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Study Room Guidelines

Ok it isn't so quiet in here but our resident librarian will ensure that there is good discussion on literature, prose, poetry, etc. You may also post sermons, notes, and the like as long as it is not copyrighted material and within reason of the post length regulation.

We encourage you to take a lose look at the threads and offer honest and useful input. This forum is a place where we discuss literature of any media, as well as personal creations by some of our own wordsmiths. Debate is encouraged, but we often find ourselves relaxing here.

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    And he said, O my Lord, send, I pray thee, by the hand of him whom thou wilt send
    Exod. 4:13

    It was a very grudging assent. It was as much as to say, “Since Thou art determined to send me and I must undertake the mission, then let it be so; but I would that it might have been another, and I go because I am compelled.” So often do we shrink back from the sacrifice or obligation to which God calls us, that we think we are going to our doom. We seek every reason for evading the divine will, little realizing that He is forcing us out from our quiet homes into a career which includes, among other things, the song of victory on the banks of the Red Sea; the two lonely sojourns for forty days in converse with God; the shining face; the vision of glory; the burial by the hand of Michael; and the supreme honor of standing beside the Lord on the Transfiguration mountain.

    F. B. Meyer


    Samuel G. Hardman and Dwight Lyman Moody, Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    "Whoever drinks of the water that I give him, shall never thirst."

    "To know that shall means shall, that never means never and that thirst means any unsatisfied need, may be one of the greatest revelations God ever made to our souls." (Hudson Taylor)

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    Tues., September 18th. I gave the sacrament to a dying woman, who triumphed over death, disarmed of his sting. I preached to above two thousand over against the school-house, and pressed them to come to Christ weary and heavy-laden. I finished Rom. 8 at Weaver’s-hall, which is always crowded within and without. Mr. Rutter attempted to raise a disturbance; but none regarded him. Mrs. Labu followed me to M. Grevil’s, with a young gentlewoman, to whom the word had come with power. Upon Mr. Oakley’s speaking to her the first serious word she had ever heard, she asked if the gentleman was not crazy. But now in the same hour God slew and revived her. She felt and made confession of her faith, being full of astonishment and love.

    Charles Wesley, The Journal of the Rev. Charles Wesley

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    “To say that something is wrong because… it is forbidden by God, is…. perfectly understandable to anyone who believes in a law-giving God. But to say that something is wrong… even though no God exists to forbid it, is not understandable… The concept of moral obligation [is] unintelligible apart from the idea of God. The words remain but their meaning is gone.” - Richard Taylor

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    “The most effective apologist is not one who has the greatest academic prowess alone, but the one who has excellent intellectual preparation and reflects Christ's love in every way.” ― Francis J. Beckwith, To Everyone an Answer: A Case for the Christian Worldview

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    When you’re going through hard times and God seems distant, apologetics can help you to remember that our faith is not based on emotions, but on the truth, and therefore you must hold on to it.”
    ― William Lane Craig, On Guard: Defending Your Faith with Reason and Precision

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    "Oh! look not after great things: small breathings, small desires after the Lord, if true and pure, are sweet beginnings of life. You must become a child, you must lose your own will quite by degrees. You must wait for life to be measured out by the Father, and be content with what proportion, and at what time, He shall please to measure. Oh! be little, be little, and then you will be content with little; and if you feel now and then a check or a secret smiting, in that is the Father's love; be not over wise, nor over eager in your own willing, running, and desiring, and by degrees come to the knowledge of your Guide, who will lead you step by step in the path of life, and teach you to follow, and in His own season powerfully judge that which cannot nor will not follow. Be still, and wait for light and strength." (Isaac Penington)

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    "Let your heart and desires continually hold converse with God, in heartfelt simplicity. Reflect on Him with feelings of love and reverence, and often offer up your heart, with all that you have and are, to Him, in spirit and in truth, as cordially and sincerely as possible. If through weakness or unfaithfulness you forsake this exercise, which is so incredibly helpful and beautiful, all you have to do is, meekly and heartily to begin again; and do not be weary of it, although in the beginning you may not find any great advantage from it, or make any rapid progress in it. It is not true that such a mode of life is hard; it is easy and pleasant to the spirit, and becomes in due time like a heaven upon earth. A little patience and courage alone are needed." (Gerhard TerSteegen)

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  • Cow Poke
    replied
    “Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”
    -Carl Bard

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  • Cow Poke
    replied
    The frisbee appeared to be getting bigger and bigger. Then it hit me.

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  • One Bad Pig
    replied
    "Human arrogance is nothing, nor is the self-conceit of our hearts. For arrogance anchors itself in the wind and our self-conceit drifts in the air like fleeting smoke. What, really, is arrogance except the counterfeit image of puffed-up thought, the momentary crashing of a wave? It is a bubble, ready to burst, floating for a little while on the surface of the water; suddenly it breaks, and comes to nothing. Tell me, what profit, really, do we gain from it? It cannot add an inch to our height, and yet it makes us fly above the heavens. It cannot add a penny to our possessions, and yet it makes us conceited like rulers and kings. It doesn't provide us with extravagant foods or luxurious clothing, and yet it inflates our thoughts the way luxury bloats the bodies of the self-indulgent. It doesn't add one day to our lives, and yet like the immortals we keep our brows raised sky-high! Earth and dust, we forget the stench of the tomb and fly away on the air. Arrogance is like the swelling of the sea which sometimes is calm and smooth, while at other times its every drop rises and crests; yet one wave after another crashes onto the shore and vanishes. In the same way arrogance also brings down the mind it holds captive through self-important thoughts and then dashes it against the gates of Hell." - St. George the Chozebite

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    “smugness is half the fun of being a liberal (the other half being the tearing down of everything one’s ancestors, and one’s betters generally, worked so hard to build).”
    ― Edward Feser, The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism, pg. 216

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the gift which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knock. Such grace is costly because it calls us to follow, and it is grace because it calls us to follow Jesus Christ. It is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life. It is costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it justifies the sinner.-Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Cheap Grace, pg.45

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  • lee_merrill
    replied
    Mon., September 10th. At the Hall, while I was expounding Isai. 4, a man perceived his filth purged away by the Spirit of judgment and burning. Sarah Norton, a Presbyterian, followed me home under strong convictions. We prayed and trembled before the face of God. She is not far from the kingdom of heaven. Two simple souls, Mary Fry and Jane Clansy, now informed me, that God filled them on Friday evening with love and joy unspeakable. They expressed so much of it, and have been so tempted since, that I could not doubt of their being accepted. I conversed and prayed with M. Hooper. I have a good hope that the Sun of righteousness is risen upon her, with healing in his wings.

    I preached in the brick-yard, where I think there could not be less than four thousand. It rained hard, yet none stirred. I spoke with great freedom and power. A woman cried out, and dropped down. I spoke to her at M. Norman’s, and found she had sunk under the weight of sin.

    At Gloucester-lane I discoursed two hours on John 3. A notorious drunkard gave glory to God, declaring he had found mercy last night, through faith in Jesus Christ. This stirred the Pharisee in a woman’s soul, and she cried out against him most vehemently. I took and turned her inside out, and showed her her spirit in those who murmured at Christ for receiving sinners. A woman of a broken spirit testified she had found redemption through his blood, when I preached last at Baptist-Mills. We daily discover more and more who are begotten again by the word of God’s power, or awakened to a sense of sin, or edified in the faith.


    Charles Wesley, The Journal of the Rev. Charles Wesley, ed. Thomas Jackson, vol. 1 (London: John Mason, 1849), 171.

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  • ReformedApologist
    replied
    Many secularists like to assimilate Religion to Superstition, when in fact Superstition is not Religion per se, but at most the corruption of True Religion, just as tyranny is not government per se but merely the corruption of government, just as wage labor is comparable to slavery only very remotely and only under the worst circumstances, and just as prostitution is not even remotely comparable to marriage.- Edward Feser The Last Superstition A Refutation Of The New Atheism pg. 14.

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