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  • #61
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post


    And the fact that her spokesman ended up dismissing the claim as nothing more than "a sweet family story her mother shared to inspire greatness in her daughter, to great results I might add" drives a stake through any attempts to turn this pile of bovine scat into the truth (or is this more of the left's "choos[ing] truth over facts"?).
    morallyright-factuallycorrect.jpg


    Just a reminder that it isn't just old Joe who isn't worried about factual accuracy.


    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
      My wife and I were watching the colorized version of Wizard of Oz when I read this, and they were singing "the witch is dead" song.

      (I have a hard time with colorized classics -- maybe because I'm colorblind and it just makes them look funny)
      I'm not colorblind, but they look "off" to me too. Especially something like "It's a Wonderful Life".

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post
        I'm not colorblind, but they look "off" to me too. Especially something like "It's a Wonderful Life".
        My colorblindness is just the blue/green/black/brown -- all look pretty much the same. I can see the bright red/yellow -- and the Wizard of Oz "in color" parts look "phony color" to me.

        But, I guess the purpose was to show the drastic difference between "plain ol' Kansas" and THE WIZ place.

        The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
          You can look at films from the 40s and 50s and while most men wore a hat, many didn't. Not like this video from 1911 where I think I spotted two maybe three men without a hat on. Even a number of young boys wore hats!

          And this brings up another question... where are all the wimmenfolk?
          For the sarcastically impaired the following is said in jest

          At home, cooking and doing the laundry, and raising children, where they should be!

          The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by seanD View Post
            I recall Warren claiming the test she took "proved" she was right, even though everyone acknowledged it proved otherwise, and continued to badger Trump for not honoring his bet when it was "proved," according to her, she was right.
            Yeah, she definitely doubled down on it, and milked that lie for all it was worth.
            The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

              My colorblindness is just the blue/green/black/brown -- all look pretty much the same. I can see the bright red/yellow -- and the Wizard of Oz "in color" parts look "phony color" to me.

              But, I guess the purpose was to show the drastic difference between "plain ol' Kansas" and THE WIZ place.
              Early Technicolor often looks off in a similar way to "colorized" black and white movies. In the latter I'm able to see a second layer to everything. It's almost like how your brain looks at a movie with those old red and blue 3D glasses. Early Technicolor has a similar look, but not quite as pronounced.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post
                Early Technicolor often looks off in a similar way to "colorized" black and white movies. In the latter I'm able to see a second layer to everything. It's almost like how your brain looks at a movie with those old red and blue 3D glasses. Early Technicolor has a similar look, but not quite as pronounced.
                Interesting - makes sense.
                The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                  The problem with Hillary and Warren was that they continue telling their tales even after they get debunked. That is where the problem lies.

                  And with Hillary, who was proclaimed "the smartest woman in America" when Bill was POTUS, you would think at some point basic math would have come into play.

                  And with Warren, aside from lying about never using her "minority status" to advance herself, she also plagiarized some recipes and passed them off as old family recipes reflecting her supposed Native American heritage.

                  Those are what changes family stories into deliberate lies.
                  If true, they certainly push the edge of what can be excused. But perhaps best to focus on the persistent use of the story than be so critical of the fact such a story was ever told? The is no acknowledgement in this thread, or the warren threads for that matter, of the fact the stories likely have innocent origin but only become an issue when they are repeatedly told after having been corrected.

                  With Warren, it was fairly clear she absolutely believed the stories about her heritage until the DNA tests explicitly showed they were likely exaggerated over time (she does have Indian ancestry). I don't fault her on that account. DNA tests did not exist when she went to college, and I don't have any idea what evidence was required to prove what she had been told was true, but I do know that tribes have become increasingly skeptical of claims to indian heritage, requiring birth records and a minimum percentage inheritance (usually 1/16 - a full blooded great grandparent), specifically because of instance like Warren's where people were told they had Indian ancestry by parents and relatives and they believed and acted on it.

                  With Hil(l)ary, it's such a trivial thing I find it hard to get worked up over it, but as for concern over her persisting in telling the story - that would depend a bit on whether her mom told her that regardless of what people were saying, she named her after the mountaineer. Like has been said, it is possible her mom was aware of him before 1953. So if your mom says she did, and it was possible, would you toss it in her face and say she was lying?

                  This is the sort of thing I don't find indicative of poor character. Family stories are family stories. They tend to get changed over time, usually exaggerated in some positive way. We usually don't look too closely at them. Public figures - as we can see here - do need to be a bit careful about sharing them without checking them out - not because it's a big deal, but because their opponents will make it a big deal.
                  My 'faith' designation is 'Christian'. But I do not want the label "Christian" leading to mockery of faith in Christ. Consequently, I apologize to those of you reading words of mine written here that reflect poorly on the what Faith in Christ means, or what Faith in Christ can in fact do in terms of bringing Grace, Mercy, and Love into the world.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                    Interesting - makes sense.
                    Well, it's the best analogy for what I see when I watch them. Most anyone else I know doesn't seem to notice it much, and usually only after I point it out. My senses tend to pick up things most people have no idea is even there. For me it is like I have a 100x multiplier on how intense anything might be. It is good for some things, and terrible for others. I'm surrounded by people who don't have that level of sensitivity, so they aren't able to even notice when they do or make something that is unpleasant for me to be around.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      With Warren, she persisted even after it was proven false, so she doesn't get a pass on "I really believed it was true".
                      She 'believed' it because she wanted to, it worked to her advantage, and she didn't have the moral character to admit she was wrong.

                      With Hillary, it's just another lie in a long pattern of lies.
                      The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

                        I'm not colorblind, but they look "off" to me too. Especially something like "It's a Wonderful Life".
                        yeah - it's a process that hasn't reached 'invisibility' yet. Same with computer animation of dead people like in the recent Star Wars movies. Close - but no cigar - yet.
                        My 'faith' designation is 'Christian'. But I do not want the label "Christian" leading to mockery of faith in Christ. Consequently, I apologize to those of you reading words of mine written here that reflect poorly on the what Faith in Christ means, or what Faith in Christ can in fact do in terms of bringing Grace, Mercy, and Love into the world.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post
                          Well, it's the best analogy for what I see when I watch them. Most anyone else I know doesn't seem to notice it much, and usually only after I point it out. My senses tend to pick up things most people have no idea is even there. For me it is like I have a 100x multiplier on how intense anything might be. It is good for some things, and terrible for others. I'm surrounded by people who don't have that level of sensitivity, so they aren't able to even notice when they do or make something that is unpleasant for me to be around.
                          Color is an interesting thing -- I read about the military in WWII recruiting colorblind people because they could look at camouflaged scenes and pictures and easily spot the 'hidden'.

                          And night vision - mine seems to be above normal.
                          Last edited by Cow Poke; 05-05-2021, 10:24 AM.
                          The first to state his case seems right until another comes and cross-examines him.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

                            yeah - it's a process that hasn't reached 'invisibility' yet. Same with computer animation of dead people like in the recent Star Wars movies. Close - but no cigar - yet.
                            Unless they make a huge breakthrough I doubt it will ever be invisible to me. Not only do I seem to see these things more intensely*, but everything seems to be at a lower framerate compared to what others see. My example for that would be "Into the Spiderverse" movie. Everyone else around me seems to think it looks at worst a little choppy. For me it looks like it is running at maybe 6 frames per second max. They animated that movie on twos, so it is running technically at 12 frames per second. Despite really liking the story I had to take breaks because of how off putting the low frame rate was.

                            *I don't mean I have better vision. I have mild astigmatism combined with somewhat more myopia. I just seem to notice differences in colors, brightness, etc. that others don't.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                              Color is an interesting thing -- I read about the military in WWII recruiting colorblind people because they could look at camouflaged scenes and pictures and easily spot the 'hidden'.

                              And night vision - mine seems to be above normal.
                              Yeah, the pattern would stand out more since you're not processing the color information. The best comparison I can make it changing the graphical settings in a video games so you can see things more clearly. In fact some tournament players will intentionally turn the graphics settings down to the lowest possible for two reasons.

                              1. Things stand out more.
                              2. You get higher frames per second, which means they see things happen before those who have lower frames per second.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

                                Early Technicolor often looks off in a similar way to "colorized" black and white movies. In the latter I'm able to see a second layer to everything. It's almost like how your brain looks at a movie with those old red and blue 3D glasses. Early Technicolor has a similar look, but not quite as pronounced.
                                IIRC, the first color movies only used two colors instead of the three used today

                                I'm always still in trouble again

                                "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                                "Overall I would rate the withdrawal from Afghanistan as by far the best thing Biden's done" --Starlight
                                "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                                Comment

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