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Jesus' childhood home discovered?

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  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Another piece on Dark's claim of having located Jesus' childhood home -- in Popular Mechanics of all places, which allows you to vote on it. Currently it is 51% for "Sure why not? He was a real guy, after all" and 49% "I doubt it."
    Figured I'd take a peek at the results so far. Currently 54% to 46%
    Last edited by rogue06; 12-18-2020, 12:33 PM. Reason: restored post after accidentally posting over it making post #49

    Leave a comment:


  • Cow Poke
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    I am not interested in your efforts.

    I asked you a question, namely, do you have a serious point to make with regard to this first century dwelling? All this nonsense you have posted links for is entirely irrelevant.
    Ya know, there's nothing terribly wrong with just posting something for civil discussion, without it needing to turn into some deep theological debate.

    Some things are good for just "hmmm, that's interesting". That's clearly what Rogue intended when posting this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    My aren't we dense today. What part of "it is part of my own effort to include more posts on theological matters or Christians and Christianity in general here at THEOLOGYweb" is so difficult to understand?
    I am not interested in your efforts.

    I asked you a question, namely, do you have a serious point to make with regard to this first century dwelling? All this nonsense you have posted links for is entirely irrelevant.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    And what does any of this signify? What relevance has C S Lewis have to an allegation concerning a first century dwelling being the possible home of Jesus of Nazareth? Did Ken Dark go through a wardrobe?
    My aren't we dense today. What part of "it is part of my own effort to include more posts on theological matters or Christians and Christianity in general here at THEOLOGYweb" is so difficult to understand? It wasn't a long post. Kind of hard to miss.

    Leave a comment:


  • shunyadragon
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    And what does any of this signify? What relevance has C S Lewis have to an allegation concerning a first century dwelling being the possible home of Jesus of Nazareth? Did Ken Dark go through a wardrobe?
    I wanted to add after reading the references carefully I could easily conclude that no this is not the home of Jesus. Only evidence is the general location and being dated to the time of Jesus.

    It is a rather extravagant 2-story house likely for a merchant class, or government official, which was able to survive the ravages of time. Jesus is described to be of very humble origins, which do not reflect such a large two story dwelling.

    Wishful thinking does not produce the home of Jesus.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Hunt
    replied
    Actually, for famous people in the Roman world, there are plenty of contemporary accounts.
    Jesus is more in the category of someone like a contemporary of his, Apollonius of Tyana, a wandering philosopher, who travelled over much of the Empire with his disciples, also visiting Ethiopia, Mesopotamia, and maybe even India. He was also believed to be born of a virgin, performed miracles, healed the sick, cast out demons, raised the dead, and was worshiped as divine. Much better known than Jesus for some centuries, he met with many famous people, including the Emperor Domitian, and lived into his eighties, when he was raised to heaven (reportedly). But wandering philosophers like him, or Jesus, tended not to get written about at the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Hardly a question that anyone would take as a serious one. As carping, yes. A serious question, no.

    But since you've at least feigned curiosity, it is part of my own effort to include more posts on theological matters or Christians and Christianity in general here at THEOLOGYweb. These include posts like

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...-walter-hooper

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e5#post1215026

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...80#post1214914

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e7#post1214311 (along with #201)

    My posts in this thread but primarily #5:
    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...d-the-big-rock

    And even, to a much less extent, including it in humor sections:
    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...79#post1214403


    As well as a few in sections that you aren't privy to.

    And what does any of this signify? What relevance has C S Lewis have to an allegation concerning a first century dwelling being the possible home of Jesus of Nazareth? Did Ken Dark go through a wardrobe?

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    I asked you a question, where is your answer? Or can't you find anything on Google?
    Hardly a question that anyone would take as a serious one. As carping, yes. A serious question, no.

    But since you've at least feigned curiosity, it is part of my own effort to include more posts on theological matters or Christians and Christianity in general here at THEOLOGYweb. These include posts like

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...-walter-hooper

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e5#post1215026

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...80#post1214914

    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e7#post1214311 (along with #201)

    My posts in this thread but primarily #5:
    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...d-the-big-rock

    And even, to a much less extent, including it in humor sections:
    https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...79#post1214403


    As well as a few in sections that you aren't privy to.


    Leave a comment:


  • Cow Poke
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    edit not quote
    How could you POSSIBLY DO THAT?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Nothing to see here folks. Just someone who obviously has a stick wedged firmly up her bum
    I asked you a question, where is your answer? Or can't you find anything on Google?

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    My my we have been a busy little bee trawling the net again, haven't we?

    Do you have a serious point to make? Or are you just out to impress your "base"?
    Nothing to see here folks. Just someone who obviously has a stick wedged firmly up her bum

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    Actually the apocryphal Acts of John, written around 180 A.D., assigned significance to a cave on the Mount of Olives, just outside ancient Jerusalem and the historian Eusebius Pamphili (a.k.a., Eusebius of Caesarea), wrote in his Historia ecclesiastica (or "Ecclesiastical History") between 312-324 A.D., that the Roman Emperor Hadrian (ruled from 117 to 138 A.D.) order the construction of a temple over the tomb -- just like he did, and for the same reasons, that he had temples built at or next to the Jewish temple at Jerusalem and the most important Samaritan shrine on Mount Gerizim (where they believe the prophet Joshua built a temple).

    AFAICT, that Hadrian ordered that a cave which contained a rock-cut tomb be filled in order to create a foundation for a temple dedicated to Jupiter during the construction of Aelia Capitolina is not really debated. The only disagreement seems to be whether this temple was one dedicated to Venus instead.

    Still, that doesn't prove that this was the place was where or Jesus was buried or that they are even the same tombs. But it does show that the tradition stretches back much further than Constantine the Great's mother Helena claiming to have discovered the tomb while in Jerusalem.
    My my we have been a busy little bee trawling the net again, haven't we?

    Do you have a serious point to make? Or are you just out to impress your "base"?

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    edit not quote

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    A little too convenient I suspect. The well built and attested first century dwelling has a tradition of being the home of Jesus [to wit the much later 4th century church] but that is as far as Dr Dark can really take his theory. Everything else he is proffering is pure speculation. It is like the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem which is allegedly supposed to be the site of the crucifixion and burial, based again on much later [4th century allegations]. A veritable industry developed from the fourth century producing relics of Jesus, the Holy Family and various saints.

    Of course the other possibility is that Dark was having a laugh, given the season that is fast approaching.
    Actually the apocryphal Acts of John, written around 180 A.D., assigned significance to a cave on the Mount of Olives, just outside ancient Jerusalem and the historian Eusebius Pamphili (a.k.a., Eusebius of Caesarea), wrote in his Historia ecclesiastica (or "Ecclesiastical History") between 312-324 A.D., that the Roman Emperor Hadrian (ruled from 117 to 138 A.D.) order the construction of a temple over the tomb -- just like he did, and for the same reasons, that he had temples built at or next to the Jewish temple at Jerusalem and the most important Samaritan shrine on Mount Gerizim (where they believe the prophet Joshua built a temple).

    AFAICT, that Hadrian ordered that a cave which contained a rock-cut tomb be filled in order to create a foundation for a temple dedicated to Jupiter during the construction of Aelia Capitolina is not really debated. The only disagreement seems to be whether this temple was one dedicated to Venus instead.

    Still, that doesn't prove that this was the place was where or Jesus was buried or that they are even the same tombs. But it does show that the tradition stretches back much further than Constantine the Great's mother Helena claiming to have discovered the tomb while in Jerusalem.

    Leave a comment:


  • shunyadragon
    replied
    Originally posted by lee_merrill View Post
    Neat! Some interesting evidence, indeed...

    Blessings,
    Lee
    Actually no evidence at present except for dating the house approximately to the time Jesus lived.

    Leave a comment:

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