Announcement

Collapse

Health Science 101 Guidelines

Greetings! Welcome to Health Science.

Here's where we talk about the latest fad diets, the advantages of vegetarianism, the joy of exercise and good health. Like everywhere else at Tweb our decorum rules apply.

This is a place to exchange ideas and network with other health conscience folks, this isn't a forum for heated debate.
See more
See less

Autism Discussion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Autism Discussion

    This is an interesting thread. I say that with respect to the general topic of autism and its possible markers, and not Hypatia, as I've not interacted with her and couldn't comment.

    I'm on the spectrum, and was not diagnosed until adulthood. I'm currently trying to figure out whether I think there's a stigma, and I have conflicting thoughts about it. I think people generally are trying to be more and more accepting of the label, and there's been a lot of improvement there societally speaking. That said--and speaking purely for myself here--I very rarely feel listened to as someone on the spectrum. So from my perspective, there's not a stigma so much as a failure on the behavioral level. There have been people for example, acquaintances and low-level friends, that I've told my diagnosis to and it made no difference in their interaction with me, when I expected it would have. Like they "heard" me but didn't really hear me. I recently left a good chat group that I'd at one point hoped to be a meaningful member of, in fact, because I'd opened up to them about this and there was no meaningful change in their interaction with me as a result--even from one who was married to someone on the spectrum, so you'd think she'd know better, which is ironic and kind of sad. This is typical, in my experience.

    Cerebrum is right about "autistic" being used as a quasi-insult, e.g., "autistic screeching" memes. Strangely, these actually don't bother me at all and I don't really know why. Maybe they should.

    Just some random thoughts of mine, since the subject is close to my heart.
    I DENOUNCE DONALD J. TRUMP AND ALL HIS IMMORAL ACTS.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Zymologist View Post
    This is an interesting thread. I say that with respect to the general topic of autism and its possible markers, and not Hypatia, as I've not interacted with her and couldn't comment.

    I'm on the spectrum, and was not diagnosed until adulthood. I'm currently trying to figure out whether I think there's a stigma, and I have conflicting thoughts about it. I think people generally are trying to be more and more accepting of the label, and there's been a lot of improvement there societally speaking. That said--and speaking purely for myself here--I very rarely feel listened to as someone on the spectrum. So from my perspective, there's not a stigma so much as a failure on the behavioral level. There have been people for example, acquaintances and low-level friends, that I've told my diagnosis to and it made no difference in their interaction with me, when I expected it would have. Like they "heard" me but didn't really hear me. I recently left a good chat group that I'd at one point hoped to be a meaningful member of, in fact, because I'd opened up to them about this and there was no meaningful change in their interaction with me as a result--even from one who was married to someone on the spectrum, so you'd think she'd know better, which is ironic and kind of sad. This is typical, in my experience.

    Cerebrum is right about "autistic" being used as a quasi-insult, e.g., "autistic screeching" memes. Strangely, these actually don't bother me at all and I don't really know why. Maybe they should.

    Just some random thoughts of mine, since the subject is close to my heart.
    Thanks, Zym. Always great to see you. Sometimes you even post good stuff!
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Zymologist View Post
      This is an interesting thread. I say that with respect to the general topic of autism and its possible markers, and not Hypatia, as I've not interacted with her and couldn't comment.

      I'm on the spectrum, and was not diagnosed until adulthood. I'm currently trying to figure out whether I think there's a stigma, and I have conflicting thoughts about it. I think people generally are trying to be more and more accepting of the label, and there's been a lot of improvement there societally speaking. That said--and speaking purely for myself here--I very rarely feel listened to as someone on the spectrum. So from my perspective, there's not a stigma so much as a failure on the behavioral level. There have been people for example, acquaintances and low-level friends, that I've told my diagnosis to and it made no difference in their interaction with me, when I expected it would have. Like they "heard" me but didn't really hear me. I recently left a good chat group that I'd at one point hoped to be a meaningful member of, in fact, because I'd opened up to them about this and there was no meaningful change in their interaction with me as a result--even from one who was married to someone on the spectrum, so you'd think she'd know better, which is ironic and kind of sad. This is typical, in my experience.

      Cerebrum is right about "autistic" being used as a quasi-insult, e.g., "autistic screeching" memes. Strangely, these actually don't bother me at all and I don't really know why. Maybe they should.

      Just some random thoughts of mine, since the subject is close to my heart.
      I think we see a higher than average number of people on the spectrum on online forums like Theologyweb. As well as people with other social problems. I think it is because it provides a place where they can fit in and not have to worry about face to face social interactions. I myself am a bit shy in real life in social situations when I don't know someone, and only let my real personality out when I get to know them. I tend to do better in professional settings where I feel I have some expertise on the matters. So I like online forums as a place I can make friends and express myself without having to feel weird about it.
      As far as I know I am not on the spectrum, it's just a personality trait. But who knows?


      Comment


      • #4
        OK, so, asking out of genuine curiosity, and quite serious....

        Are people with Asperger's disproportionally represented on discussion boards?
        Is that a thing?

        Prior to being on this board, I had never encountered such.
        "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
          OK, so, asking out of genuine curiosity, and quite serious....

          Are people with Asperger's disproportionally represented on discussion boards?
          Is that a thing?

          Prior to being on this board, I had never encountered such.
          It is easier than communicating IRL. So I would say, yes, there are a lot of people on internet forums who are on the spectrum. I literally didn't have close friends until I started going online, and even then I didn't make friends until I learned how to talk to people there. For whatever reason, the social skills needed to talk to people online were a lot easier for me to grasp than the ones needed IRL.
          Curiosity never hurt anyone. It was stupidity that killed the cat.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post
            OK, so, asking out of genuine curiosity, and quite serious....

            Are people with Asperger's disproportionally represented on discussion boards?
            Is that a thing?

            Prior to being on this board, I had never encountered such.
            Yes, I'd say so to a degree. Then again there are also probably a decent amount of people you know who have it, but either you don't know, or they don't know. Anthony Hopkins is a famous example of someone who was not diagnosed until much later in life. I think he was in his 70's when he got the diagnosis.

            TWeb is the first place where I began encountering people on the spectrum in any real capacity. At least that I know of. Given how there are people on the spectrum who are really good at masking their traits, some are effectively invisible unless you are told.

            Originally posted by QuantaFille View Post

            It is easier than communicating IRL. So I would say, yes, there are a lot of people on internet forums who are on the spectrum. I literally didn't have close friends until I started going online, and even then I didn't make friends until I learned how to talk to people there. For whatever reason, the social skills needed to talk to people online were a lot easier for me to grasp than the ones needed IRL.
            A lot of people with Asperger's communicate better with text. No pesky body language to interpret, no one to see you stimming, and plenty of time to formulate a response to what was posted. Dr. Tony Attwood says that for some people their Asperger's disappears when they are online.

            Originally posted by QuantaFille

            Do you think it's coincidence that she has so many behavioral markers for it? Or do you think she's faking it?
            It's not like trolling and being on the spectrum are mutually exclusive either.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

              Yes, I'd say so to a degree. Then again there are also probably a decent amount of people you know who have it, but either you don't know, or they don't know. Anthony Hopkins is a famous example of someone who was not diagnosed until much later in life. I think he was in his 70's when he got the diagnosis.

              TWeb is the first place where I began encountering people on the spectrum in any real capacity. At least that I know of. Given how there are people on the spectrum who are really good at masking their traits, some are effectively invisible unless you are told.



              A lot of people with Asperger's communicate better with text. No pesky body language to interpret, no one to see you stimming, and plenty of time to formulate a response to what was posted. Dr. Tony Attwood says that for some people their Asperger's disappears when they are online.



              It's not like trolling and being on the spectrum are mutually exclusive either.
              Thanks guys - not only is this helpful, but I think I actually am learning a thing or two.
              "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                Thanks guys - not only is this helpful, but I think I actually am learning a thing or two.
                You're welcome. If you have any more questions on the topic I can try and answer. If I don't have an answer, well it will just be another thing to add to my research pile.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post
                  You're welcome. If you have any more questions on the topic I can try and answer. If I don't have an answer, well it will just be another thing to add to my research pile.
                  OK, forgive me if this sounds dumb, but would different cultures (let's pick a country at random, say... um... Germany) have different views on / and or stigmas related to this condition?

                  And, forgive me again, but this so much reminds me of when my older brother had epilepsy, and back then it was viewed so incredibly differently than it is today. Mom and Dad were told by the doctor that he needed to be "treated differently", and John was no dummy -- he figured out he could pretty much get away with anything, because he was "different".
                  "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                    OK, forgive me if this sounds dumb, but would different cultures (let's pick a country at random, say... um... Germany) have different views on / and or stigmas related to this condition?

                    And, forgive me again, but this so much reminds me of when my older brother had epilepsy, and back then it was viewed so incredibly differently than it is today. Mom and Dad were told by the doctor that he needed to be "treated differently", and John was no dummy -- he figured out he could pretty much get away with anything, because he was "different".
                    Given different countries are harsher on those deemed "strange" or "different" there will be a harsher stigma in said countries. I don't know much about Germany, but I can use an example from a country I do know a bit more about. As much as I find Japan fascinating they can be very harsh on those who don't fit in*. Even something as simple as having different hair color to the majority can be heavily discriminated against. I recall one account where a person had to have a doctors note to prove their hair was naturally brown instead of black. Even when they got the note, they weren't believed.

                    Your mention of how John could get away with anything because he was "different" is something that definitely happens with many different conditions, and not just mental or neurological ones. I've been accused of "milking" my RSD/CRPS by family members. Some people will use anything they can to get their way. Some people with Asperger's probably do this as well. My brother once mentioned he thinks most people with Asperger's are just mentioning it as an excuse to be jerks. I know that isn't anywhere near the case with everybody, but apparently that is what he perceived to be the case with those he had met. Exploiting the fact you have a medical condition for such things always bothered me, but I don't know of any way to really stop it from happening or being perceived as happening even when it isn't.

                    *I can say from experience that the US can be really bad in this kind of thing too, just usually over different traits or behaviors. I've been priority number one for bullies in many places I've been to. Even as young as four I was being tortured, and no, torture isn't an exaggeration here.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

                      Given different countries are harsher on those deemed "strange" or "different" there will be a harsher stigma in said countries. I don't know much about Germany, but I can use an example from a country I do know a bit more about. As much as I find Japan fascinating they can be very harsh on those who don't fit in*. Even something as simple as having different hair color to the majority can be heavily discriminated against. I recall one account where a person had to have a doctors note to prove their hair was naturally brown instead of black. Even when they got the note, they weren't believed.

                      Your mention of how John could get away with anything because he was "different" is something that definitely happens with many different conditions, and not just mental or neurological ones. I've been accused of "milking" my RSD/CRPS by family members. Some people will use anything they can to get their way. Some people with Asperger's probably do this as well. My brother once mentioned he thinks most people with Asperger's are just mentioning it as an excuse to be jerks. I know that isn't anywhere near the case with everybody, but apparently that is what he perceived to be the case with those he had met. Exploiting the fact you have a medical condition for such things always bothered me, but I don't know of any way to really stop it from happening or being perceived as happening even when it isn't.

                      *I can say from experience that the US can be really bad in this kind of thing too, just usually over different traits or behaviors. I've been priority number one for bullies in many places I've been to. Even as young as four I was being tortured, and no, torture isn't an exaggeration here.
                      Yeah, it's like the whole PTSD thing -- men, in particular, don't ever want to admit they might have emotional problems, and they see PTSD as "all about emotions". I think we mentioned that PTSD is not new -- it's the new "Shellshocked" - but that sounded like something you got by actually being in war and being bombed or something.

                      But I do know a guy who was diagnosed PTSD, and he milks it for all it's worth.

                      I appreciate you discussing this.
                      "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                        Yeah, it's like the whole PTSD thing -- men, in particular, don't ever want to admit they might have emotional problems, and they see PTSD as "all about emotions". I think we mentioned that PTSD is not new -- it's the new "Shellshocked" - but that sounded like something you got by actually being in war and being bombed or something.

                        But I do know a guy who was diagnosed PTSD, and he milks it for all it's worth.

                        I appreciate you discussing this.
                        The change of names in diagnoses is common. I have Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, but when I was first diagnosed it was called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, and before that Causalgia. Asperger's is technically no longer a separate diagnosis from Autism Spectrum Disorder, which at one point was called childhood Schizophrenia IIRC. With PTSD it has been known as Shellshock, as you mention, as well as Battle Fatigue, among other names. I think one of the reasons it is so highly associated with military conflict is because that is where some of the most severe cases come from. Just like Asperger's or what would now be deemed Autism Spectrum Disorder level 1. Or in other words mild levels of support needs. Only the more extreme cases were noticed, and anything less than that was just deemed "weird", or "difficult".

                        Men not wanting to deal with emotions as much is definitely partly due to society. One of my uncles was the type to drill the point home that guys are not supposed to cry. Bottling up your emotions isn't a good way to deal with them. I still have a hard time with not bottling them up, but I know the kinds of problems it can cause. In my case it just leads to a meltdown or ends up more like a volcanic eruption of emotion all at once.

                        Sadly people who will exploit everything, including medical diagnoses, are out there and will do anything they can to get what they want. I don't really know of a solution to that.

                        I'm glad to be getting a real chance to talk about it more in depth. I've been researching the topic rather intensely* for the last 4 to 5 months. Only more recently have I felt more comfortable that I am properly understanding things.

                        *My family would say obsessively, and they are technically right. They don't even know half of the amount I've been researching it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

                          The change of names in diagnoses is common. I have Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, but when I was first diagnosed it was called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, and before that Causalgia. Asperger's is technically no longer a separate diagnosis from Autism Spectrum Disorder, which at one point was called childhood Schizophrenia IIRC. With PTSD it has been known as Shellshock, as you mention, as well as Battle Fatigue, among other names. I think one of the reasons it is so highly associated with military conflict is because that is where some of the most severe cases come from. Just like Asperger's or what would now be deemed Autism Spectrum Disorder level 1. Or in other words mild levels of support needs. Only the more extreme cases were noticed, and anything less than that was just deemed "weird", or "difficult".

                          Men not wanting to deal with emotions as much is definitely partly due to society. One of my uncles was the type to drill the point home that guys are not supposed to cry. Bottling up your emotions isn't a good way to deal with them. I still have a hard time with not bottling them up, but I know the kinds of problems it can cause. In my case it just leads to a meltdown or ends up more like a volcanic eruption of emotion all at once.

                          Sadly people who will exploit everything, including medical diagnoses, are out there and will do anything they can to get what they want. I don't really know of a solution to that.

                          I'm glad to be getting a real chance to talk about it more in depth. I've been researching the topic rather intensely* for the last 4 to 5 months. Only more recently have I felt more comfortable that I am properly understanding things.

                          *My family would say obsessively, and they are technically right. They don't even know half of the amount I've been researching it.
                          I'll have more questions, and I'm glad you can talk about this -- but the pain meds are kicking in, and I think I'm about to zone out.
                          "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cow Poke View Post

                            I'll have more questions, and I'm glad you can talk about this -- but the pain meds are kicking in, and I think I'm about to zone out.
                            I definitely understand that. I got my second shot of the Covid-19 vaccine and have been more tired than usual. I ended up sleeping in a lot later than usual.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cerebrum123 View Post

                              I definitely understand that. I got my second shot of the Covid-19 vaccine and have been more tired than usual. I ended up sleeping in a lot later than usual.
                              OK, so back to the "wide awake" affect of the pain medicine.
                              "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

                              Comment

                              Related Threads

                              Collapse

                              Topics Statistics Last Post
                              Started by Teallaura, 05-28-2021, 10:00 AM
                              23 responses
                              139 views
                              2 likes
                              Last Post JimboJSR  
                              Started by mikewhitney, 05-25-2021, 10:43 PM
                              115 responses
                              470 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post rogue06
                              by rogue06
                               
                              Started by rogue06, 05-22-2021, 08:15 AM
                              22 responses
                              153 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post mikewhitney  
                              Started by Machinist, 05-11-2021, 02:26 PM
                              130 responses
                              926 views
                              0 likes
                              Last Post Stoic
                              by Stoic
                               
                              Working...
                              X