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A galling fact

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  • #16
    Originally posted by TheLurch View Post
    The plant DOES have to produce a gall, because the parasite has manipulated its internal signaling pathways.
    Right, but I'm saying the plant is going out of its way to make a home for the parasite, something it doesn't have to do, in that sense. And some plants are resistant to galls, conifers, for instance, so resistance can develop.

    Blessings,
    Lee
    "What I pray of you is, to keep your eye upon Him, for that is everything. Do you say, 'How am I to keep my eye on Him?' I reply, keep your eye off everything else, and you will soon see Him. All depends on the eye of faith being kept on Him. How simple it is!" (J.B. Stoney)

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by lee_merrill View Post
      Right, but I'm saying the plant is going out of its way to make a home for the parasite, something it doesn't have to do, in that sense. And some plants are resistant to galls, conifers, for instance, so resistance can develop.

      Blessings,
      Lee
      Yes, some develop resistance can develop, or have natural properties that prevent galling, so what? Galling is not detrimental to the survival of trees, nor does it reduce the available nutrients to the trees. If there is no survival value to develop resistance against the galling, why would the trees evolve to prevent galling?
      Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
      Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
      But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

      go with the flow the river knows . . .

      Frank

      I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by lee_merrill View Post
        Right, but I'm saying the plant is going out of its way to make a home for the parasite, something it doesn't have to do, in that sense.
        No, it's not going out of its way. The parasite has evolved the ability to manipulate the host pathways that signal for cell growth and nutrient delivery. The plant is responding as it would when those same signals tell it which branches to grow more.

        No matter how many times you repeat your ideas on this topic, they won't stop being stupid. Try understanding what you're talking about, and use that to change your ideas.

        Originally posted by lee_merrill View Post
        And some plants are resistant to galls, conifers, for instance, so resistance can develop.
        Conifers are relatively distantly related to other trees, with lots of distinct features.
        "Any sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from trolling."

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
          Yes, some develop resistance can develop, or have natural properties that prevent galling, so what? Galling is not detrimental to the survival of trees, nor does it reduce the available nutrients to the trees.
          They are indeed detrimental, "For the plant, the entire effort involved in the gall formation is of no apparent benefit, it is more of a harm because it requires nutrients, reduces the assimilating leaf area and disrupts the normal course of growth, sometimes even the most valuable parts of the plants: buds and seeds." (Evolution News). So developing resistance to galls would be beneficial.

          Blessings,
          Lee
          "What I pray of you is, to keep your eye upon Him, for that is everything. Do you say, 'How am I to keep my eye on Him?' I reply, keep your eye off everything else, and you will soon see Him. All depends on the eye of faith being kept on Him. How simple it is!" (J.B. Stoney)

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by TheLurch View Post
            No, it's not going out of its way. The parasite has evolved the ability to manipulate the host pathways that signal for cell growth and nutrient delivery.
            So they take up nutrients, which could be better spent in other ways.

            Blessings,
            Lee
            "What I pray of you is, to keep your eye upon Him, for that is everything. Do you say, 'How am I to keep my eye on Him?' I reply, keep your eye off everything else, and you will soon see Him. All depends on the eye of faith being kept on Him. How simple it is!" (J.B. Stoney)

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by lee_merrill View Post
              They are indeed detrimental, "For the plant, the entire effort involved in the gall formation is of no apparent benefit, it is more of a harm because it requires nutrients, reduces the assimilating leaf area and disrupts the normal course of growth, sometimes even the most valuable parts of the plants: buds and seeds." (Evolution News). So developing resistance to galls would be beneficial.

              Blessings,
              Lee
              No they are NOT detrimental to the point that the trees cannot reproduce and survive well. Your reference in Evolution News is a bogus ID source. Please, please provide a better source in this case in dendrology. I have worked in the dendrology surveys in the forests of Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina for a number of years. Galling is everywhere in deciduous forests. The trees survive just fine.

              I believe The Lurch already found these claims utterly ridiculous. I just go into more detail with references from a profesisonal perspective.


              Source: https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-and-plant-advice/help-pests/plant-galls#:~:text=Galls%20are%20abnormal%20growths%20that,midges%2C%20wasps%2C%20or%20mites.


              MANAGEMENT

              Fortunately, galls, while unusual and sometimes even alarming in appearance, cause little permanent injury and seldom result in the death of the plant. For this reason chemical sprays are rarely necessary or recommended to treat gall infestations.

              By the time the galls become noticeable, the insect or mite causing the injury is protected from chemical sprays. If only a few galls are present, the affected part of the plant may be removed.

              © Copyright Original Source

              Last edited by shunyadragon; 09-09-2020, 06:12 PM.
              Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
              Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
              But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

              go with the flow the river knows . . .

              Frank

              I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

              Comment


              • #22
                I thought I would add a little basic high school biology here that may help. The parasite/host relationship is very similar to the predator/pray relationship in nature. The parasite and predator relationship is not to seriously effect the survival of the host or prey. For example: The predator usually preys on the old, weak, slow, less well adapted, and vulnerable young thinning the herd improving the survivability of the herd. You know natural selection. The relationship is the same between the parasite relationship to the host. It is the weak, less well adapted members of the species that do not survive, and the species survivibility is increased, you know natural selection.

                There are examples where a disease is introduce to a population, and the host does not survive like when humans introduced the Dutch Elm disease to the American Chestnut. Within thirty or forty years the American Chestnut was whipped out, because it could respond and resist the disease.
                Last edited by shunyadragon; 09-09-2020, 06:58 PM.
                Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                go with the flow the river knows . . .

                Frank

                I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                Comment

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