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And AstraZeneca makes three

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  • And AstraZeneca makes three

    What you need to know about the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines
    .
    In the third such announcement in as many weeks, AstraZeneca revealed Monday that its vaccine candidate, developed by Oxford University, is up to 90 percent effective in clinical trials. Pfizer and its German partner, BioNTech, and Moderna have each reported vaccines that are 95 percent effective in trials.

    Personally, I'm looking to elbow my way into the front of the first line I can join, but I know from my students that there's a lot of hesitation out there. How many TWebbers are planning to get vaccinated as soon as it's available, how many want to wait for more testing, and how many don't think they need to vaccinate at all?
    .
    Next steps
    Companies will apply to federal regulators for authorization to provide the vaccines more broadly.
    FDA regulators will review the effectiveness, safety and manufacturing of each vaccine.
    An FDA advisory committee will vote on whether to recommend that the agency greenlight each vaccine.

    December:
    The FDA may authorize one or more vaccines.

    One or two days later:
    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee will discuss prioritizing vaccines for high-risk groups.

    End of 2020:
    The government projects that Pfizer and Moderna will provide 40 million doses, enough for 20 million people, by the end of the year. AstraZeneca has said the first 4 million doses could be ready in December, and 40 million could be delivered in the first quarter of 2021.

    As an at-risk college professor, I'm really hoping to be in that first group.

  • #2
    Orange man bad, vaccine bad. Joe and Camala approved this message.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
      What you need to know about the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines
      .
      In the third such announcement in as many weeks, AstraZeneca revealed Monday that its vaccine candidate, developed by Oxford University, is up to 90 percent effective in clinical trials. Pfizer and its German partner, BioNTech, and Moderna have each reported vaccines that are 95 percent effective in trials.

      Personally, I'm looking to elbow my way into the front of the first line I can join, but I know from my students that there's a lot of hesitation out there. How many TWebbers are planning to get vaccinated as soon as it's available, how many want to wait for more testing, and how many don't think they need to vaccinate at all?
      .
      Next steps
      Companies will apply to federal regulators for authorization to provide the vaccines more broadly.
      FDA regulators will review the effectiveness, safety and manufacturing of each vaccine.
      An FDA advisory committee will vote on whether to recommend that the agency greenlight each vaccine.

      December:
      The FDA may authorize one or more vaccines.

      One or two days later:
      A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee will discuss prioritizing vaccines for high-risk groups.

      End of 2020:
      The government projects that Pfizer and Moderna will provide 40 million doses, enough for 20 million people, by the end of the year. AstraZeneca has said the first 4 million doses could be ready in December, and 40 million could be delivered in the first quarter of 2021.

      As an at-risk college professor, I'm really hoping to be in that first group.
      I'm border-line at risk but I'd really like to wait a bit to see if there are any negative consequences to the vaccines. This has been rushed (for good reason) so there hasn't been the level of testing that such things are usually put through.

      I'm always still in trouble again

      "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
      "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

      Comment


      • #4
        I already had COVID but obviously I'm taking it as soon as scientists deem it safe.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
          I'm border-line at risk but I'd really like to wait a bit to see if there are any negative consequences to the vaccines. This has been rushed (for good reason) so there hasn't been the level of testing that such things are usually put through.
          There are negative effects being reported. Transitory, from what I've read, lasting about a day, but including some of the same symptoms of covid itself, muscle aches, fatigue, headaches, and of concern because all three of the current vaccines that have been shown effective require two doses.

          Doctors say CDC should warn people the side effects from Covid vaccine shots won't be 'a walk in the park'
          .
          "We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park," Fryhofer said during a virtual meeting with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, an outside group of medical experts that advise the CDC. She is also a liaison to the committee. "They are going to know they had a vaccine. They are probably not going to feel wonderful. But they've got to come back for that second dose."

          My biggest worry is the marine's kid. Secondary is my wish to get back into a classroom again. It's getting tougher and tougher to convince my kids something that's not just as good is good enough, for now. And I really miss seeing them in person. So no question, it's worth the side effects for me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Juvenal View Post

            There are negative effects being reported. Transitory, from what I've read, lasting about a day, but including some of the same symptoms of covid itself, muscle aches, fatigue, headaches, and of concern because all three of the current vaccines that have been shown effective require two doses.

            Doctors say CDC should warn people the side effects from Covid vaccine shots won't be 'a walk in the park'
            .
            "We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park," Fryhofer said during a virtual meeting with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, an outside group of medical experts that advise the CDC. She is also a liaison to the committee. "They are going to know they had a vaccine. They are probably not going to feel wonderful. But they've got to come back for that second dose."

            My biggest worry is the marine's kid. Secondary is my wish to get back into a classroom again. It's getting tougher and tougher to convince my kids something that's not just as good is good enough, for now. And I really miss seeing them in person. So no question, it's worth the side effects for me.
            Yeah I saw that report yesterday. Still, there may be other consequences not seen. And don't get me wrong I'm anything but an anti-vaxxer.

            I'm always still in trouble again

            "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
            "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by LiconaFan97 View Post
              I already had COVID but obviously I'm taking it as soon as scientists deem it safe.
              Not obvious to me, but unless there are side effects worse than already being reported, I don't see a downside. Suspenders or belt or both works for me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                Yeah I saw that report yesterday. Still, there may be other consequences not seen. And don't get me wrong I'm anything but an anti-vaxxer.
                I remember you posting your worries in one of my earlier threads after learning one of your co-workers might have been infected.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Juvenal View Post

                  I remember you posting your worries in one of my earlier threads after learning one of your co-workers might have been infected.
                  Yup. Had to take a leave of absence as a result. It turned out that she was fine (well, at least didn't have it). One of my other (now former) co-workers has two family members who died from it (in California and Texas), neither were AFAICT, in at risk groups.

                  I'm always still in trouble again

                  "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                  "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                    What you need to know about the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines
                    .
                    In the third such announcement in as many weeks, AstraZeneca revealed Monday that its vaccine candidate, developed by Oxford University, is up to 90 percent effective in clinical trials. Pfizer and its German partner, BioNTech, and Moderna have each reported vaccines that are 95 percent effective in trials.

                    Personally, I'm looking to elbow my way into the front of the first line I can join, but I know from my students that there's a lot of hesitation out there. How many TWebbers are planning to get vaccinated as soon as it's available, how many want to wait for more testing, and how many don't think they need to vaccinate at all?
                    .
                    Next steps
                    Companies will apply to federal regulators for authorization to provide the vaccines more broadly.
                    FDA regulators will review the effectiveness, safety and manufacturing of each vaccine.
                    An FDA advisory committee will vote on whether to recommend that the agency greenlight each vaccine.

                    December:
                    The FDA may authorize one or more vaccines.

                    One or two days later:
                    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee will discuss prioritizing vaccines for high-risk groups.

                    End of 2020:
                    The government projects that Pfizer and Moderna will provide 40 million doses, enough for 20 million people, by the end of the year. AstraZeneca has said the first 4 million doses could be ready in December, and 40 million could be delivered in the first quarter of 2021.

                    As an at-risk college professor, I'm really hoping to be in that first group.
                    Personally have zero interest in vaccinating, at least until this time in 2021 if not later. Let the early people be the guinea pigs, and see how it goes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                      Yup. Had to take a leave of absence as a result. It turned out that she was fine (well, at least didn't have it). One of my other (now former) co-workers has two family members who died from it (in California and Texas), neither were AFAICT, in at risk groups.
                      A bunch of my students' parents have come down with it, but none have died as far as I know. I haven't been in a physical classroom since March. It was swell at first, because of all the cool things to learn, but the swelling's gone down.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Juvenal View Post

                        A bunch of my students' parents have come down with it, but none have died as far as I know. I haven't been in a physical classroom since March. It was swell at first, because of all the cool things to learn, but the swelling's gone down.


                        Good to see you still have a sense of humor. As of late it seems that you've lost it.


                        I'm always still in trouble again

                        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                          What you need to know about the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines
                          .
                          In the third such announcement in as many weeks, AstraZeneca revealed Monday that its vaccine candidate, developed by Oxford University, is up to 90 percent effective in clinical trials. Pfizer and its German partner, BioNTech, and Moderna have each reported vaccines that are 95 percent effective in trials.

                          Personally, I'm looking to elbow my way into the front of the first line I can join, but I know from my students that there's a lot of hesitation out there. How many TWebbers are planning to get vaccinated as soon as it's available, how many want to wait for more testing, and how many don't think they need to vaccinate at all?
                          .
                          Next steps
                          Companies will apply to federal regulators for authorization to provide the vaccines more broadly.
                          FDA regulators will review the effectiveness, safety and manufacturing of each vaccine.
                          An FDA advisory committee will vote on whether to recommend that the agency greenlight each vaccine.

                          December:
                          The FDA may authorize one or more vaccines.

                          One or two days later:
                          A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee will discuss prioritizing vaccines for high-risk groups.

                          End of 2020:
                          The government projects that Pfizer and Moderna will provide 40 million doses, enough for 20 million people, by the end of the year. AstraZeneca has said the first 4 million doses could be ready in December, and 40 million could be delivered in the first quarter of 2021.

                          As an at-risk college professor, I'm really hoping to be in that first group.
                          I could see getting the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine, but if I have to choose between AstraZeneca and not getting vaccinated, I'll probably choose the latter.

                          https://komonews.com/news/coronaviru...-study-results

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It seems this has likely been overhyped...

                            [The price of AstraZeneca’s shares actually dropped on the news, and an analysis from an investment bank concluded, “We believe that this product will never be licensed in the US.”
                            ( https://www.wired.com/story/the-astr...t-up-to-snuff/ )
                            "I am not angered that the Moral Majority boys campaign against abortion. I am angry when the same men who say, "Save OUR children" bellow "Build more and bigger bombers." That's right! Blast the children in other nations into eternity, or limbless misery as they lay crippled from "OUR" bombers! This does not jell." - Leonard Ravenhill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Juvenal View Post
                              Personally, I'm looking to elbow my way into the front of the first line I can join, but I know from my students that there's a lot of hesitation out there. How many TWebbers are planning to get vaccinated as soon as it's available, how many want to wait for more testing, and how many don't think they need to vaccinate at all?
                              I will wait. I am not in a high risk category and am rarely if ever in situations where I think I have a particularly good chance of catching COVID. Given that there will not be enough vaccinations for everyone at first, there is little reason for me to try to get it right away when there are those who would be in more need of it are... well, in more need of it.

                              I also must admit a certain hesitance to get it right away due to the fact this was put through quickly, as understandable as it was. While the "rushing" is reported to have been done in getting past the red tape for production rather than skipping through safety tests, it nevertheless is a little concerning to me. Still, even if not for that, the elements in my first paragraph would be sufficient for me to wait.

                              Comment

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