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Amazing 8 mile long panarama Neolithic drawings over 12,000 years old.

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  • Amazing 8 mile long panarama Neolithic drawings over 12,000 years old.

    They found an 8 mile panarama drawing in the Amazon showing a range of Ice Age animals.

    Source: https://www.livescience.com/ice-age-rock-art-amazon.html



    Sprawling 8-mile-long 'canvas' of ice age beasts discovered hidden in Amazon rainforest


    By Laura Geggel - Associate Editor 8 hours ago

    Ice age people painted these animals 12,600 years ago.
    Thousands of images drawn during the last ice age were found in the Amazon Rainforest.
    (Image: © Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media)

    An 8-mile-long "canvas" filled with ice age drawings of mastodons, giant sloths and other extinct beasts has been discovered in the Amazon rainforest.

    The gorgeous art, drawn with ochre — a red pigment frequently used as paint in the ancient world — spans nearly 8 miles (13 kilometers) of rock on the hills above three rock shelters in the Colombian Amazon, a new study finds.

    "These really are incredible images, produced by the earliest people to live in western Amazonia," study co-researcher Mark Robinson, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter, who analyzed the rock art alongside Colombian scientists, said in a statement.

    Indigenous people likely started painting these images at the archaeological site of Serranía La Lindosa, on the northern edge of the Colombian Amazon, toward the end of the last ice age, about 12,600 to 11,800 years ago. During that time, "the Amazon was still transforming into the tropical forest we recognize today," Robinson said. Rising temperatures changed the Amazon from a patchwork landscape of savannas, thorny scrub and forest into today's leafy tropical rainforest.

    The thousands of ice age paintings include both handprints, geometric designs and a wide array of animals, from the "small" — such as deer, tapirs, alligators, bats, monkeys, turtles, serpents and porcupines — to the "large," including camelids, horses and three-toed hoofed mammals with trunks. Other figures depict humans, hunting scenes and images of people interacting with plants, trees and savannah creatures. And, although there is also ice age animal rock art in Central Brazil, the new findings are more detailed and shed light on what these now-extinct species looked like, the researchers said.

    "The paintings give a vivid and exciting glimpse into the lives of these communities," Robinson said. "It is unbelievable to us today to think they lived among, and hunted, giant herbivores, some which were the size of a small car."

    Many of South America's large animals went extinct at the end of the last ice age, likely through a combination of human hunting and climate change, the researchers said.
    Ice age people drew these figures, handprints and designs with red ochre. (Image credit: Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media)
    Excavations within the rock shelters revealed that these camps were some of the earliest human-occupied sites in the Amazon. The paintings and camps offer clues about these early hunter-gatherers' diets; for instance, bone and plant remains indicate that the menu included palm and tree fruits, piranhas, alligators, snakes, frogs, rodents such as paca and capybara, and armadillos, the researchers said.

    "These rock paintings are spectacular evidence of how humans reconstructed the land, and how they hunted, farmed and fished," study co-researcher José Iriarte, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter, said in the statement. "It is likely art was a powerful part of culture and a way for people to connect socially."

    The findings were published in April in the journal Quaternary International, and the University of Exeter released a statement today (Nov. 30) to coincide with a new TV documentary on the finding called "Jungle Mystery: Lost Kingdoms of the Amazon," which will air in the U.K. in December.

    Originally published on Live Science.

    © Copyright Original Source


    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  • #2
    Surprising that it could survive at all in a tropical rain forest but I guess some others like this have been found in Columbia and Panama.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
      Surprising that it could survive at all in a tropical rain forest but I guess some others like this have been found in Columbia and Panama.
      Red Ochre is very resistant to weathering. Yes, I have personally seen others in Costa Rica and Panama, but is beyond amazing by its shear size and composition.
      Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
      Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
      But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

      go with the flow the river knows . . .

      Frank

      I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here's another article about the find but they're saying that it isn't 8 miles long but 2.5 -- which is still pretty darn long: More than 2.5 miles of cliff paintings found hidden in the Amazon rainforest show ancient hunter-gatherers killing Ice Age creatures

        I'm always still in trouble again

        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

        Comment


        • #5
          What amazes me tremendously of this discovery is the hazards they had to go over to reach them. If not the hostile fauna in Amazonian Colombia, the paramilitary/criminal organizations that run amoc in those regions pose a great hazard in reaching those sites.
          https://www.infobae.com/america/amer...-del-amazonas/

          Seeing those very illustrations on those scales, absolutely jaw-dropping. Finding material cultural that is Pre-Muisca (The dominant peoples of that region prior to European contact) is fascinating!
          Ladino, Guatemalan, Hispanic, and Latin, but foremostly, Christian.
          As of the 1st of December, 2020, officially anointed as this:

          "Seinfeld had its Soup Nazi. Tweb has its Taco Nazi." - Rogue06 , https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e3#post1210559

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
            Here's another article about the find but they're saying that it isn't 8 miles long but 2.5 -- which is still pretty darn long: More than 2.5 miles of cliff paintings found hidden in the Amazon rainforest show ancient hunter-gatherers killing Ice Age creatures
            ~2.5 miles is equivalent to ~13 kilometers in the Spanish news article.
            Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
            Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
            But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

            go with the flow the river knows . . .

            Frank

            I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post

              ~2.5 miles is equivalent to ~13 kilometers in the Spanish news article.
              Actually, the link Rogue put is reporting 2.5 miles, which actually hits 4 kilometers, a definite different length. Perhaps Rogue's article had a different length, or they are referring strictly the surface areas covered by paint, who knows, it's still pretty darn long.
              Finally found an article that stated it's exact location. It is in Chiribiquete National Park. Turns out that place is LOADED with rock art from all kinds of eras (latest dated art was 15th century)! But this latest discovery is definitely the big kahuna of the rock art of Chiribiquete. Love the nickname "Sistine Chapel of the Amazons" it is been given.

              https://www.lavanguardia.com/cultura...channel-4.html
              Ladino, Guatemalan, Hispanic, and Latin, but foremostly, Christian.
              As of the 1st of December, 2020, officially anointed as this:

              "Seinfeld had its Soup Nazi. Tweb has its Taco Nazi." - Rogue06 , https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...e3#post1210559

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Andius View Post

                Actually, the link Rogue put is reporting 2.5 miles, which actually hits 4 kilometers, a definite different length. Perhaps Rogue's article had a different length, or they are referring strictly the surface areas covered by paint, who knows, it's still pretty darn long.
                Finally found an article that stated it's exact location. It is in Chiribiquete National Park. Turns out that place is LOADED with rock art from all kinds of eras (latest dated art was 15th century)! But this latest discovery is definitely the big kahuna of the rock art of Chiribiquete. Love the nickname "Sistine Chapel of the Amazons" it is been given.

                https://www.lavanguardia.com/cultura...channel-4.html
                Also called the "Sistine Chapel of the Ancients"

                It seems virtually every story I read says it's 8 miles but they are all pretty much quoting each other.

                I'm always still in trouble again

                "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by shunyadragon View Post
                  They found an 8 mile panarama drawing in the Amazon showing a range of Ice Age animals.

                  Source: https://www.livescience.com/ice-age-rock-art-amazon.html



                  Sprawling 8-mile-long 'canvas' of ice age beasts discovered hidden in Amazon rainforest


                  By Laura Geggel - Associate Editor 8 hours ago

                  Ice age people painted these animals 12,600 years ago.
                  Thousands of images drawn during the last ice age were found in the Amazon Rainforest.
                  (Image: © Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media)

                  An 8-mile-long "canvas" filled with ice age drawings of mastodons, giant sloths and other extinct beasts has been discovered in the Amazon rainforest.

                  The gorgeous art, drawn with ochre — a red pigment frequently used as paint in the ancient world — spans nearly 8 miles (13 kilometers) of rock on the hills above three rock shelters in the Colombian Amazon, a new study finds.

                  "These really are incredible images, produced by the earliest people to live in western Amazonia," study co-researcher Mark Robinson, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter, who analyzed the rock art alongside Colombian scientists, said in a statement.

                  Indigenous people likely started painting these images at the archaeological site of Serranía La Lindosa, on the northern edge of the Colombian Amazon, toward the end of the last ice age, about 12,600 to 11,800 years ago. During that time, "the Amazon was still transforming into the tropical forest we recognize today," Robinson said. Rising temperatures changed the Amazon from a patchwork landscape of savannas, thorny scrub and forest into today's leafy tropical rainforest.

                  The thousands of ice age paintings include both handprints, geometric designs and a wide array of animals, from the "small" — such as deer, tapirs, alligators, bats, monkeys, turtles, serpents and porcupines — to the "large," including camelids, horses and three-toed hoofed mammals with trunks. Other figures depict humans, hunting scenes and images of people interacting with plants, trees and savannah creatures. And, although there is also ice age animal rock art in Central Brazil, the new findings are more detailed and shed light on what these now-extinct species looked like, the researchers said.

                  "The paintings give a vivid and exciting glimpse into the lives of these communities," Robinson said. "It is unbelievable to us today to think they lived among, and hunted, giant herbivores, some which were the size of a small car."

                  Many of South America's large animals went extinct at the end of the last ice age, likely through a combination of human hunting and climate change, the researchers said.
                  Ice age people drew these figures, handprints and designs with red ochre. (Image credit: Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media)
                  Excavations within the rock shelters revealed that these camps were some of the earliest human-occupied sites in the Amazon. The paintings and camps offer clues about these early hunter-gatherers' diets; for instance, bone and plant remains indicate that the menu included palm and tree fruits, piranhas, alligators, snakes, frogs, rodents such as paca and capybara, and armadillos, the researchers said.

                  "These rock paintings are spectacular evidence of how humans reconstructed the land, and how they hunted, farmed and fished," study co-researcher José Iriarte, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter, said in the statement. "It is likely art was a powerful part of culture and a way for people to connect socially."

                  The findings were published in April in the journal Quaternary International, and the University of Exeter released a statement today (Nov. 30) to coincide with a new TV documentary on the finding called "Jungle Mystery: Lost Kingdoms of the Amazon," which will air in the U.K. in December.

                  Originally published on Live Science.

                  © Copyright Original Source

                  Certainly another important find and which gives information on the type of fauna and flora that these people knew. However, while a fascinating discovery, it is still comparatively recent when considered against the approximated datings of other human creative depictions found in various parts of the world.

                  Iriarte's comment "It is likely art was a powerful part of culture and a way for people to connect socially" is somewhat speculative. We have no idea what motives lay behind such depictions, nor do we know if the creators considered what they depicted to be "art".

                  I must admit that the frequent hand-prints found across many such ancient sites never cease to be profoundly affecting.
                  "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

                    Certainly another important find and which gives information on the type of fauna and flora that these people knew. However, while a fascinating discovery, it is still comparatively recent when considered against the approximated datings of other human creative depictions found in various parts of the world.

                    Iriarte's comment "It is likely art was a powerful part of culture and a way for people to connect socially" is somewhat speculative. We have no idea what motives lay behind such depictions, nor do we know if the creators considered what they depicted to be "art".

                    I must admit that the frequent hand-prints found across many such ancient sites never cease to be profoundly affecting.
                    I think that he ease at making such handprint silhouettes[1] might have a lot to do with their near universal application



                    1. Simply put some dry pigment (powder) in a tube and blow it onto the hand as it's up against the rock. In fact you can even put the powder directly into the front of the mouth, just behind the lips, and do it as well.

                    I'm always still in trouble again

                    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                      I think that he ease at making such handprint silhouettes[1] might have a lot to do with their near universal application



                      1. Simply put some dry pigment (powder) in a tube and blow it onto the hand as it's up against the rock. In fact you can even put the powder directly into the front of the mouth, just behind the lips, and do it as well.
                      The implication of my comment appears to have missed you completely.

                      However, thank you for stating the obvious and what most us already knew.
                      "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

                        The implication of my comment appears to have missed you completely.

                        However, thank you for stating the obvious and what most us already knew.
                        The only thing that rivals your arrogance is your acidic demeanor.

                        I'm always still in trouble again

                        "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
                        "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
                          The only thing that rivals your arrogance is your acidic demeanor.
                          Poseurs set themselves up for such remarks.
                          "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful" Attrib. Seneca 4 BCE - 65 CE

                          Comment

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