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Remains of gigantic flying reptiles found in Argentina

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  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by tabibito View Post

    Near as I can tell, birds (for the most part) don't get as much advantage from a broad 3D field as they do from their most common 320 degree field of sight. If anything of interest shows, they can turn their heads to isolate it properly for 3D viewing, and usually tracking is done by turning the head to keep the object in centre field anyway. It doesn't seem that dinosaurs would be disadvantaged overly by eyes on the sides.
    I'd hate to think how much extra processing power needs to be devoted to keeping all the input properly sorted though,
    My objection is how something depicted above (assuming it to be a predator) would evolve. Small eyes, placement more for optimal peripheral vision, is not something I would expect from this large of a predator. Perhaps if it was slow and spent most of its time clomping around on the ground scavenging, then it needed to keep an eye out for fast predators. Maybe.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Teallaura View Post
    Still looks like a giant chicken with overly long wings. Maybe Tyrannosaurus rex was actually a chicken farmer...


    On a slightly more serious note, that graphic in the OP looks like a chicken skull - yes, really. (look it up - this computer hates downloading anything).

    I are confuzelled - the velociraptors have feathers but the pterosaurs have bat wings and bird skulls?
    There are a few differences, of course, as well as the wing membrane being structurally very different than that of a bat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by Teallaura View Post
    Still looks like a giant chicken with overly long wings. Maybe Tyrannosaurus rex was actually a chicken farmer...


    On a slightly more serious note, that graphic in the OP looks like a chicken skull - yes, really. (look it up - this computer hates downloading anything).

    I are confuzelled - the velociraptors have feathers but the pterosaurs have bat wings and bird skulls?
    Chicken eyes, however, are substantial in relation to its head.

    Leave a comment:


  • Teallaura
    replied
    Originally posted by tabibito View Post

    Near as I can tell, birds (for the most part) don't get as much advantage from a broad 3D field as they do from their most common 320 degree field of sight. If anything of interest shows, they can turn their heads to isolate it properly for 3D viewing, and usually tracking is done by turning the head to keep the object in centre field anyway. It doesn't seem that dinosaurs would be disadvantaged overly by eyes on the sides.
    I'd hate to think how much extra processing power needs to be devoted to keeping all the input properly sorted though,
    Well, if they aren't overly social, they'd have room left over from the communications side. That and being a glider lessens the 'figuring out how to stay airborn' part.

    Leave a comment:


  • Teallaura
    replied
    Still looks like a giant chicken with overly long wings. Maybe Tyrannosaurus rex was actually a chicken farmer...


    On a slightly more serious note, that graphic in the OP looks like a chicken skull - yes, really. (look it up - this computer hates downloading anything).

    I are confuzelled - the velociraptors have feathers but the pterosaurs have bat wings and bird skulls?

    Leave a comment:


  • tabibito
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post
    I found this tidbit, but it really doesn't answer its own question (unless it's in the video, which I can't access right now)

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/july...head-1.4744856

    Why do predatory dinosaurs have eyes on the sides of their head?

    This week's question comes to us from Graham Richard from Haida Gwaii, who asks the following:

    Eye orientation can reveal a lot about the niche terrestrial vertebrates occupy. Eyes of predators like mountain lions and pine martens have forward-facing eyes, whereas herbivores like Sitka deer or chipmunks tend to have eyes that are oriented temporally. This provides predators with greater depth-perception for pouncing on food, and gives prey a wider view of the landscape to survey the many dangers that may lurk just beyond their view.

    Richard wants to know why predatory dinosaurs appear to have eyes on the sides of their head?

    Franç​ois Therrien, the Curator of Dinosaur Palaeoecology at The Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta, says that most meat-eating dinosaurs known as theropods, had laterally positioned eyes, but not all of them. Having eyes on the sides of their heads resulted in a limited amount of depth perception, similar to pigeons and crocodiles today. This was not ideal for locating prey. But theropods, including tyranosaurs such as the famous T-rex, had forward-facing eyes. This gave them a high degree of binocular field of view. This means that tyrannosaurs would have had excellent depth perception to estimate the distance to prey and the timing of their attack. Their vision was similar to today's falcon. It also means that T-rex would have been able to detect prey even if it stood still against the background. So Jurassic Park got it wrong! Smaller theropods, like Velociraptor and Troodon, had even better depth perception than T-rex. Their vision was similar to that of modern owls.
    Near as I can tell, birds (for the most part) don't get as much advantage from a broad 3D field as they do from their most common 320 degree field of sight. If anything of interest shows, they can turn their heads to isolate it properly for 3D viewing, and usually tracking is done by turning the head to keep the object in centre field anyway. It doesn't seem that dinosaurs would be disadvantaged overly by eyes on the sides.
    I'd hate to think how much extra processing power needs to be devoted to keeping all the input properly sorted though,

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post

    I think they plagiarized you.
    I'm sure they wrote it before yesterday.

    It's just that scene is a natural reference in any discussion about dinosaur -- particularly carnivores -- vision.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Looks like confirmation of my previous post
    I think they plagiarized you.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post
    I found this tidbit, but it really doesn't answer its own question (unless it's in the video, which I can't access right now)

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/july...head-1.4744856

    Why do predatory dinosaurs have eyes on the sides of their head?

    This week's question comes to us from Graham Richard from Haida Gwaii, who asks the following:

    Eye orientation can reveal a lot about the niche terrestrial vertebrates occupy. Eyes of predators like mountain lions and pine martens have forward-facing eyes, whereas herbivores like Sitka deer or chipmunks tend to have eyes that are oriented temporally. This provides predators with greater depth-perception for pouncing on food, and gives prey a wider view of the landscape to survey the many dangers that may lurk just beyond their view.

    Richard wants to know why predatory dinosaurs appear to have eyes on the sides of their head?

    Franç​ois Therrien, the Curator of Dinosaur Palaeoecology at The Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta, says that most meat-eating dinosaurs known as theropods, had laterally positioned eyes, but not all of them. Having eyes on the sides of their heads resulted in a limited amount of depth perception, similar to pigeons and crocodiles today. This was not ideal for locating prey. But theropods, including tyranosaurs such as the famous T-rex, had forward-facing eyes. This gave them a high degree of binocular field of view. This means that tyrannosaurs would have had excellent depth perception to estimate the distance to prey and the timing of their attack. Their vision was similar to today's falcon. It also means that T-rex would have been able to detect prey even if it stood still against the background. So Jurassic Park got it wrong! Smaller theropods, like Velociraptor and Troodon, had even better depth perception than T-rex. Their vision was similar to that of modern owls.
    Looks like confirmation of my previous post

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronson
    replied
    I found this tidbit, but it really doesn't answer its own question (unless it's in the video, which I can't access right now)

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/july...head-1.4744856

    Why do predatory dinosaurs have eyes on the sides of their head?

    This week's question comes to us from Graham Richard from Haida Gwaii, who asks the following:

    Eye orientation can reveal a lot about the niche terrestrial vertebrates occupy. Eyes of predators like mountain lions and pine martens have forward-facing eyes, whereas herbivores like Sitka deer or chipmunks tend to have eyes that are oriented temporally. This provides predators with greater depth-perception for pouncing on food, and gives prey a wider view of the landscape to survey the many dangers that may lurk just beyond their view.

    Richard wants to know why predatory dinosaurs appear to have eyes on the sides of their head?

    Franç​ois Therrien, the Curator of Dinosaur Palaeoecology at The Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta, says that most meat-eating dinosaurs known as theropods, had laterally positioned eyes, but not all of them. Having eyes on the sides of their heads resulted in a limited amount of depth perception, similar to pigeons and crocodiles today. This was not ideal for locating prey. But theropods, including tyranosaurs such as the famous T-rex, had forward-facing eyes. This gave them a high degree of binocular field of view. This means that tyrannosaurs would have had excellent depth perception to estimate the distance to prey and the timing of their attack. Their vision was similar to today's falcon. It also means that T-rex would have been able to detect prey even if it stood still against the background. So Jurassic Park got it wrong! Smaller theropods, like Velociraptor and Troodon, had even better depth perception than T-rex. Their vision was similar to that of modern owls.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by NorrinRadd View Post

    But the binocular vision part wouldn't be possible.
    Their depth perception is/was limited.

    Do you remember the scene in the original Jurassic Park where the scientist tells everyone to stand perfectly still so the T rex wouldn't see them? Bad advice that was apparently based on older information about the T-rex's vision. They were one that did have binocular vision -- although not as good as a Velociraptor -- and he would have seen you just fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorrinRadd
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Um, there are carnivorous dinosaurs -- and crocodiles as well -- that had/have laterally placed eyes.
    But the binocular vision part wouldn't be possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by NorrinRadd View Post

    Which, IIRC, is relatively more common in predators, and would not be possible with those side-mounted orbs (except in weird cases like chameleons).
    Um, there are carnivorous dinosaurs -- and crocodiles as well -- that had/have laterally placed eyes.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorrinRadd
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    FWIU, they had binocular vision.
    Which, IIRC, is relatively more common in predators, and would not be possible with those side-mounted orbs (except in weird cases like chameleons).

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronson View Post

    Here's my rendition on the eyes:

    dino3.jpg

    I would think that would be a bit closer. And if it was a predator, they would be set more forward facing.

    Maybe some more fossils will show up soon.
    FWIU, they had binocular vision.

    Leave a comment:

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