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CNN Article for the Left

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  • Originally posted by CivilDiscourse View Post
    And yet, democrats rail against the corrupting influence of dark money. I guess a little corruption isn't so bad.
    If you know that it's not corrupting you, then there is no reason not to take it. It's everyone else you have to worry about.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Stoic View Post

      If you know that it's not corrupting you, then there is no reason not to take it. It's everyone else you have to worry about.
      Nobody ever thinks that they are the ones being corrupted.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by CivilDiscourse View Post
        Nobody ever thinks that they are the ones being corrupted.
        Maybe not in those words, but I think people know when their actions in office are going to be influenced by contributors.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
          FWIU, dark money is not the same thing as corporations donating money, rather it's when nonprofit organizations, which are not required to disclose their donors, make contributions.
          Yup.

          open-secrets.jpg

          And from Wikipedia:

          Source: Dark money



          In the politics of the United States, dark money refers to political spending by nonprofit organizations — for example, 501(c)(4) (social welfare) 501(c)(5) (unions) and 501(c)(6) (trade association) groups — that are not required to disclose their donors.


          Source

          © Copyright Original Source






          Interesting...

          Source: 'Dark money,' used by both parties, featured in $100 million pro-Biden ad blitz



          As an influx of eleventh-hour outside money pours in to boost both presidential candidates, so-called "dark money" groups, which don't have to disclose the source of their funding, and a host of Silicon Valley executives are quietly fueling a massive last-minute ad campaign in support of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

          Future Forward, the super PAC fronting the effort, has mostly remained under the radar until late September, when it began rolling out a six-figure television ad blitz in support of the former vice president. The group is now on track to spend more than $108 million on pro-Biden television ads across the country in the final five weeks of the presidential race, becoming the single biggest political ad spender entering the home stretch of the 2020 election, according to ad placement data.

          Super PACs like Future Forward are required to disclose their donors to the Federal Election Commission, but the group reported nearly half of the $74 million it has brought in through mid-October as coming from politically active nonprofits, or so-called "dark money" groups that are not required to disclose their donors to the FEC the same way as PACs and super PACs do -- a tactic used increasingly frequently to mask who's funding political campaigns. The rest of the money that's been reported to the FEC is from a handful of Silicon Valley influencers and major Democratic donors.

          In early September, a similar last-minute boost for President Donald Trump popped up as the president repeatedly trailed his Democratic challenger in fundraising and spending. The super PAC, called Preserve America, backed by big-name GOP donors like casino mogul Sheldon Adelson, has since aired and reserved whopping $82 million worth of television ads in support of Trump, but it has not reported receiving contributions from dark money groups and instead reported receiving most of its funding -- $75 million -- from Adelson and his wife.



          Source

          © Copyright Original Source



          Source: Democrats used to rail against 'dark money.' Now they're better at it than the GOP


          Reformers wonder whether anyone can be trusted to dismantle a system that allows secret funding of campaigns.

          When allies of former President Barack Obama set up a super PAC to support his 2012 re-election, the White House disowned the group, The New York Times published a scathing editorial and former Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold of Wisconsin gave a speech warning Democrats would "lose our soul" if they allowed big money into the party.

          But fears of being outgunned trumped those principled objections and, less than a decade later, Democratic super PACs are spending more than Republican ones. Liberal "dark money" groups, which obscure the source of their funds, outspent conservative ones for the first time in 2018. Even reform hawks like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders had their own personal big-money groups supporting their presidential campaigns.

          "Their mantra of not 'unilaterally disarming' was really their justification for learning how to master super PACs and dark money and all that, and they're doing a better job of it right now than the Republicans," said Craig Holman, a lobbyist for the good-government group Public Citizen.


          Source

          © Copyright Original Source





          Just like how many people think that the super-rich support the Republicans it looks like the opposite is true.

          I'm always still in trouble again

          "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
          "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

          Comment


          • Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
            FWIU, dark money is not the same thing as corporations donating money, rather it's when nonprofit organizations, which are not required to disclose their donors, make contributions.
            Source: https://publicintegrity.org/politics/what-is-political-dark-money-and-is-it-bad/

            The two most common vehicles for dark money in politics are politically active nonprofits and corporate entities such as limited liability companies. Certain politically active nonprofits — notably those formed under sections 501(c)(4) and 501(c)(6) of the tax code — are generally not required to publicly disclose their donors. Meanwhile, when limited liability companies are formed in certain states, such as Delaware and Wyoming, they are essentially black boxes; the company’s name is basically the only thing known about them. These LLCs can be used to make political expenditures themselves or to donate to super PACs.

            © Copyright Original Source

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