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Earliest evidence of Christianity found in Galilee village

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  • Earliest evidence of Christianity found in Galilee village

    Source: Inscription Offers Earliest Evidence of Christianity in Israel’s Jezreel Valley


    The fifth-century engraving, found repurposed in a Byzantine building’s wall, references "Christ born of Mary"

    In full, the Greek text reads, “Christ born of Mary. This work of the most God-fearing
    and pious bishop [Theodo]sius and the miserable Th[omas] was built from the foundation.”


    Archaeologists in the northern Israeli village of et-Taiyiba have unearthed a 1,500-year-old Greek inscription that includes the phrase "Christ born of Mary," according to a statement from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA).

    As Amanda Borschel-Dan reports for the Times of Israel, researchers led by Tzachi Lang and Kojan Haku uncovered the stone engraving while conducting salvage excavations ahead of construction of a road. The team found the partially destroyed inscription repurposed in the wall of an elaborately decorated Byzantine building. Its text faced inward and would not have been visible to visitors.

    Per the statement, the full text of the inscription reads, "Christ born of Mary. This work of the most God-fearing and pious bishop [Theodo]sius and the miserable Th[omas] was built from the foundation."

    The find represents the first evidence of the now-lost church’s existence, as well as the earliest evidence of Christianity’s presence in the Jezreel Valley region.

    "We did not know what to expect ahead of the work, but we knew that this was an area where archaeological remains had been found," IAA archaeologist Yardenna Alexandre tells the Jerusalem Post’s Rossella Tercatin. "When we came across the inscription, we knew we had a church."

    Built in the fifth century A.D., the church predated other houses of worship in the area by around a century. Researchers had previously discovered the ruins of a Crusader-period church and an ancient monastery in the area, but they hadn’t yet found a Byzantine-era church.

    Speaking with the Times, researcher Walid Atrash says, "The importance of the inscription is that until now we didn’t know for certain that there were churches from this period in this area."


    According to Ruth Schuster of Haaretz, the scholars suggest that Theodosius, the fifth-century archbishop of the ancient city of Beit She’an, established the church, which is near Mount Tabor, the supposed site of the transfiguration of Jesus—a biblical event said to have underscored Christ’s divinity. The find indicates that Theodosius was building churches in the area earlier than archaeologists had previously thought.

    Thomas, the "miserable" individual whose name appears in the text, is a more mysterious figure, though researcher Leah Di Segni tells Haaretz that he might have helped fund the church. While the “miserable” moniker may sound off-putting to modern ears, Di Segni points out that such humble self-assessments were typical of religious inscriptions at the time.

    In the statement, Di Segni notes that the phrase "Christ born of Mary" -- an invocation intended to protect worshippers from the "evil eye" -- often appears at the beginning of early Christian documents and engravings.

    "The inscription greets those who enter and blesses them," Di Segni explains. "It is therefore clear that the building is a church, and not a monastery: Churches greeted believers at their entrance, while monasteries tended not to do this."

    After the et-Taiyiba church’s heyday, the engraving was incorporated into the doorframe of an elaborately decorated two-room building. Outfitted with geometric mosaics, the structure was built by Christian or Jewish residents of Galilee during the Byzantine or early Islamic period.

    Prior to its repurposing, the stone block boasted a carved crucifix. As the Times reports, the cross was either intentionally destroyed or damaged in an earthquake. If the former was the case, says Atrash, the builder likely didn’t set out to commit an act of desecration. Instead, he tells Haaretz, "I think maybe the builder didn’t care about the inscription or the cross. They were just in the way."

    In the statement, Atrash adds, "This is the first evidence of the Byzantine church’s existence in the village of et-Taiyiba and it adds to other finds attesting to the activities of Christians who lived in the region."



    Source

    © Copyright Original Source






    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

  • #2
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since youíve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?Ē

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
      Source: Inscription Offers Earliest Evidence of Christianity in Israel’s Jezreel Valley


      The fifth-century engraving, found repurposed in a Byzantine building’s wall, references "Christ born of Mary"

      In full, the Greek text reads, “Christ born of Mary. This work of the most God-fearing
      and pious bishop [Theodo]sius and the miserable Th[omas] was built from the foundation.”


      Archaeologists in the northern Israeli village of et-Taiyiba have unearthed a 1,500-year-old Greek inscription that includes the phrase "Christ born of Mary," according to a statement from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA).

      As Amanda Borschel-Dan reports for the Times of Israel, researchers led by Tzachi Lang and Kojan Haku uncovered the stone engraving while conducting salvage excavations ahead of construction of a road. The team found the partially destroyed inscription repurposed in the wall of an elaborately decorated Byzantine building. Its text faced inward and would not have been visible to visitors.

      Per the statement, the full text of the inscription reads, "Christ born of Mary. This work of the most God-fearing and pious bishop [Theodo]sius and the miserable Th[omas] was built from the foundation."

      The find represents the first evidence of the now-lost church’s existence, as well as the earliest evidence of Christianity’s presence in the Jezreel Valley region.

      "We did not know what to expect ahead of the work, but we knew that this was an area where archaeological remains had been found," IAA archaeologist Yardenna Alexandre tells the Jerusalem Post’s Rossella Tercatin. "When we came across the inscription, we knew we had a church."

      Built in the fifth century A.D., the church predated other houses of worship in the area by around a century. Researchers had previously discovered the ruins of a Crusader-period church and an ancient monastery in the area, but they hadn’t yet found a Byzantine-era church.

      Speaking with the Times, researcher Walid Atrash says, "The importance of the inscription is that until now we didn’t know for certain that there were churches from this period in this area."


      According to Ruth Schuster of Haaretz, the scholars suggest that Theodosius, the fifth-century archbishop of the ancient city of Beit She’an, established the church, which is near Mount Tabor, the supposed site of the transfiguration of Jesus—a biblical event said to have underscored Christ’s divinity. The find indicates that Theodosius was building churches in the area earlier than archaeologists had previously thought.

      Thomas, the "miserable" individual whose name appears in the text, is a more mysterious figure, though researcher Leah Di Segni tells Haaretz that he might have helped fund the church. While the “miserable” moniker may sound off-putting to modern ears, Di Segni points out that such humble self-assessments were typical of religious inscriptions at the time.

      In the statement, Di Segni notes that the phrase "Christ born of Mary" -- an invocation intended to protect worshippers from the "evil eye" -- often appears at the beginning of early Christian documents and engravings.

      "The inscription greets those who enter and blesses them," Di Segni explains. "It is therefore clear that the building is a church, and not a monastery: Churches greeted believers at their entrance, while monasteries tended not to do this."

      After the et-Taiyiba church’s heyday, the engraving was incorporated into the doorframe of an elaborately decorated two-room building. Outfitted with geometric mosaics, the structure was built by Christian or Jewish residents of Galilee during the Byzantine or early Islamic period.

      Prior to its repurposing, the stone block boasted a carved crucifix. As the Times reports, the cross was either intentionally destroyed or damaged in an earthquake. If the former was the case, says Atrash, the builder likely didn’t set out to commit an act of desecration. Instead, he tells Haaretz, "I think maybe the builder didn’t care about the inscription or the cross. They were just in the way."

      In the statement, Atrash adds, "This is the first evidence of the Byzantine church’s existence in the village of et-Taiyiba and it adds to other finds attesting to the activities of Christians who lived in the region."



      Source

      © Copyright Original Source




      I am not sure where you got the idea that the fifth century is the "Earliest evidence of Christianity".
      "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
        I am not sure where you got the idea that the fifth century is the "Earliest evidence of Christianity".
        Maybe you should try looking at the title of the OP "Earliest evidence of Christianity found in Galilee village" or the title of the article "Earliest Evidence of Christianity in Israel’s Jezreel Valley." It's the earliest evidence for Christianity found in that region.

        I'm always still in trouble again

        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
          Maybe you should try looking at the title of the OP "Earliest evidence of Christianity found in Galilee village" or the title of the article "Earliest Evidence of Christianity in Israel’s Jezreel Valley." It's the earliest evidence for Christianity found in that region.


          Your thread title is an illustration of what Richard Lederer would describe as “Anguished English”, of which there are numerous and invariably hilarious examples. By misplacing the modifier your title has been rendered inaccurate and somewhat absurd; as it implies that a fifth century inscription found in a Galilean village is the earliest known evidence of Christianity, when it self-evidently is not.

          Another example of such confusion is: A decision has made for the accommodation of pigs in the US Department of Agriculture.

          Or [a personal favourite]: In 1095 Urban II called for a crusade in Clermont.

          We sometimes forget that what is very clear to us may be far from clear to anyone reading what we have written.
          "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post


            Your thread title is an illustration of what Richard Lederer would describe as “Anguished English”, of which there are numerous and invariably hilarious examples. By misplacing the modifier your title has been rendered inaccurate and somewhat absurd; as it implies that a fifth century inscription found in a Galilean village is the earliest known evidence of Christianity, when it self-evidently is not.

            Another example of such confusion is: A decision has made for the accommodation of pigs in the US Department of Agriculture.

            Or [a personal favourite]: In 1095 Urban II called for a crusade in Clermont.

            We sometimes forget that what is very clear to us may be far from clear to anyone reading what we have written.
            Please take your incessant nitpicking and caviling elsewhere

            I'm always still in trouble again

            "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
            "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
              Please take your incessant nitpicking and caviling elsewhere
              I offer you my advice again, and that is to carefully read through what you have written before you submit it!

              Unless of course you like making yourself an object of ridicule.
              "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

                I offer you my advice again, and that is to carefully read through what you have written before you submit it!

                Unless of course you like making yourself an object of ridicule.
                You've been asked to not post in this thread

                I'm always still in trouble again

                "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                  Please take your incessant nitpicking and caviling elsewhere
                  H_A - I believe this is Rogue asking you to leave the thread. You are entitled to one response after being asked to leave, and you've already done that.
                  Please don't reply any further.
                  "Neighbor, how long has it been since youíve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?Ē

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                    Maybe you should try looking at the title of the OP "Earliest evidence of Christianity found in Galilee village" or the title of the article "Earliest Evidence of Christianity in Israel’s Jezreel Valley." It's the earliest evidence for Christianity found in that region.
                    That's not an inuitive reading, though. I looked at the title and also thought it was saying it was the earliest evidence of Christianity at all, which didn't make much sense. It wasn't until your clarification that I understood what you meant.

                    Once you clarified it, it was fine; I just don't think you need to be so defensive about a phrasing that was legitimately confusing, and it would've been better to just admit you didn't phrase it that well and move on.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Terraceth View Post
                      That's not an inuitive reading, though. I looked at the title and also thought it was saying it was the earliest evidence of Christianity at all, which didn't make much sense. It wasn't until your clarification that I understood what you meant.

                      Once you clarified it, it was fine; I just don't think you need to be so defensive about a phrasing that was legitimately confusing, and it would've been better to just admit you didn't phrase it that well and move on.
                      It's more with being tired of dealing with a poster who has a history of looking very hard to find something to split hairs over and willing to continue on for pages about it with the tenacity of a bulldog

                      I'm always still in trouble again

                      "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                      "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                        It's more with being tired of dealing with a poster who has a history of looking very hard to find something to split hairs over and willing to continue on for pages about it with the tenacity of a bulldog
                        And, having asked her to leave the thread, discussions about her should..... I lives ya brudder.
                        "Neighbor, how long has it been since youíve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?Ē

                        Comment

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