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Climate change and global warming 2020

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  • #31
    Source: https://bgr.com/2020/06/06/carbon-dioxide-earth-atmospheric-levels-climate-change/




    SCIENCE Carbon dioxide levels just hit a scary new high

    By Mike Wehner @MikeWehner
    June 6th, 2020 at 12:55 PM

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels reached a new record high based on a new report from scientists studying the trends.

    As a greenhouse gas, CO2 traps heat, gradually warming the Earth and prompting a number of serious changes.

    Warming ocean waters, dying reefs, stronger storms, and other climate disasters have been linked to climate change.

    In the midst of a worldwide health crisis, it can be easy to forget that humanity faces existential threats from multiple angles. The coronavirus pandemic will pass — either when we take measures to dramatically mitigate its spread or a vaccine or other treatment is developed — but when it does, our planet will still be in peril. The worst part is, it’s largely our fault.

    As AP reports, scientists revealed on Thursday that the highest-ever atmospheric carbon dioxide reading was recently taken in April. The measurement showed a concentration of as much as 17% in the atmosphere, and since human activity (the burning of fossil fuels) is the primary source for this carbon dioxide, it’s clear that we’re not doing nearly enough to prevent an eventual catastrophe.

    Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas. When greenhouses gasses build up in the atmosphere they trap heat, gradually warming the planet. It doesn’t happen all at once, and sometimes there are dips in the amount of greenhouse gas detected in the atmosphere, but the big picture reveals that the levels are sharply trending upward over time.

    This has a number of effects on the planet. It causes rising ocean temperatures that kill off vital reef systems that themselves protect coastal communities from being inundated by storm surges and devastating waves. It affects the weather, sparking bigger and more powerful storms, and we have plenty of evidence to show that the hotter the planet gets, the more damage hurricanes and other large storms deal.

    Droughts facilitate wildfires that topple entire communities and lives along with them. And of course, there’s the little matter of the food chain, which can be completely toppled as certain species are pushed to extinction by intolerable climate conditions in the sea and on land.

    Put simply, we’re really messing this up in a big way.

    “It illustrates how difficult it is — what a huge job it is — to bring emissions down,” NOAA senior scientist Pieter Tans said in a statement. “We are really committing the Earth to an enormous amount of warming for a very large time.”

    Historical data for carbon dioxide levels stretches back to the late 1950's. Comparing readings taken at that point in time to those taken now produces alarming results. All told, the amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere has risen by 31% in just that short time frame. The fact that CO2 tends to hang in the atmosphere for a very long time compounds the problem.

    © Copyright Original Source

    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

    Comment


    • #32
      This reference describes the dramatic rise in atmospheric CO2 in terms of ppm. The graph is impressive.

      Source: https://www.iflscience.com/environment/carbon-dioxide-concentrations-break-417ppm-for-the-first-time-in-history/



      Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Break 417ppm For The First Time In History

      In May, the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawai'i recorded a seasonal peak in the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) of 417.1 parts per million (ppm). This is the highest monthly reading of atmospheric CO2 ever recorded, 2.4ppm higher than the 2019 peak.

      Annual CO2 level growth averaged 0.8 ppm in the 1960s, 1.6 ppm in the 1980s, and 2.0 ppm in the 2000s. Over the last decade, it has averaged a 2.4 ppm increase annually. The cause, undisputably, is human-made emissions from energy production, transportation, and industry. Global attempts to curb emissions have so far been limited.

      “Progress in emissions reductions is not visible in the CO2 record,” Pieter Tans, a senior scientist with NOAA’s Global Monitoring Laboratory, said in a statement. “We continue to commit our planet – for centuries or longer – to more global heating, sea-level rise, and extreme weather events every year.”

      Due to the Covid-19 global pandemic causing a global economic reduction across all sectors, the daily emissions across most human sectors were much smaller in 2020. This is not currently reflected in the measurement from Mauna Loa and may not make any difference in the long run. While the reduction was dramatic across March, April, and May, it is not a long-term trend, and with the easing of lockdown measures in attempts to restart economies around the world, it is unlikely to be carried forward.

      “People may be surprised to hear that the response to the coronavirus outbreak hasn’t done more to influence CO2 levels,” said geochemist Ralph Keeling, who runs the Scripps Oceanography program at Mauna Loa. “But the buildup of CO2 is a bit like trash in a landfill. As we keep emitting, it keeps piling up. The crisis has slowed emissions, but not enough to show up perceptibly at Mauna Loa. What will matter much more is the trajectory we take coming out of this situation.”


      The carbon dioxide data on Mauna Loa from 1958 to today. NOAA and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
      Measurements of CO2 concentration on Mauna Loa began in 1958, and from 1974 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and two other research institutions have made complementary, independent measurements. This is the longest unbroken measurement of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

      The measurements were started by American scientist Charles David Keeling, who first realized that CO2 levels rose steadily year after year. He also noticed that the measurements showed a seasonal variation that peaked in May, before the increase in absorption of carbon dioxide from plants during the Boreal summer. The two effects produce a zig-zagging curve known as the Keeling Curve.

      © Copyright Original Source

      Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
      Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
      But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

      go with the flow the river knows . . .

      Frank

      I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

      Comment


      • #33
        The scar high of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is reminiscent of the great extinction at cause of the Great Extinction of the Permian where catastrophic global warming ended most life on earth.

        Source: http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/coal-burning-end-permian-mass-extinction-08561.html



        Coal-Burning Contributed to End-Permian Mass Extinction
        Jun 23, 2020 by News Staff

        An international team of geologists has found the first direct evidence that volcanic eruptions in the southern part of the Siberian Traps region 252 million years ago burned large volumes of coal and vegetation.

        The end-Permian extinction, also known as the Permian-Triassic extinction event and the Great Dying, is the Earth’s most severe mass extinction that peaked about 252.3 million years ago.

        The catastrophe killed off nearly 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species on the planet over the course of thousands of years.

        Calculations of sea water temperature indicate that at the peak of the extinction, the Earth underwent hot global warming, in which equatorial ocean temperatures exceeded 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit).

        Among the possible causes of this event, and one of the most long-hypothesized, is that massive burning coal led to catastrophic global warming, which in turn was devastating to life.

        To search for evidence to support this hypothesis, Arizona State University’s Professor Lindy Elkins-Tanton and colleagues looked at the Siberian Traps region, where it was known that the magmas and lavas from volcanic events burned a combination of vegetation and coal.

        They focused on the volcaniclastic rocks — rocks created by explosive volcanic eruptions — and collected over 500 kg of samples. “We found towering river cliffs of nothing but volcaniclastics, lining the river for hundreds of miles. It was geologically astounding,” Professor Elkins-Tanton said.

        As the samples were analyzed, the authors began seeing strange fragments in the volcaniclastics that seemed like burnt wood, and in some cases, burnt coal.
        Further field work turned up even more sites with charcoal, coal, and even some sticky organic-rich blobs in the rocks.

        The end-Permian extinction, also known as the Permian-Triassic extinction event and the Great Dying, is the Earth’s most severe mass extinction that peaked about 252.3 million years ago.

        The catastrophe killed off nearly 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species on the planet over the course of thousands of years.

        Calculations of sea water temperature indicate that at the peak of the extinction, the Earth underwent hot global warming, in which equatorial ocean temperatures exceeded 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit).

        Among the possible causes of this event, and one of the most long-hypothesized, is that massive burning coal led to catastrophic global warming, which in turn was devastating to life.

        To search for evidence to support this hypothesis, Arizona State University’s Professor Lindy Elkins-Tanton and colleagues looked at the Siberian Traps region, where it was known that the magmas and lavas from volcanic events burned a combination of vegetation and coal.

        They focused on the volcaniclastic rocks — rocks created by explosive volcanic eruptions — and collected over 500 kg of samples.

        “We found towering river cliffs of nothing but volcaniclastics, lining the river for hundreds of miles. It was geologically astounding,” Professor Elkins-Tanton said.

        As the samples were analyzed, the authors began seeing strange fragments in the volcaniclastics that seemed like burnt wood, and in some cases, burnt coal.

        Further field work turned up even more sites with charcoal, coal, and even some sticky organic-rich blobs in the rocks.

        “Our study shows that Siberian Traps magmas intruded into and incorporated coal and organic material,” Professor Elkins-Tanton said.

        “That gives us direct evidence that the magmas also combusted large quantities of coal and organic matter during eruption.”

        And the changes at the end-Permian extinction bear remarkable parallels to what is happening on Earth today, including burning hydrocarbons and coal, acid rain from sulfur, and even ozone-destroying halocarbons.

        “Seeing these similarities gives us extra impetus to take action now, and also to further understand how the Earth responds to changes like these in the longer term,” Professor Elkins-Tanton added.

        © Copyright Original Source



        The findings were published in the journal Geology.
        Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
        Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
        But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

        go with the flow the river knows . . .

        Frank

        I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

        Comment


        • #34
          The terminal effects of the weight of the industrial age of humanity has been demonstrated by the observations of the impact of COVID 19 of the human impact that is revealed in the COVID 19 lock down. It is odd that a catastrophy of a world pandemic can have a glimmer It is a lesson on how we may be able reduce and possibly turn the corner on the terminal effects of global warming.

          By the evidence we could be headed for a Permian extinction style event oi to the rise in CO2 in our atmosphere and other human effect to the degradation of our environment, which is due to the over population of the world.

          Source: https://scitechdaily.com/human-impact-on-wildlife-revealed-by-covid-19-lockdown/



          An international team of scientists is investigating how animals are responding to reduced levels of human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic.

          In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution on June 22, 2020, the leaders of a new global initiative explain how research during this devastating health crisis can inspire innovative strategies for sharing space on this increasingly crowded planet, with benefits for both wildlife and humans.

          Many countries around the world went into lockdown to control the spread of Covid-19. Brought about by the most tragic circumstances, this period of unusually reduced human mobility, which the article’s authors coined “anthropause,” can provide invaluable insights into human–wildlife interactions.

          There have been countless posts on social media over the past few months reporting unusual wildlife encounters. Anecdotal observations, especially from metropolitan areas, suggest that nature has responded to lockdown. There not only seem to be more animals than usual, but there are also some surprising visitors: pumas have been spotted prowling the streets of downtown Santiago, Chile, and dolphins recently showed up in untypically calm waters in the harbor of Trieste, Italy.

          New challenges for some species
          For other species, the pandemic may have created new challenges. For example, some urban-dwelling animals, like gulls, rats or monkeys, may struggle to make ends meet without access to human food. In more remote areas, reduced human presence may potentially put endangered species, such as rhinos or raptors, at increased risk of poaching or persecution. The authors emphasise that society’s priority must be to tackle the immense human tragedy and hardship caused by Covid-19. But, they argue that we cannot afford to miss the opportunity to chart, for the first time on a truly global scale, the extent to which modern human mobility affects wildlife.

          To address this challenge, researchers recently formed the “COVID-19 Bio-Logging Initiative”. This international consortium will investigate animals’ movements, behavior and stress levels, before, during and after Covid-19 lockdown, using data collected with nifty animal-attached electronic devices called “bio-loggers”. The article’s lead author, Christian Rutz, a biologist at the University of St Andrews, UK, and President of the International Bio-Logging Society, explains: “All over the world, field biologists have fitted animals with miniature tracking devices. These bio-loggers provide a goldmine of information on animal movement and behavior, which we can now tap to improve our understanding of human–wildlife interactions, with benefits for all.”

          The team will integrate results from a wide variety of animals, including fish, birds, and mammals, in an attempt to build a global picture of lockdown effects. Francesca Cagnacci, Senior Researcher at the Edmund Mach Foundation in Trento, Italy, and Principal Investigator of the Euromammals research network, says: “The international research community responded quickly to our recent call for collaboration, offering over 200 datasets for analysis. We are very grateful for this support.”

          So, what do the scientists hope to learn? Matthias-Claudio Loretto, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Radolfzell, Germany, explains that it will be possible to address previously intractable questions: “We will be able to investigate if the movements of animals in modern landscapes are predominantly affected by built structures, or by the presence of humans. That is a big deal.” These insights will in turn inspire innovative proposals for improving human–wildlife coexistence, according to Martin Wikelski, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Radolfzell and Principal Investigator in the Cluster of Excellence Centre for the Advanced Study of Collective Behaviour at the University of Konstanz, Germany. “Nobody is asking for humans to stay in permanent lockdown. But we may discover that relatively minor changes to our lifestyles and transport networks can potentially have significant benefits for both ecosystems and humans.”

          Coordinated global wildlife research during this period of crisis will provide unforeseen opportunities for humans to forge a mutually beneficial coexistence with other species, and to rediscover how important a healthy environment is for our own well-being.

          Reference: “COVID-19 lockdown allows researchers to quantify the effects of human activity on wildlife” by Christian Rutz, Matthias-Claudio Loretto, Amanda E. Bates, Sarah C. Davidson, Carlos M. Duarte, Walter Jetz, Mark Johnson, Akiko Kato, Roland Kays, Thomas Mueller, Richard B. Primack, Yan Ropert-Coudert, Marlee A. Tucker, Martin Wikelski and Francesca Cagnacci, 22 June 2020, Nature Ecology & Evolution.
          DOI: 10.1038/s41559-020-1237-z

          © Copyright Original Source

          Last edited by shunyadragon; 06-24-2020, 09:37 PM.
          Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
          Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
          But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

          go with the flow the river knows . . .

          Frank

          I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

          Comment


          • #35
            Source: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-is-the-south-pole-warming-so-quickly-its-complicated/



            Why Is the South Pole Warming So Quickly? It’s Complicated
            Much of the warming is linked to natural climate cycles happening thousands of miles away in the tropics

            By Chelsea Harvey, E&E News on June 30, 2020

            Remote Antarctica may feel like the most isolated place on Earth. Secluded at the bottom of the world and surrounded by the turbulent Southern Ocean, in many ways it's a step into another world.

            But, as it turns out, the icy continent is more closely connected to the rest of the planet than it appears.

            The South Pole is warming at a rate nearly three times faster than the global average, scientists have discovered. And much of that warming is linked to climate cycles happening thousands of miles away in the tropics.

            The findings were published yesterday in the journal Nature Climate Change.

            The study, led by Kyle Clem of Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, examined surface air temperatures at the world's southernmost weather observatory: the Amundsen-Scott station, located almost directly on top of the geographic South Pole. It's a lonely, snow-covered outpost in the middle of the Antarctic continent, in a place where winter temperatures can drop below minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

            The researchers found that temperatures there have been rising by about a degree Fahrenheit each decade since the start of the 1990s. That's about three times faster than the global average.

            Even more surprising, the trend represents a sudden reversal in conditions at the South Pole. For much of the 20th century — at least going back to the 1950s, when the weather station was first established — the South Pole was cooling down.

            So why the switch? According to the new study, shifting climate patterns in the tropics probably have played a big part.

            The researchers used a combination of observations and model simulations to investigate. They found that changing ocean temperatures in the tropical western Pacific have a big influence on warming at the South Pole.

            These ocean temperatures are regulated, in large part, by a natural climate cycle known as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, or IPO. The IPO causes western Pacific temperatures to swing back and forth between warm and cool phases every couple of decades or so.

            When the ocean is warmer, it interacts differently with the atmosphere. These atmospheric changes transport more warm air south into Antarctica.

            © Copyright Original Source

            Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
            Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
            But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

            go with the flow the river knows . . .

            Frank

            I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

            Comment


            • #36
              Most people are familiar with what are called Ice Caps as the polar Ice Capes. The definition of Ice Capes is where ice sheets begin and and radiate outward. Ice Caps form at differnt places at the poles.

              Source: https://earther.gizmodo.com/a-pair-of-canadian-ice-caps-has-disappeared-completely-1844592208



              A Pair of Canadian Ice Caps Has Disappeared Completely

              Yessenia Funes

              A set of polar ice caps has literally disappeared. We don’t need any more evidence that the Earth is warming to the point of mass instability, but this latest discovery is unsettling, to say the least.

              Scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) said last week that the St. Patrick Bay ice caps in the northeastern Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada, are nowhere to be seen on satellite imagery. Researchers long suspected that this would be possible, but the prediction has come a bit sooner than expected.

              An ice cap is a sort of mini-glacier. These formations stretch less than 19,300 square miles, so they’re smaller than ice sheets. The St. Patrick Bay ice caps were truly tiny: In 1959, the largest one was merely 2.9 square miles, and the smaller one was only 1.1 square miles. By 2001, the two ice caps had shrunk to 62% and 58% of their 1959 size, respectively.

              In 2017, a team published a paper suggesting that the ice caps would be gone in the next five years due to rapidly warming temperatures in the Arctic. Well, seems it was more like three years. The ice caps are missing in satellite photos from July 14, 2020. This year has been especially brutal throughout the region. Recent months have been plagued by heatwaves and wildfires across the Arctic. This extreme heat likely contributed to the melting of the ice caps. Research has found that summers in the region haven’t been this warm in 115,000 years.

              © Copyright Original Source

              Last edited by shunyadragon; 08-04-2020, 10:33 AM.
              Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
              Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
              But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

              go with the flow the river knows . . .

              Frank

              I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

              Comment


              • #37
                Year to date (January-July) world temperatures put 2020 in competition with the warmest year on recent record. The Southwestern states are breaking all records on high temperatures. and severe drought this summer.

                Source: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/202007



                Global Climate Report - July 2020

                Introduction

                Temperature anomalies and percentiles are shown on the gridded maps below. The anomaly map on the left and the percentiles map on the right are a product of a merged land surface temperature (Global Historical Climatology Network, GHCN) and sea surface temperature (ERSST version 5) anomaly analysis. The anomalies maps tell us whether the temperature observed for a specific place and time period was warmer or cooler than a reference value and by how much. While the percentile map provides additional information by placing the temperature anomaly observed into historical perspective, showing how the most current month, season or year compares with the past. Temperature anomalies for land and ocean are analyzed separately and then merged to form the global analysis. For more information, please visit NCEI's Global Surface Temperature Anomalies page.

                Temperature

                In the atmosphere, 500-millibar height pressure anomalies correlate well with temperatures at the Earth's surface. The average position of the upper-level ridges of high pressure and troughs of low pressure—depicted by positive and negative 500-millibar height anomalies on the July 2020 map—is generally reflected by areas of positive and negative temperature anomalies at the surface, respectively.

                Monthly Temperature: July 2020

                The July 2020 global land and ocean surface temperature of 0.92°C (1.66°F) above the 20th century average tied with 2016 as the second highest July global temperature since records began in 1880. This value was only 0.01°C (0.02°F) shy of tying the record warm July of 2019. July 2020 was the 44th consecutive July and the 427th consecutive month with temperatures, at least nominally, above the 20th century average. Nine of the 10 warmest Julys on record have occurred since 2010. The six warmest Julys on record have occurred since 2015.

                Global Land and Ocean Temperature Anomalies for July

                The month was characterized by warmer-than-average temperatures across much of the global land and ocean surface. The most notable warm temperature departures of +2.0°C (+3.6°F) were present across the North Pacific Ocean, the southwestern and northeastern contiguous U.S., eastern Canada, and across parts of western Asia and eastern Antarctica. Record-warm July temperatures were widespread across the North Indian Ocean, southeastern Asia, and the western Pacific Ocean. Other areas with record-warm July temperatures were present across parts of the Caribbean Sea, northern South America, North America, and the North Pacific Ocean. Overall, July 2020 had 8.67% of the world's land and ocean surfaces with a record July temperature. This was the second highest percentage for July record warm temperatures across the globe since records began in 1951, behind July 2015 (10.23%).

                According to the July 2020 percentiles map, cooler-than-average July temperatures were limited to small parts of northern North America, the northern Atlantic Ocean, Scandinavia, eastern China, southern South America, and the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. No land or ocean areas had a record-cold July temperature.

                Temperature Percentiles

                The global land-only surface temperature for July 2020 was the second highest on record at 1.23°C (2.21°F) above average and only 0.01°C (0.02°F) less than the record-warm July set in 2017. The global ocean-only surface temperature was the third highest on record at 0.80°C (1.44°F) above average. Only July 2016 and 2019 had a higher global ocean surface temperature.

                The Northern Hemisphere land and ocean surface temperature was the highest in the 141-year record at 1.18°C (2.12°F) above average. This was 0.08°C (0.14°F) higher than the now second warmest July of 2019.

                Warmer-than-average temperatures were present across much of Ontario, Canada, with temperatures ranging between 1.0°–4.0°C (1.8°–7.2°F) above average. Of note, the Moosonee Airport had a mean temperature of 19.2°C (66.6°F), which is 3.4°C (6.1°F) above average and the highest mean temperature recorded in the area.
                July 2020 was Spain's third warmest July in the nation's 56-year record. The national temperature of 26.0°C (78.8°F) was 2.0°C (3.6°F) above the 1981–2010 average. Only Julys of 2006 and 2015 were warmer. Eight of Spain's 10 warmest Julys on record have occurred since 2001. The nation's July 2020 maximum temperature was 2.3°C (4.1°F) above average and the second warmest July maximum temperature on record, behind July 2015.


                Year-to-date Temperature: January–July 2020

                The January–July global land and ocean surface temperature departure was 1.05°C (1.89°F) above average and the second warmest such period in the 141-year record. Only the year-to-date period of 2016 is warmer by 0.04°C (0.07°F). According to a statistical analysis done by NCEI scientist, the year 2020 is very likely to rank among the five warmest years on record.

                Temperature Percentiles

                During January–July 2020, temperature departures of +2.0°C (+3.6°F) or higher were observed across parts of the North Pacific Ocean and across parts of northern Europe and across much of the northern half of Asia. Record-warm year-to-date temperatures were present across a large portion of northern Asia and across parts of Europe, southern China, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, and the Atlantic, northern Indian, and Pacific oceans.

                © Copyright Original Source

                Last edited by shunyadragon; 08-19-2020, 07:38 AM.
                Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                go with the flow the river knows . . .

                Frank

                I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                Comment


                • #38
                  2020 is still in line to be #1 in history, and California is breaking all tragic records of heat and fires.

                  Source: https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/515342-weather-service-records-hottest-temperature-on-record-in-la-county



                  Weather service records hottest temperature on record in LA County
                  BY ARIS FOLLEY - 09/06/20 08:34 PM EDT

                  The National Weather Service (NWS) said Los Angeles County saw its highest temperature on official record Sunday after a high of 121 degrees Fahrenheit was recorded in the San Fernando Valley earlier in the day.

                  The federal agency said the temperature was recorded around noon in Woodland Hills at Pierce College, which runs one of the country’s oldest cooperative weather stations.

                  The temperature, the agency said, was two degrees higher than the previous all-time high recorded at the site more than a decade ago.

                  While the agency noted online that there are “unofficial backyard weather stations” that have recorded past highs at 122 degrees Fahrenheit around Woodland Hills, it said the temperature recorded on Sunday is the highest taken down at an official recording station in the county.

                  Wildfires have burned record 2 million acres in California this year

                  “This is also the highest temperature ever observed at an official recording station in Los Angeles County, or in the Los Angeles County warning area which includes San Luis Obispo County, Santa Barbara County, Ventura County and Los Angeles County,” the service said in a report later on Sunday.

                  “The temperature at Woodland Hills may yet go up additionally, and many other records around the region will be broken today,” the agency also said in the report.

                  The report comes weeks after Death Valley was said to have recorded its highest temperature in over a century after the NWS Prediction Center said Furnace Creek hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit. The high came as the region was experiencing a heat wave at the time.

                  © Copyright Original Source

                  Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                  Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                  But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                  go with the flow the river knows . . .

                  Frank

                  I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
                    2020 is still in line to be #1 in history, and California is breaking all tragic records of heat and fires.

                    Source: https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/515342-weather-service-records-hottest-temperature-on-record-in-la-county



                    Weather service records hottest temperature on record in LA County
                    BY ARIS FOLLEY - 09/06/20 08:34 PM EDT

                    The National Weather Service (NWS) said Los Angeles County saw its highest temperature on official record Sunday after a high of 121 degrees Fahrenheit was recorded in the San Fernando Valley earlier in the day.

                    The federal agency said the temperature was recorded around noon in Woodland Hills at Pierce College, which runs one of the country’s oldest cooperative weather stations.

                    The temperature, the agency said, was two degrees higher than the previous all-time high recorded at the site more than a decade ago.

                    While the agency noted online that there are “unofficial backyard weather stations” that have recorded past highs at 122 degrees Fahrenheit around Woodland Hills, it said the temperature recorded on Sunday is the highest taken down at an official recording station in the county.

                    Wildfires have burned record 2 million acres in California this year

                    “This is also the highest temperature ever observed at an official recording station in Los Angeles County, or in the Los Angeles County warning area which includes San Luis Obispo County, Santa Barbara County, Ventura County and Los Angeles County,” the service said in a report later on Sunday.

                    “The temperature at Woodland Hills may yet go up additionally, and many other records around the region will be broken today,” the agency also said in the report.

                    The report comes weeks after Death Valley was said to have recorded its highest temperature in over a century after the NWS Prediction Center said Furnace Creek hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit. The high came as the region was experiencing a heat wave at the time.

                    © Copyright Original Source

                    Two million acres burned and still burning, likely a new record.
                    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                    go with the flow the river knows . . .

                    Frank

                    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Esther View Post
                      I saw an expedition to western Alaska I think it was. What a huge undertaking. All to drill down the ice to take the temperature of the water beneath it. I was wanting to route for the people going through such extreme conditions, but just couldn't. To me it was all so pointless.

                      No matter what humans do or don't do, there is no way imo that it can ever stop global warming/climate change. We can all do something as individuals and as communities and countries for the environment, but nothing we do or do not do will help or hinder climate change as a whole. As if we can somehow stop earthquakes, wildfires, tornadoes, flooding etc etc.

                      Worshipping at the shrine of climate change is becoming the new religion.
                      imo caddies no weight in science nor reality.

                      Trump and Climate Change pulls a Schultz as usual, "We know nothing," combined with fuzzy vague 'arguing from ignorance,' and 'passing the buck.' Trump as with FOX News they ignore the that the Carbon Dioxide content of the atmosphere has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution in proportional to the temperature increase and the increase in droughts around the world between the arid regions and the mesic regions. Much of the Western United States is changing from a mesi region to an arid region with significant rise in temperatures and drop in rainfall.

                      Source: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-western-wildfires-science-climate-change/




                      Trump says "I don't think science knows" about climate

                      President Trump landed in California Monday framed by a smoky sky. He made a rare West Coast swing as wildfires ravage California, Oregon and Washington, and has already approved emergency declarations for the states.


                      In California, the president questioned climate change, and blamed the fires on poor forest management even though many forests in California are federally managed.

                      California National Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot disagreed that the rapidly spreading wildfires could entirely be blamed on forest management. He told Mr. Trump, "We want to work with you to really recognize the changing climate, and what it means to our forests." Crowfoot warned, "If we ignore that science, and sort of put our head in the sand, and think it's all about vegetation management, we're not going to succeed together protecting Californians."

                      The president claimed the climate would "start getting cooler."

                      "I wish science agreed with you," Crowfoot replied.

                      "I don't think science knows," the president responded.

                      Mr. Trump said exploding trees, caused by dryness and poor management, are the cause of the fires.

                      "When trees fall down after a short period of time, about 18 months, they become very dry," the president said. "They become really like a matchstick ... you know, there's no more water pouring through and they become very, very — they just explode. They can explode."

                      The fires have killed at least 35 from California to Washington state, and hundreds of thousands have been forced to evacuate. The smoke has destroyed the air quality up and down the West Coast, yielding the eerie orange images of San Francisco last week. Together, the dozens of fires have burned more than 3 million acres.

                      The president has long denied the impact of man-made influence on climate change. Asked if California had a climate change problem, Mr. Trump responded, "You'll have to answer your governor that question. I don't want to step on his toes."

                      © Copyright Original Source

                      Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                      Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                      But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                      go with the flow the river knows . . .

                      Frank

                      I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Source: https://phys.org/news/2020-10-great-barrier-reef-lost-corals.html



                        The Great Barrier Reef has lost half its corals


                        by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies


                        The Great Barrier Reef has lost half its corals in the past three decades. As more complex coral structure is lost, so too are the habitats for fish. Credit: Andreas Dietzel.
                        A new study of the Great Barrier Reef shows populations of its small, medium and large corals have all declined in the past three decades.

                        Lead author Dr. Andy Dietzel, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoralCoE), says while there are numerous studies over centuries on the changes in the structure of populations of humans—or, in the natural world, trees—there still isn't the equivalent information on the changes in coral populations.

                        "We measured changes in colony sizes because population studies are important for understanding demography and the corals' capacity to breed," Dr. Dietzel said.

                        He and his co-authors assessed coral communities and their colony size along the length of the Great Barrier Reef between 1995 and 2017. Their results show a depletion of coral populations.

                        "We found the number of small, medium and large corals on the Great Barrier Reef has declined by more than 50 percent since the 1990s," said co-author Professor Terry Hughes, also from CoralCoE.

                        "The decline occurred in both shallow and deeper water, and across virtually all species—but especially in branching and table-shaped corals. These were the worst affected by record-breaking temperatures that triggered mass bleaching in 2016 and 2017," Prof Hughes said.

                        The branching and table-shaped corals provide the structures important for reef inhabitants such as fish. The loss of these corals means a loss of habitat, which in turn diminishes fish abundance and the productivity of coral reef fisheries.

                        Dr. Dietzel says one of the major implications of coral size is its effect on survival and breeding.

                        "A vibrant coral population has millions of small, baby corals, as well as many large ones— the big mamas who produce most of the larvae," he said.

                        "Our results show the ability of the Great Barrier Reef to recover—its resilience—is compromised compared to the past, because there are fewer babies, and fewer large breeding adults."

                        The authors of the study say better data on the demographic trends of corals is urgently needed.

                        "If we want to understand how coral populations are changing and whether or not they can recover between disturbances, we need more detailed demographic data: on recruitment, on reproduction and on colony size structure," Dr. Dietzel said.

                        "We used to think the Great Barrier Reef is protected by its sheer size—but our results show that even the world's largest and relatively well-protected reef system is increasingly compromised and in decline," Prof Hughes said.

                        Climate change is driving an increase in the frequency of reef disturbances such as marine heatwaves. The study records steeper deteriorations of coral colonies in the Northern and Central Great Barrier Reef after the mass coral bleaching events in 2016 and 2017. And the southern part of the reef was also exposed to record-breaking temperatures in early 2020.

                        "There is no time to lose—we must sharply decrease greenhouse gas emissions ASAP," the authors conclude.

                        © Copyright Original Source

                        .


                        Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                        Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                        But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                        go with the flow the river knows . . .

                        Frank

                        I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Oh. Is it already time to move from the covid myth back to the climate warming myth? I thought we would have several more months before that happened.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by mikewhitney View Post
                            Oh. Is it already time to move from the covid myth back to the climate warming myth? I thought we would have several more months before that happened.
                            It is obvious that you are deep into conspiracy mythology, and anti-science.

                            Nothing changed. We we have global warming as we have for centuries since the industrial revolution as CO2 content in the atmosphere has increased. The CO2 content in the atmosphere is now higher than ever recorded in recent geologic history. The evidence has determined the rate of global warming is accelerating.
                            Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                            Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                            But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                            go with the flow the river knows . . .

                            Frank

                            I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post

                              It is obvious that you are deep into conspiracy mythology, and anti-science.

                              Nothing changed. We we have global warming as we have for centuries since the industrial revolution as CO2 content in the atmosphere has increased. The CO2 content in the atmosphere is now higher than ever recorded in recent geologic history. The evidence has determined the rate of global warming is accelerating.
                              Is that right? You find that CO2 is a pollutant when it is what plants thrive upon? You have forgotten the most basic science. Get a life. Produce life. Produce CO2

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by mikewhitney View Post

                                Is that right? You find that CO2 is a pollutant when it is what plants thrive upon? You have forgotten the most basic science. Get a life. Produce life. Produce CO2
                                Too much CO2 also insulates the atmosphere and prevents heat from escaping, basic science = global warming.
                                Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
                                Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
                                But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

                                go with the flow the river knows . . .

                                Frank

                                I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

                                Comment

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