again

                        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                        "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                          Pretty good over view / timeline

                          Source: February 14, 1989: The fatwa against Salman Rushdie


                          Friday's knife attack on Salman Rushdie comes more than 33 years after the fatwa against him by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in which he sentenced him to death.

                          The Fatwa

                          On February 14, 1989 Khomeini called for him to be killed for writing "The Satanic Verses", which the cleric said insulted Islam.

                          In a fatwa, or religious decree, Khomeini urged "Muslims of the world rapidly to execute the author and the publishers of the book" so that "no one will any longer dare to offend the sacred values of Islam."

                          Khomeini, who was 89 and had just four months to live, added that anyone who was killed trying to carry out the death sentence should be considered a "martyr" who would go to paradise.

                          A $2.8-million bounty was put on the writer's head.

                          The British government immediately granted police protection to Rushdie, an atheist born in India to non-practising Muslims.

                          For almost 13 years he moved between safe houses under the pseudonym of Joseph Anton, changing base 56 times in the first six months. His solitude was worsened by the split with his wife American novelist Marianne Wiggins, to whom "The Satanic Verses" are dedicated.

                          "I am gagged and imprisoned," he recalled writing in his diary in his 2012 memoir, "Joseph Anton".

                          "I can't even speak. I want to kick a football in a park with my son. Ordinary, banal life: my impossible dream."

                          'Blasphemous'

                          Viking Penguin published "The Satanic Verses" in September 1988 to critical acclaim.

                          The book is set by turns in the London of Conservative British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and ancient Mecca, Islam's holiest site.

                          It centres on the adventures of two Indian actors, Gibreel and Saladin, whose hijacked plane explodes over the English Channel.

                          They re-emerge on an English beach and mix with immigrants in London, the story unfolding in surreal sequences reflecting Rushdie's magic realism style.

                          The book was deemed blasphemous and sacrilegious by many Muslims including over references to verses alleged by some scholars to have been an early version of the Koran and later removed.

                          These verses allow for prayers to be made to three pagan goddesses, contrary to Islam's strict belief that there is only one God.

                          Controversially, Rushdie writes of the involvement of a prophet resembling the founder of Islam, Mohammed.

                          This prophet is tricked into striking a deal with Satan in which he exchanges some of his monotheistic dogmatism in favour of the three goddesses. He then realises his error.

                          Khomeini and others insist he had depicted the prophet irreverently.

                          'Hang Rushdie'

                          In October 1988, Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi banned the import of the book, hoping to win Muslim support ahead of elections. Some 20 countries went on to outlaw it.

                          In January 1989, Muslims in Britain's northern city of Bradford burned copies in public.

                          A month later, thousands of Pakistanis attacked the US Information Center in Islamabad, shouting "American dogs" and "hang Salman Rushdie". Police opened fire, killing five.

                          Khomeini's fatwa provoked horror around the Western world.

                          There were protests in Europe, and London and Tehran broke off diplomatic relations for nearly two years.

                          In the United States, authors like Susan Sontag and Tom Wolfe organised public lectures to support Rushdie.

                          The author tried to explain himself in 1990 in an essay titled "In Good Faith" but many Muslims were not placated.

                          Attacks

                          Rushdie gradually emerged from his underground life in 1991, but his Japanese translator was killed in July that year.

                          His Italian translator was stabbed a few days later and a Norwegian publisher shot two years later, although it was never clear the attacks were in response to Khomeini's call.

                          In 1993, Islamist protesters torched a hotel in Sivas in central Turkey, some of whom were angered by the presence of writer Aziz Nesin, who sought to translate the novel into Turkish. He escaped but 37 people were killed.

                          In 1998, the government of Iran's reformist president Mohammad Khatami assured Britain that Iran would not implement the fatwa.

                          But Khomeini's successor, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said in 2005 he still believed Rushdie was an apostate whose killing would be authorised by Islam.

                          'Islamophobia'

                          Many Muslims were furious when Rushdie was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2007 for his services to literature.

                          Iran accused Britain of "Islamophobia", saying its fatwa still stood, and there were widespread Muslim protests, notably in Pakistan.

                          Rushdie was by then living relatively openly in New York where he moved in the late 1990s, and where his recent novels are set.

                          After many years living in the shadows, he became something of a socialite and is seen by many in the West as a free speech hero.

                          Until Friday's knife attack, he had very much resumed a normal life.

                          Source

                          © Copyright Original Source

                          One addition that I recall. Yusef Islam (more commonly known as Cat Stevens) made inconsistent statements about the fatwa - some of which could only be interpreted as an endorsement. He was skewered in the media for that. He backtracked later and said he was only joking "in bad taste" but still defended the fatwa as legitimate when dealing with Islam blasphemers. Later again, he said he would accept a British ruling if it decreed Rushdie as innocent ("innocent" of what was never answered).
                          "You should just assume going forward that if I am ever wrong it is a typo" - Backup
                          "
                          Reality simply does not change based upon consensus or desire." - rogue

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Per Fox News just now, Rushdie "improving," taken off ventilator, able to speak.
                            Geislerminian Antinomian Kenotic Charispneumaticostal Gender Mutualist-Egalitarian.

                            Beige Federalist.

                            Nationalist Christian.

                            "Everybody is somebody's heretic."

                            Social Justice is usually the opposite of actual justice.

                            Proud member of the LGBFJB community.

                            Would-be Grand Vizier of the Padishah Maxi-Super-Ultra-Hyper-Mega-MAGA King Trumpius Rex.

                            Justice for Ashli Babbitt!

                            Justice for Matthew Perna!

                            Arrest Ray Epps and his Fed bosses!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NorrinRadd View Post
                              Per Fox News just now, Rushdie "improving," taken off ventilator, able to speak.
                              I've heard he might lose an eye after being stabbed over a dozen times.

                              They are celebrating in Tehran where an MP, Malek Shariati Niasar, has claimed that the brutal stabbing of Salman Rushdie was the "direct work" of the country in response to the U.S. killing Qasem Soleimani.

                              Surprising everyone who assumed that being this was New York that the D.A. would let the attacker out on a no-cash bail, Hadi Matar is actually being held without bond.

                              I'm always still in trouble again

                              "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                              "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                              "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                              Comment

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