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Jerusalem Syndrome

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  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by Lariliss View Post
    I have become acquainted with the Jerusalem syndrome from Neil Gaiman’s ‘Jerusalem’ story.

    First of all it has a thoughtful meaning - bringing Jerusalem home green Britain.


    We have hundreds of syndromes which are not investigated, idiopathic, not even recognized.

    Most of the day we are daydreaming.


    Jerusalem syndrome is meaningful as our history, our intentions and dreaming.


    Could it have a part of a human brain digesting deeds and history and learning from mistakes? Doubtful, but not hopeless.
    I think I will accept the views of the psychiatrists but thank you for your comments.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by Lariliss View Post
    I have become acquainted with the Jerusalem syndrome from Neil Gaiman’s ‘Jerusalem’ story.

    First of all it has a thoughtful meaning - bringing Jerusalem home green Britain.


    We have hundreds of syndromes which are not investigated, idiopathic, not even recognized.

    Most of the day we are daydreaming.


    Jerusalem syndrome is meaningful as our history, our intentions and dreaming.


    Could it have a part of a human brain digesting deeds and history and learning from mistakes? Doubtful, but not hopeless.
    Um, welcome to Tweb.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lariliss
    replied
    I have become acquainted with the Jerusalem syndrome from Neil Gaiman’s ‘Jerusalem’ story.

    First of all it has a thoughtful meaning - bringing Jerusalem home green Britain.


    We have hundreds of syndromes which are not investigated, idiopathic, not even recognized.

    Most of the day we are daydreaming.


    Jerusalem syndrome is meaningful as our history, our intentions and dreaming.


    Could it have a part of a human brain digesting deeds and history and learning from mistakes? Doubtful, but not hopeless.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    I worked with a JW for over two years. Really big guy. A gentle giant. Ended up getting fired for sleeping on the job though.

    Then one day a mutual friend called and told me to look at the front page of the local paper. I found it online and lo and behold there was a picture of the guy. He had been arrested for attempted rape and police said he was a suspect in several other rapes in the area.

    I just looked him up and he got three life sentences Apparently one of his victims was a minor.

    It just goes to show that sometimes you just can't tell.
    What was his name?

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    And that ends Thought for the Day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    I worked with a JW for over two years. Really big guy. A gentle giant. Ended up getting fired for sleeping on the job though.

    Then one day a mutual friend called and told me to look at the front page of the local paper. I found it online and lo and behold there was a picture of the guy. He had been arrested for attempted rape and police said he was a suspect in several other rapes in the area.

    I just looked him up and he got three life sentences Apparently one of his victims was a minor.

    It just goes to show that sometimes you just can't tell.
    And that ends Thought for the Day.

    Leave a comment:


  • rogue06
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post

    I've never seen or heard a JW insult any other person, anywhere, for any reason.

    The Quakers are just the most peaceful, caring people. They let mostly any religious group use their premises in Canterbury, free of charge.
    I worked with a JW for over two years. Really big guy. A gentle giant. Ended up getting fired for sleeping on the job though.

    Then one day a mutual friend called and told me to look at the front page of the local paper. I found it online and lo and behold there was a picture of the guy. He had been arrested for attempted rape and police said he was a suspect in several other rapes in the area.

    I just looked him up and he got three life sentences Apparently one of his victims was a minor.

    It just goes to show that sometimes you just can't tell.

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    Yes in some respects I have more time for them than a lot of other Christian denominations. I find the Quakers very humane and tolerant as well and, like the JWs, they have been persecuted by their own Christian brethren.
    I've never seen or heard a JW insult any other person, anywhere, for any reason.

    The Quakers are just the most peaceful, caring people. They let mostly any religious group use their premises in Canterbury, free of charge.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post
    Most interesting.
    We just don't go anywhere now.
    [/quote] Who does? We have managed a few visits to friends who live at some distance but we are both now really having das Fernweh - a desire to travel [and hike]



    Originally posted by eider View Post
    The last time I went to London was in about 2013 to meet an Indian Goldsmith who had flown in to visit the Goldsmith's exhibition in Haymarket...... (we used to argue on a religion forum a lot! ).... the furthest place I've been to in recent years has been Canterbury, a whole 7 miles away. But I do go to Sidcup SE London next Tuesday to collect a new Electric Motorcycle.
    I've not been to London for several years either. I was half hoping we might get there this year for the Nero exhibition at the BM but it was not to be.

    Originally posted by eider View Post


    I don't mind the JWs. The same couple have been visiting here for over 30 years now. They must know we are a total waste of time but my wife makes a brilliant cappuccino and they know that they can park their car on our forecourt (parking is difficult around here). The wife is so quiet but she has a brilliant mind and sometimes will nudge her husband to quietly put him straight about details.
    Yes in some respects I have more time for them than a lot of other Christian denominations. I find the Quakers very humane and tolerant as well and, like the JWs, they have been persecuted by their own Christian brethren.





    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
    I lived for most the 1980s in England and I visit regularly [well I did until Covid arrived]!
    Most interesting.
    We just don't go anywhere now.
    The last time I went to London was in about 2013 to meet an Indian Goldsmith who had flown in to visit the Goldsmith's exhibition in Haymarket...... (we used to argue on a religion forum a lot! ).... the furthest place I've been to in recent years has been Canterbury, a whole 7 miles away. But I do go to Sidcup SE London next Tuesday to collect a new Electric Motorcycle.

    His door knock technique reminds me on an anecdote [no doubt apocryphal] of the author T H White answering the door to Jehovah's Witnesses. In response to their introductory comment he is supposed to have replied "Pleased to meet you I am Jehovah. Now how are things going?"

    I don't mind the JWs. The same couple have been visiting here for over 30 years now. They must know we are a total waste of time but my wife makes a brilliant cappuccino and they know that they can park their car on our forecourt (parking is difficult around here). The wife is so quiet but she has a brilliant mind and sometimes will nudge her husband to quietly put him straight about details.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post
    You get about.
    I lived for most the 1980s in England and I visit regularly [well I did until Covid arrived]!

    Originally posted by eider View Post
    Oh, wow...... I don't know, but he was a very nice bloke and was highly valued in the store where he worked. He could talk down trouble, he just had the personality to take folks down from aggression, or red heat. He was a door knocker in his spare time. He told me his door-knock 'intro' once, not to be forgotten. 'Hi, my name's David and I've been ordained by God to answer your questions about Jesus'. ........ and he was very very successful. The huge homeowner, wrapped in soaking towel and screaming 'You got me out of the shower you ----!' just didn't cause a ripple in his countenance and he had the quiet peaceful confidence of the Taekwondo black. I liked him, enjoyed buying him a coffee during store visits. The women went mad about him! True.
    His door knock technique reminds me on an anecdote [no doubt apocryphal] of the author T H White answering the door to Jehovah's Witnesses. In response to their introductory comment he is supposed to have replied "Pleased to meet you I am Jehovah. Now how are things going?"

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
    I visited Glastonbury many years ago - we walked up to the Tor - an amazing view of the Somerset Levels and of course we went to the abbey and saw the spot where the alleged skeletons of Arthur and Guenevere were exhumed and we also visited the Chalice Garden which was very pretty and tranquil despite all albeit the nonsense about Arthur, Jesus and etc .

    I recall the town itself being full of "alternative" shops and individuals as well as one or two rather good cafés.
    You get about.

    Your shop-guard wasn't a member of the Children of God cult was he?
    Oh, wow...... I don't know, but he was a very nice bloke and was highly valued in the store where he worked. He could talk down trouble, he just had the personality to take folks down from aggression, or red heat. He was a door knocker in his spare time. He told me his door-knock 'intro' once, not to be forgotten. 'Hi, my name's David and I've been ordained by God to answer your questions about Jesus'. ........ and he was very very successful. The huge homeowner, wrapped in soaking towel and screaming 'You got me out of the shower you ----!' just didn't cause a ripple in his countenance and he had the quiet peaceful confidence of the Taekwondo black. I liked him, enjoyed buying him a coffee during store visits. The women went mad about him! True.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by eider View Post

    Interesting reading!
    I doubt that we (UK) have quite so many interesting folks in a single location, but Glastonbury Hill attracts a few groups of very strange people. Some Christians here believe that Jesus used to visit Cornwall, 1, as a child with @Joseph', 2, with the wealthy merchant Joseph of Arimathaea, and 3, some believe that Jesus escaped to Cornwall with him, setting up the first church upon Glastonbury Tor. So the place is a magnet for nuts as well as genuine religious people.
    I visited Glastonbury many years ago - we walked up to the Tor - an amazing view of the Somerset Levels and of course we went to the abbey and saw the spot where the alleged skeletons of Arthur and Guenevere were exhumed and we also visited the Chalice Garden which was very pretty and tranquil despite all albeit the nonsense about Arthur, Jesus and etc .

    I recall the town itself being full of "alternative" shops and individuals as well as one or two rather good cafés.

    Originally posted by eider View Post
    Example:- I knew a shop guard who, on visiting Glastonbury Hill, was amazed by a lightning strike nearby and believed that God had ordained him to evangelize the message of Jesus. I never did quite understand the exact message but love making was a central theme within it. He was, however, a very good shop guard.
    Your shop-guard wasn't a member of the Children of God cult was he?

    Leave a comment:


  • eider
    replied
    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post
    Jerusalem Syndrome
    Interesting reading!
    I doubt that we (UK) have quite so many interesting folks in a single location, but Glastonbury Hill attracts a few groups of very strange people. Some Christians here believe that Jesus used to visit Cornwall, 1, as a child with @Joseph', 2, with the wealthy merchant Joseph of Arimathaea, and 3, some believe that Jesus escaped to Cornwall with him, setting up the first church upon Glastonbury Tor. So the place is a magnet for nuts as well as genuine religious people.

    Example:- I knew a shop guard who, on visiting Glastonbury Hill, was amazed by a lightning strike nearby and believed that God had ordained him to evangelize the message of Jesus. I never did quite understand the exact message but love making was a central theme within it. He was, however, a very good shop guard.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hypatia_Alexandria
    replied
    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    That came out of the blue and is not connected in any way to any post in this thread.
    In my reply at post #7 I quoted what you had written on this thread https://theologyweb.com/campus/forum...ds#post1287320 and hence I used the phrase "to quote your good self".

    To which you replied at post # 8

    Originally posted by rogue06 View Post
    More appropriate for the post it responded to.
    And to which I replied at post #9

    Originally posted by Hypatia_Alexandria View Post

    Given the comments by Athas, it would appear not. He holds that bytdwd should be considered as a toponym and not a personal name.
    Post #9 was therefore making a direct reference back to your original remark which appeared on that other thread.



    .

    Leave a comment:

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