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Trump and QAnon gang remain the most influential power

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  • Gondwanaland
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    I'm not arguing that point, but you do seem quite unwilling to acknowledge the point I am making.

    Perhaps more concisely, "blueAnon" is a term created to mock those that express concern over the GOP's connection to QAnon. It doesn't describe any actual conspiracy theory that developed on its own or is adhered to by an actual group of people.

    Now I'm absolutely sure you are smart enough to come up with some retort to that. But if you do, the only thing it proves is that you have no interest in civil or rational discourse.
    Actually it was created to collectively describe the group of conspiracy theorists on the left, who have a great deal more power than QAnoners on the right.

    It does, in fact, describe multiple conspiracy theories that developed on their own and are adhered to by actual groups of Democrats: Russiagate, Ukrainegate, Sicknick conspiracy theories, etc., etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gondwanaland
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    The issue is not QAnon per se. We've had moon landing deniers, holocaust deniers, the illuminatti, 911 conspiracists, JFK shooting conspiracists etc etc etc

    The issue is the widespread adoption of QAnon by a large contingent of GOP members, usually stanch Trump supporters, his refusal to speak against the conspiracy itself and call it what it is, and their close association with not just members of the GOP, but elected officials in the GOP. QAnon is not just nuttery, it's on the fast track to becoming institutionalized nuttery and it is gaining access to real power.
    Except BlueAnon similarly has a lot of influence in Democrat members, including in office. Indeed, the Sicknick conspiracy theory was used by Democrat House Managers in setting up the Impeachment 2: Impeachment Boogaloo. Countless Democrats in power pushed the Russiagate conspiracy theory, and the Jussie Smollet conspiracy theory, etc.. BlueAnon isn't just on the fast track of gaining access to real power, it has it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gondwanaland
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    Yeah exactly - it's a made up term by those that want to play down their own party's connections to QAnon.
    1. Qanon is a made up term as well. Most new words are......

    2. Your dear friend Shuny here on this forum showed us that BlueAnon and their conspiracy theories are QUITE real and quite influential.

    3. My party does not have a connection to QAnon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post
    QAnon is a well defined conspiracy theory.
    I beg to differ. Just the fact that you added they also "tend to adhere" proves it. It is a collection of beliefs placed under one unbrella. I've known two people who said they tought QAnon had merit, and one of them despised Trump. So go figure.

    QAnon adherents also tend to adhere to the idea there was 'Regional corrution in the 2020 general election, which is not exacly 'nutty' (i.e. it is possible there could have been some - on both sides of course). What is nutty about that is that it is believed in spite of the fact there is no evidence for any corruption on a scale that could have actually changed the outcome, likewise no evidence of a vast conspiracy to defraud the election process.

    Then I would submit you are not looking.
    No, I just think we rely on different sources.

    Given that to seriously believe what QAnon claims, one is required to have at best a tenuous grasp of reality:

    They are dangerous to everyone when they start getting elected to Congressional office. Taylor Green and Boebert is two such persons.

    They are dangerous when they get elected in local elections, as they have in Michigan:
    Do you think it is dangerous when Muslims or Mormons are elected? How about atheists or Christians? People have all sorts of unprovable beliefs that haven't become "dangerous." My father said he was positively paranoid when JFK was elected because he believed the pope would start running the country.

    https://time.com/5955248/qanon-local-elections/

    They are also dangerous when they are granted the power to lead and monitor the audit of an election without the requisite safeguards to prevent corruption of the ballots or their chain of custody, as they have been in Arizona.

    https://www.salon.com/2021/04/28/qan...rump-comeback/

    Source: above
    The audit is being conducted by Florida-based tech company Cyber Ninjas, owned by Doug Logan, a known QAnon conspiracy theorist who, in advance of the recount, speculated that it would garner an extra 200,000 votes for Donald Trump, according to the Huffington Post.
    Two things. 1) they will never dig up enough votes to change the election outcome. 2) Even if they did, what's done is done. There's no chance of a redo.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxmixmudd
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post

    Which specific conspiracy are you speaking about? Regional corruption in the 2020 general election? There's nothing "nutty" about that.
    QAnon is a well defined conspiracy theory. QAnon adherents also tend to adhere to the idea there was 'Regional corrution in the 2020 general election, which is not exacly 'nutty' (i.e. it is possible there could have been some - on both sides of course). What is nutty about that is that it is believed in spite of the fact there is no evidence for any corruption on a scale that could have actually changed the outcome, likewise no evidence of a vast conspiracy to defraud the election process.


    All assumption. I don't see any widespread nuttery.
    Then I would submit you are not looking.

    The QAnon stuff I had heard was that there are elitist pedophiles running amuck in government and Trump is some sort of savior attempting to crush the degenerates. If this is what you are talking about, then fine. But such weird beliefs aren't particularly dangerous to anyone - and I doubt Trump would deny it because it would mean losing votes.
    Given that to seriously believe what QAnon claims, one is required to have at best a tenuous grasp of reality:

    They are dangerous to everyone when they start getting elected to Congressional office. Taylor Green and Boebert is two such persons.

    They are dangerous when they get elected in local elections, as they have in Michigan:

    https://time.com/5955248/qanon-local-elections/

    They are also dangerous when they are granted the power to lead and monitor the audit of an election without the requisite safeguards to prevent corruption of the ballots or their chain of custody, as they have been in Arizona.

    https://www.salon.com/2021/04/28/qan...rump-comeback/

    Source: above

    The audit is being conducted by Florida-based tech company Cyber Ninjas, owned by Doug Logan, a known QAnon conspiracy theorist who, in advance of the recount, speculated that it would garner an extra 200,000 votes for Donald Trump, according to the Huffington Post.

    © Copyright Original Source




    And they are also dangerous when they become part of and participate in an insurrection on the Capitol as they did Jan 6.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/qanon-emer...ry?id=75347445
    Last edited by oxmixmudd; 05-03-2021, 11:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    I'm not arguing that point, but you do seem quite unwilling to acknowledge the point I am making.

    Perhaps more concisely, "blueAnon" is a term created to mock those that express concern over the GOP's connection to QAnon. It doesn't describe any actual conspiracy theory that developed on its own or is adhered to by an actual group of people.
    Not true at all. Or are you denying that there are conspiracy theories originating from the political left?


    Now I'm absolutely sure you are smart enough to come up with some retort to that. But if you do, the only thing it proves is that you have no interest in civil or rational discourse.
    I want you to FINALLY come to the realization that you are neither objective or impartial in any discussion that involves Donald Trump or anything that has been attached to him. Until you can admit to that, then it's YOU who isn't interested in rational discourse.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxmixmudd
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post

    That a collection of letters or pictures describe a concrete physical thing in no way means the word itself isn't still made up. All words are made up. That you don't like a concept doesn't make it nonexistent either.
    I'm not arguing that point, but you do seem quite unwilling to acknowledge the point I am making.

    Perhaps more concisely, "blueAnon" is a term created to mock those that express concern over the GOP's connection to QAnon. It doesn't describe any actual conspiracy theory that developed on its own or is adhered to by an actual group of people.

    Now I'm absolutely sure you are smart enough to come up with some retort to that. But if you do, the only thing it proves is that you have no interest in civil or rational discourse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    “ALL words are made-up: Do you think we find them fully formed on the ocean floor, or mine from them in some remote part of Wales?”


    - Kory Stamper lexicographer (that is, a writer and editor of dictionaries) at Merriam-Webster (the dictionary).

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    The issue is not QAnon per se. We've had moon landing deniers, holocaust deniers, the illuminatti, 911 conspiracists, JFK shooting conspiracists etc etc etc

    The issue is the widespread adoption of QAnon by a large contingent of GOP members, usually stanch Trump supporters, his refusal to speak against the conspiracy itself and call it what it is ...
    Which specific conspiracy are you speaking about? Regional corruption in the 2020 general election? There's nothing "nutty" about that.

    and their close association with not just members of the GOP, but elected officials in the GOP. QAnon is not just nuttery, it's on the fast track to becoming institutionalized nuttery and it is gaining access to real power.
    All assumption. I don't see any widespread nuttery. The QAnon stuff I had heard was that there are elitist pedophiles running amuck in government and Trump is some sort of savior attempting to crush the degenerates. If this is what you are talking about, then fine. But such weird beliefs aren't particularly dangerous to anyone - and I doubt Trump would deny it because it would mean losing votes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    All words are created by people. But not all words are 'made up'. Most words describe real things. Table, Chair, Gasoline, walking, singing etc. Blueanon belongs along side Unicorn, Awk, Goblin and a whole host of 'made up' things that don't exist in the real world.
    That a collection of letters or pictures describe a concrete physical thing in no way means the word itself isn't still made up. All words are made up. That you don't like a concept doesn't make it nonexistent either.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxmixmudd
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post

    All words are made up

    -Thor
    All words are created by people. But not all words are 'made up'. Most words describe real things. Table, Chair, Gasoline, walking, singing etc. Blueanon belongs along side Unicorn, Awk, Goblin and a whole host of 'made up' things that don't exist in the real world.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxmixmudd
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post

    All QAnon proves is that there are plenty of nuts and conspiracists in the world. You may highlight one faction of them for your political advantage, but they are all over the place, and all over the political map, and they believe all sorts of nonsense.
    The issue is not QAnon per se. We've had moon landing deniers, holocaust deniers, the illuminatti, 911 conspiracists, JFK shooting conspiracists etc etc etc

    The issue is the widespread adoption of QAnon by a large contingent of GOP members, usually stanch Trump supporters, his refusal to speak against the conspiracy itself and call it what it is, and their close association with not just members of the GOP, but elected officials in the GOP. QAnon is not just nuttery, it's on the fast track to becoming institutionalized nuttery and it is gaining access to real power.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill the Cat
    replied
    Originally posted by oxmixmudd View Post

    Yeah exactly - it's a made up term by those that want to play down their own party's connections to QAnon.
    All words are made up

    -Thor

    Leave a comment:


  • oxmixmudd
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill the Cat View Post
    Urban Dictionary: Blue Anon

    Blue Anon

    The definition of "Blue Anon" is "a loosely organized network of Democrat voters, politicians and media personalities who spread left-wing conspiracy theories."
    "Blue Anon adherents fervently believe that right-wing extremists are going to storm Capitol Hill any day now and "remove" lawmakers from office, hence the need for the deployment of thousands of National Guard stationed at the US Capitol."
    Yeah exactly - it's a made up term by those that want to play down their own party's connections to QAnon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post

    Cannot prove the negative. It can be proved that QAnon is widely believed and endorsed by Republicans including QAnon conspiracies..

    Can you prove that it exists?
    All QAnon proves is that there are plenty of nuts and conspiracists in the world. You may highlight one faction of them for your political advantage, but they are all over the place, and all over the political map, and they believe all sorts of nonsense.

    Leave a comment:

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