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Latest in virtue signaling -- New Zealand to change its name?

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  • Latest in virtue signaling -- New Zealand to change its name?

    Source: Welcome to Aotearoa? The Campaign to Decolonize New Zealand’s Name


    Parliamentary committee could recommend vote among lawmakers or referendum to adopt Māori name

    The first European contact with indigenous Māori ended with four sailors killed and a hasty retreat. But it led to an identity for this South Pacific country: Nieuw Zeeland in Dutch, or New Zealand when it later became part of the British Empire.

    Now, some lawmakers want New Zealanders to drop a name that harks back to an era of colonization and adopt another—Aotearoa, a Māori word referring to the clouds that indigenous oral history says helped early Polynesian navigators make their way here.

    Around the world, several countries are rethinking their identities to address resentment at their colonial past and forge a new future. In some cases, that involves changing the head of state, such as Barbados’s severing of ties to the British monarchy. In others, it has meant changing its official name, as Eswatini did in 2018 when its absolute ruler decided it should no longer be known as Swaziland. Australia in recent years tweaked its national anthem because it didn’t reflect its Aboriginal history.

    In New Zealand, the issue is coming to a head because a petition to rename the country Aotearoa—pronounced ‘au-te-a-ro-uh’—garnered more than 70,000 signatures and will be considered by a parliamentary committee that could recommend a vote in Parliament, put it to a referendum or take no further action.

    “It’s a realignment to where we are as a nation,” said Rawiri Waititi, co-leader of the Māori Party, a small party in Parliament that supported the petition. “It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

    Over several decades, Aotearoa has become more common in everyday speech. It appears on bank notes and passports, and is often in government documents, either alone or combined with New Zealand. When the U.S. and New Zealand issued a joint statement following a meeting of their leaders in May, it referred to Jacinda Ardern as prime minister of Aotearoa New Zealand. Māori is one of three official languages in New Zealand but fluency has plummeted, a legacy of colonial-era policies that restricted its use.

    Ms. Ardern welcomes the wider use of Aotearoa, but a formal name change isn’t being explored by the government, a spokeswoman for the prime minister said. Among those who favor a referendum is Christopher Luxon, leader of the opposition National Party, who believes it is an issue that shouldn’t be decided by the government.

    Opinion polls suggest advocates of a new identity face an uphill battle. More than half of respondents want to keep New Zealand, according to one survey by market-research company Colmar Brunton. Still, Aotearoa alone or Aotearoa New Zealand command about a combined 40% support.

    Law student Ralph Zambrano is among those who support the wider use of Aotearoa. “Utilizing Aotearoa as our name really reflects our history and acknowledges our past, but also how we can move forward together,” said Mr. Zambrano, president of the students’ association at Victoria University of Wellington.

    While Dutch explorers were the first Europeans to sight New Zealand in 1642, it was another 127 years before the next recorded encounter between Europeans and Māori took place. It was the British, in 1840, who claimed New Zealand and brokered a treaty with dozens of Māori chiefs. That document, the Treaty of Waitangi, is now the legal basis for righting grievances that stemmed from conflict with European settlers, dispossession of Māori land and capital, and alienation of culture and language.

    Proponents of change argue that the country’s official name has only a glancing link to its history and less connection to how it has evolved since the mid-1970s, when a law change established a framework for compensating Māori iwi—tribal groups—and helped usher in a Māori cultural renaissance.

    Some opponents believe Aotearoa is a modern invention, popularized by a late 19th-century history book. However, it appears in New Zealand newspapers from the mid-19th century, pointing to its earlier origins.

    “I think it’s divisive,” said Whanganui city councilor Charlie Anderson, a retired air-ambulance pilot who a decade ago campaigned to keep the anglicized Wanganui as the city’s name. “We can’t keep just changing history for the sake of it.”

    Within Māori society, Aotearoa isn’t accepted across the country. When translated into Māori, New Zealand is Nu Tirene, which first appeared in the 1830s but isn’t part of modern vernacular.
    Attitudes can be slow to shift in New Zealand, a country of some five million people. New Zealanders rejected a new national flag in a referendum six years ago. Citizens have shown little appetite for removing the British monarch as head of state, even though Queen Elizabeth II resides nearly 12,000 miles away in London and last visited New Zealand two decades ago.

    As mayor of Queenstown, Jim Boult is part of a council drive to get local businesses to change Wakatipu, the alpine tourist town’s picturesque lake, to Whakatipu so that it is correct in Māori. The campaign has faced little pushback, he said.

    Still, Mr. Boult worries that changing the country’s name would damage the tourism industry because New Zealand is an established, strong brand internationally.

    “It would be akin to BMW rebranding as Bavarian Motors,” he said.



    Source

    © Copyright Original Source



    Now star can correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that Aotearoa was what the Māori living on the North Island called that island and it didn't extend to the South Island which was called something else by its Māori inhabitants.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

  • #2
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Source: Welcome to Aotearoa? The Campaign to Decolonize New Zealand’s Name


    Parliamentary committee could recommend vote among lawmakers or referendum to adopt Māori name

    The first European contact with indigenous Māori ended with four sailors killed and a hasty retreat. But it led to an identity for this South Pacific country: Nieuw Zeeland in Dutch, or New Zealand when it later became part of the British Empire.

    Now, some lawmakers want New Zealanders to drop a name that harks back to an era of colonization and adopt another—Aotearoa, a Māori word referring to the clouds that indigenous oral history says helped early Polynesian navigators make their way here.

    Around the world, several countries are rethinking their identities to address resentment at their colonial past and forge a new future. In some cases, that involves changing the head of state, such as Barbados’s severing of ties to the British monarchy. In others, it has meant changing its official name, as Eswatini did in 2018 when its absolute ruler decided it should no longer be known as Swaziland. Australia in recent years tweaked its national anthem because it didn’t reflect its Aboriginal history.

    In New Zealand, the issue is coming to a head because a petition to rename the country Aotearoa—pronounced ‘au-te-a-ro-uh’—garnered more than 70,000 signatures and will be considered by a parliamentary committee that could recommend a vote in Parliament, put it to a referendum or take no further action.

    “It’s a realignment to where we are as a nation,” said Rawiri Waititi, co-leader of the Māori Party, a small party in Parliament that supported the petition. “It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

    Over several decades, Aotearoa has become more common in everyday speech. It appears on bank notes and passports, and is often in government documents, either alone or combined with New Zealand. When the U.S. and New Zealand issued a joint statement following a meeting of their leaders in May, it referred to Jacinda Ardern as prime minister of Aotearoa New Zealand. Māori is one of three official languages in New Zealand but fluency has plummeted, a legacy of colonial-era policies that restricted its use.

    Ms. Ardern welcomes the wider use of Aotearoa, but a formal name change isn’t being explored by the government, a spokeswoman for the prime minister said. Among those who favor a referendum is Christopher Luxon, leader of the opposition National Party, who believes it is an issue that shouldn’t be decided by the government.

    Opinion polls suggest advocates of a new identity face an uphill battle. More than half of respondents want to keep New Zealand, according to one survey by market-research company Colmar Brunton. Still, Aotearoa alone or Aotearoa New Zealand command about a combined 40% support.

    Law student Ralph Zambrano is among those who support the wider use of Aotearoa. “Utilizing Aotearoa as our name really reflects our history and acknowledges our past, but also how we can move forward together,” said Mr. Zambrano, president of the students’ association at Victoria University of Wellington.

    While Dutch explorers were the first Europeans to sight New Zealand in 1642, it was another 127 years before the next recorded encounter between Europeans and Māori took place. It was the British, in 1840, who claimed New Zealand and brokered a treaty with dozens of Māori chiefs. That document, the Treaty of Waitangi, is now the legal basis for righting grievances that stemmed from conflict with European settlers, dispossession of Māori land and capital, and alienation of culture and language.

    Proponents of change argue that the country’s official name has only a glancing link to its history and less connection to how it has evolved since the mid-1970s, when a law change established a framework for compensating Māori iwi—tribal groups—and helped usher in a Māori cultural renaissance.

    Some opponents believe Aotearoa is a modern invention, popularized by a late 19th-century history book. However, it appears in New Zealand newspapers from the mid-19th century, pointing to its earlier origins.

    “I think it’s divisive,” said Whanganui city councilor Charlie Anderson, a retired air-ambulance pilot who a decade ago campaigned to keep the anglicized Wanganui as the city’s name. “We can’t keep just changing history for the sake of it.”

    Within Māori society, Aotearoa isn’t accepted across the country. When translated into Māori, New Zealand is Nu Tirene, which first appeared in the 1830s but isn’t part of modern vernacular.
    Attitudes can be slow to shift in New Zealand, a country of some five million people. New Zealanders rejected a new national flag in a referendum six years ago. Citizens have shown little appetite for removing the British monarch as head of state, even though Queen Elizabeth II resides nearly 12,000 miles away in London and last visited New Zealand two decades ago.

    As mayor of Queenstown, Jim Boult is part of a council drive to get local businesses to change Wakatipu, the alpine tourist town’s picturesque lake, to Whakatipu so that it is correct in Māori. The campaign has faced little pushback, he said.

    Still, Mr. Boult worries that changing the country’s name would damage the tourism industry because New Zealand is an established, strong brand internationally.

    “It would be akin to BMW rebranding as Bavarian Motors,” he said.



    Source

    © Copyright Original Source



    Now star can correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that Aotearoa was what the Māori living on the North Island called that island and it didn't extend to the South Island which was called something else by its Māori inhabitants.
    A white colonized country, oppressors of their native population, now want to change their name to a native name. Talk about Cultural Appropriation.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by CivilDiscourse View Post

      A white colonized country, oppressors of their native population, now want to change their name to a native name. Talk about Cultural Appropriation.
      IF I'm correct in remembering that Aotearoa was what the Māori on the North Island called that island but the Māori on the South Island (the larger of the two) had a different name for their home (Waipounamu?), this looks like the typical what difference does it make, they all look alike mentality in play.

      Of course, if Kiwis want to change their name that is up to them

      I'm always still in trouble again

      "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
      "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
      "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

      Comment


      • #4
        It'll be good for the pull down map industry though!!

        That's what
        - She

        Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals
        - Manya the Holy Szin (The Quintara Marathon)

        I may not be as old as dirt, but me and dirt are starting to have an awful lot in common
        Stephen R. Donaldson

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post
          It'll be good for the pull down map industry though!!
          I wonder how many classrooms still have old maps that still have the Soviet Union on them.

          I'm always still in trouble again

          "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
          "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
          "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
            Now star can correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that Aotearoa was what the Māori living on the North Island called that island and it didn't extend to the South Island which was called something else by its Māori inhabitants.
            If the wasn't for the Europeans they would still be using spears and eating wallabies...

            Atheism is the cult of death, the death of hope. The universe is doomed, you are doomed, the only thing that remains is to await your execution...

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbnueb2OI4o&t=3s

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by seer View Post

              If the wasn't for the Europeans they would still be using spears and eating wallabies...
              Meh. Any group kept in complete isolation will not change much technologically.

              I'm always still in trouble again

              "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
              "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
              "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by seer View Post

                If the wasn't for the Europeans they would still be using spears and eating wallabies...
                I'm pretty sure that Maoris didn't do their hunting in Australia.
                1Cor 15:34 εκνηψατε δικαιως και μη αμαρτανετε αγνωσιαν γαρ θεου τινες εχουσιν προς εντροπην υμιν λεγω
                Come to your senses as you ought and stop sinning; for I say to your shame, there are some who know not God.
                .
                "when the church no longer teaches its people why they believe what they believe, the world will often step in and fill in the gaps." Ryan Danker

                "The synoptic gospels claim that Jesus was crucified on the 15th day of Nisan and buried on the 14th day of Nisan:" Majority Consensus

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tabibito View Post

                  I'm pretty sure that Maoris didn't do their hunting in Australia.
                  Kiwis. Aussies.

                  Same thing only different

                  I'm always still in trouble again

                  "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                  "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                  "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I suggest they rename it Middle Earth and rename all of the towns and features to Lord of the Rings names. Like Hobbiton, Mordor, Mount Doom, etc.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sparko View Post
                      I suggest they rename it Middle Earth and rename all of the towns and features to Lord of the Rings names. Like Hobbiton, Mordor, Mount Doom, etc.
                      I approve this message.

                      Heck, they already have a Hobbiton. After The Hobbit films were completed, the outdoor set was turned into a tourist attraction. Which is somewhat ironic because they destroyed the original set after completing The Lord of the Rings many years earlier because they didn't want it to be turned into a tourist attraction, I think partly because the owner of the land where the set was built was planning to do it without Newline's permission, and partly because the filmmakers failed to realize what a cultural phenomenon the films would be for New Zealand.
                      Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
                      But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
                      Than a fool in the eyes of God


                      From "Fools Gold" by Petra

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's stupid to do it for THAT reason. The capitol city of Alberta, a liberal run and minded city, changed all the names of their electoral wards to aboriginal names last fall, just before their municipal elections.

                        Can't pronounce most of them.

                        https://www.edmonton.ca/city_governm...oundary-review

                        New Ward Maps (effective October 18, 2021)


                        City Wide

                        Nakota Isga - Pronunciation: NA-KOH-TAH EE-SKA

                        Anirniq - Pronunciation: A nirk nik

                        tastawiyiniwak (ᑕᐢᑕᐃᐧᔨᓂᐊᐧᐠ) - Pronunciation: TASS-TAW-WIN-EE-WOK

                        Dene - Pronunciation: DEH-NEH

                        O-day’min - Pronunciation: Oh-DAY-min

                        Métis - Pronunciation: MAY-TEA

                        sipiwiyiniwak - Pronunciation: SEE-PEE-WIN-EE-WOK

                        papastew - Pronunciation: PAH-PAH-STAY-OH

                        pihêsiwin ᐱᐦᐁᓯᐏᐣ - Pronunciation: Pee-hay-soo-win

                        Ipiihkoohkanipiaohtsi - Pronunciation: E-pee-ko-ka-nee piu-tsi-ya

                        Karhiio - Pronunciation: Gar-ee-he-o

                        Sspomitapi - Pronunciation: SS-POH-ME-TAH-PEE


                        Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mossrose View Post
                          It's stupid to do it for THAT reason. The capitol city of Alberta, a liberal run and minded city, changed all the names of their electoral wards to aboriginal names last fall, just before their municipal elections.

                          Can't pronounce most of them.
                          I guess the Catholic Church didn't go far enough...

                          Atheism is the cult of death, the death of hope. The universe is doomed, you are doomed, the only thing that remains is to await your execution...

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbnueb2OI4o&t=3s

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by seer View Post

                            I guess the Catholic Church didn't go far enough...
                            Well, the pope is here now to formally apologize for the "atrocities" done by the RCC in the residential schools.

                            It won't be enough. Nothing will ever be enough. Every government that comes into power, every generation of Canadians will have to formally apologize and pour money into the issue.

                            Trudeau said following the pope's apology, "It's a step forward".

                            That speaks volumes.
                            Last edited by mossrose; 07-27-2022, 01:35 PM.


                            Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All weird earth cities should be renamed to something in English, because English is the easiest for me to pronounce. And that especially goes for Wales!
                              "You should just assume going forward that if I am ever wrong it is a typo" - Backup
                              "
                              Reality simply does not change based upon consensus or desire." - rogue

                              Comment

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