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Fluid dynamics theory of the behavior of sound in the universe

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  • Fluid dynamics theory of the behavior of sound in the universe

    New theories concerning the behavior of sound traveling through the universe gives support for the model of an infinite universe that unfolds more slowly from the early stages. There has always been a problem with 'time' in the early history of a big bang forming from a singularity. This may resolve this problem.

    Our universe may behave like chocolate syrup and whipped cream on an ice cream sundae. bon appetite

    Originally posted by http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/big-bang-secrets-swirling-in-a-fluid-universe/

    To a sound wave, the cosmos has the consistency of chocolate syrup.

    That’s one discovery that scientists investigating the Big Bang have made using a new approach that treats the matter in the universe as a peculiar kind of fluid. They have calculated properties that characterize the universe’s behavior and evolution, including its viscosity, or resistance to deformation by sound waves and other disturbances.

    “Twenty pascal-seconds is the viscosity of the universe,” said Leonardo Senatore, an assistant professor of physics at Stanford University — just as it is for the ice cream topping.

    The viscosity calculation could help cosmologists sleuth out the details of the Big Bang, and possibly someday identify its trigger, by enabling them to track the fluidlike flow of the cosmos back 13.8 billion years to its initial state.

    As other techniques for probing the Big Bang reach their limits of sensitivity, cosmologists are co-opting the fluid approach, called “effective field theory,” from particle physics and condensed matter physics, fields in which it has been used for decades. By modeling the matter swirling throughout space as a viscous fluid, the cosmologists say they can precisely calculate how the fluid has evolved under the force of gravity — and then rewind this cosmic evolution back to the beginning. “With this approach, you can really zoom in on the initial conditions of the universe and start asking more and more precise questions,” said Enrico Pajer, a postdoctoral research fellow at Princeton University with a recent paper on the technique that has been accepted by the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics.

    The more information that astronomers gather about the distribution of galaxies throughout space — known as the “large-scale structure” of the universe — the more accurate the fluid model becomes. And the data are pouring in. The sketchy scatter plot of several thousand nearby galaxies that existed in the 1980s has given way to a far richer map of millions of galaxies, and planned telescopes will soon push the count into the billions. Proponents believe that tuned with these data points, the fluid model may grow precise enough within 10 or 15 years to prove or refute a promising Big Bang theory called “slow-roll inflation” that says the universe ballooned into existence when an entity called an inflation field slowly slid from one state to another. “There has been a big community trying to do this type of calculation for a long time,” said Matias Zaldarriaga, a professor of cosmology at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. Further in the future, the researchers say, applying effective field theory to even bigger datasets could reveal properties of the inflation field, which would help physicists build a theory to explain it.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  • #2
    There are two approaches that physicists and cosmologists use to develop theories that are used in models. The first is large scale behavior and evidence, such as the pattern of the distribution of galaxies in the universe, and the above reference, which estimates the behavior of the universe during expansion by comparing it to estimating behaviors of material viscosity. The second is the increasing knowledge on the quantum scale of the basic particles, and dark matter and energy.
    Last edited by shunyadragon; 02-28-2014, 11:21 PM.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
      New theories concerning the behavior of sound traveling through the universe gives support for the model of an infinite universe that unfolds more slowly from the early stages. There has always been a problem with 'time' in the early history of a big bang forming from a singularity. This may resolve this problem.

      Our universe may behave like chocolate syrup and whipped cream on an ice cream sundae. bon appetite
      If the universe went "BANG" but no one was there to hear it, then did it explode?


      Erm, sorry for the poor joke shuny.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by rwatts View Post
        If the universe went "BANG" but no one was there to hear it, then did it explode?


        Erm, sorry for the poor joke shuny.
        Not likely, but there would be whipped cream and chocolate spattered everywhere muffling any Big Bang. The biggest eruption of Chocolate Cream Puff ever.
        Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
        Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
        But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

        go with the flow the river knows . . .

        Frank

        I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

        Comment

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