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Patriot Party

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post
    This seems like a bad idea, Trump floating the idea of a new "Patriot Party". Its existence would only guarantee Democratic victories for the near future. Besides, most of his platform works well within the Libertarian Party (which has gone astray lately). He can join there.

    https://www.oann.com/report-presiden...patriot-party/

    President Trump appears to be keeping politics on the horizon with talks of forming his own political party.

    On Tuesday, reports said the President discussed forming a so-called “Patriot party” with some of his top aides and supporters. Traditionally, third parties have failed to gain steam in challenging both the Democrat and Republican parties. However, due to his large base of supporters and the record number of people who voted for him in 2020, many believe President Trump has what it takes to carry on the movement.

    According to Politico, he spent days calling his close advisors to ask what he needs to do to “stay part of the conversation.” In his ‘farewell address,’ the President hinted at his future political career by saying the ‘MAGA movement’ is only just beginning.
    Pretty much. And as much as I'd like to see a realignment in the parties and the formation of new viable third parties, doing so unilaterally would just ensure leftist dominion for the next generation.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

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    • #32
      This article goes over some of the reasons the "Patriot Party" is unlikely to do much of anything:
      https://reason.com/2021/01/21/heres-...litical-force/

      Especially this excerpt:
      It takes a lot of thankless, expensive drudgery without an immediate, flashy payoff. Not exactly what you'd expect from a leisure-loving 74-year-old corner-cutter who isn't exactly known for his lengthy attention span.

      "At the risk of understatement," says Libertarian Party Chair Joe Bishop-Henchman, "starting a new political party is very hard. It requires a lot of money, a lot of work, a lot of volunteers. We'll see, but it's very difficult to do."

      Aside from the ballot-access hurdles (on which more below), there is an important fundraising bottleneck at the beginning of a new party's life: The incumbents, including minor parties, that have "national committees" as recognized by the Federal Elections Commissions (FEC), are able to accept donations at $35,000 a pop. Individual campaigns along the lines of a prospective Trump 2024? Just $5,000.

      And here's the catch about graduating to the big boys' fundraising club: The FEC won't grant national committee status until a political party holds a national convention, establishes national headquarters, sets up state party committees, and has a "sufficient number of party-designated federal candidates on the ballot in a sufficient number of states in different geographic areas." In other words, the Patriot Party better get cranking right now to compete in a whole bunch of 2022 House and Senate races; in the meantime, the candidates and the party will have to either self-finance (never a Trump specialty) or collect donations at a fraction of their competitors' size for a minimum of two years.

      "You almost have to through an election cycle before you get that qualification," says Constitution Party Chair James Clymer, citing Ross Perot's experience self-financing his independent run in 1992 before forming the Reform Party. "The first time around, unless you have somebody who's willing to spend their own money in a big way, it makes it much more difficult to establish."

      Trump? Willing to spend his own money in a big way? On other people?

      Also:
      Ballot access is a huge pain for third parties in non-presidential races. Trump could pretty easily (if expensively) get on most or all ballots in 2024, but GOP defectors who came along would be faced with roadblocks they've never before encountered.

      "Here's the most extreme example," says Richard Winger, editor of the indispensable third-party newsletter Ballot Access News. "The Georgia ballot access law for independent candidates and minor parties for the U.S. House was passed in 1943. So it's 77 years old, and in 77 years no minor party has ever been able to get on the ballot for U.S. House in Georgia if it's a regularly scheduled election." (There are lawsuits pending.)

      So while one could easily imagine Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R–Ga.), a woman with a history of QAnon enthusiasm and Parkland massacre false-flaggism who has vowed to impeach Joe Biden, following her president out of the GOP, Greene would as the law stands likely not be able to run for re-election.Elected politicians generall prefer not to volunteer for unemployment.

      "It's a mistake for anyone to think of ballot access as a package," Winger says. "It is radically different for president than it is for…offices like U.S. House and state legislature. For president, it's far easier. That's why you see the Libertarian Party four times has got its presidential nominee on the ballot in all jurisdictions, yet typically, you only see a fifth or a fourth of the U.S. House seats with a Libertarian running, maybe 5 percent of the state legislative seats up with Libertarians running….But for president, except for Texas and California, there's no really, really hard state."

      To achieve national committee status, and thus lower the burn rate of initial cash necessary to build a viable electoral apparatus, the Patriot Party would have to convince a significant number of Republican elected officials to jump into a fundraising and ballot-access climate harsher than they've ever contemplated.


      All this is assuming that Trump is actually going to try anything rather than this just being yet another idea he suggests and then completely forgets about two weeks later, much like when he said he wanted to eliminate birthright citizenship, which got a lot of attention, and then he promptly forgot all about it.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Ronson View Post
        I think Trump could pull the Libertarian Party together. He agrees with 95% of its platform already, and the remaining 5% is wrongheaded anyway and he could eject it or ignore it.

        But better than starting a new party, this way he could absorb those who are already Libertarians. That would be better than starting from scratch.
        Trump does not have a platform.

        When he was running for re-election he sat for an interview with Hannity. Hannity asked him for his policy priorities for his second term. Trump had none.

        Then at the Republican Nominating Convention, they could not come up with a platform for Trump's campaign.

        Trump is not really interested in doing the work involved in running (except for going to rallies), and he is especially not interested in the work involved in holding office. As we learned the hard way.

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        • #34
          I predict Trump will create a Patriot party and endorse Mike Pompeo.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by kccd View Post

            Trump does not have a platform.

            When he was running for re-election he sat for an interview with Hannity. Hannity asked him for his policy priorities for his second term. Trump had none.

            Then at the Republican Nominating Convention, they could not come up with a platform for Trump's campaign.

            Trump is not really interested in doing the work involved in running (except for going to rallies), and he is especially not interested in the work involved in holding office. As we learned the hard way.
            Trump's platform was laid out in 2016, and he pursued much of it afterward. Trump famously has difficulty staying on topic or explaining himself well. It doesn't surprise me that you considered him without a platform.

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