Announcement

Collapse

Health Science 101 Guidelines

Greetings! Welcome to Health Science.

Here's where we talk about the latest fad diets, the advantages of vegetarianism, the joy of exercise and good health. Like everywhere else at Tweb our decorum rules apply.

This is a place to exchange ideas and network with other health conscience folks, this isn't a forum for heated debate.
See more
See less

How can you have a baby who doesn't carry a gene that a parent might have?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How can you have a baby who doesn't carry a gene that a parent might have?

    How can you have a baby who doesn't carry a gene that a parent might have?
    I am become death...

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ana Dragule View Post
    How can you have a baby who doesn't carry a gene that a parent might have?
    Genes can remain recessive over generations. Parents can have babies who show a trait that is found in a grandparent or blood uncle or aunt or whatever. Genes are a complicated mix of dominant and recessive and even sometimes two dominants fighting for display.

    "Fire is catching. If we burn, you burn with us!"
    "I'm not going anywhere. I'm going to stay here and cause all kinds of trouble."
    Katniss Everdeen


    Christ our Passover has been sacrificed for us. Therefore let us keep the feast.

    Comment


    • #3
      Also, the genes of your children are half from you, half from your partner. So for any child of yours, they only have a copy of half your genes.

      Comment


      • #4
        I was thinking like a cancer gene.
        I am become death...

        Comment


        • #5
          Unless both parents carry a trait it's very easy for a given child to not have that trait. Even if both parents carry it, it may not be expressed in a given child. The only times a trait is certain to express is if both parents have it and neither has a recessive gene for it - or both only have recessive genes for it.

          "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot


          "Forgiveness is the way of love." Gary Chapman

          My Personal Blog

          My Novella blog (Current Novella Begins on 7/25/14)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ana Dragule View Post
            I was thinking like a cancer gene.
            Cancer has more to do with damage to gene than a trait that causes it.

            "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot


            "Forgiveness is the way of love." Gary Chapman

            My Personal Blog

            My Novella blog (Current Novella Begins on 7/25/14)

            Comment


            • #7
              There is one gene that we know of that's passed BRCA1 and 2 from mother to child which is a cause of breast cancer BUT Mothers don't necessarily pass it. Even in situations where we might see children with Tay-Sachs disease (such as both parents have the gene) realistically its only a one in four chance that they will have a child with Tay-Sachs. Diseases where there is a specific inherited "mutant genetic cause" are actually quite rare and not all children will inherit them . Its not like eye color by any means. Although when you go and look at the specifics of eye color, you can have multiple generations of parents with one color of eyes and then bam, end up with several children who have different color eyes due to either genetic alterations or intermarrying with a family that has genes for the expression of other eye color.
              A happy family is but an earlier heaven.
              George Bernard Shaw

              Comment


              • #8
                I am referring to a very specific situation in which there is a family history of a rare cancer and subsequent cancers outside of an affected region. This primary cancer, on the last website I read, has a 40 chance of being inherited. Given the family history...
                I am become death...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ana Dragule View Post
                  I am referring to a very specific situation in which there is a family history of a rare cancer and subsequent cancers outside of an affected region. This primary cancer, on the last website I read, has a 40 chance of being inherited. Given the family history...
                  I think the best comparison would be the BRCA gene. If both genes are inherited then the female child has a certain percentage of getting breast or ovarian cancer (its rather high in comparison to general population) However even if both parents are carriers its also possible that a child could 1) not recieve the gene markers, or recieve only 1 genetic marker or receive both genetic markers and still never get the disease because something something else has caused the genetic markers to "turn off" or not express at all. Genetic expression is never totally finite when it comes to inherited diseases it seems It appears to take two copies of a gene in the correct sequencing and they must both be of a dominant profile appearing in all chromosomal strains.
                  A happy family is but an earlier heaven.
                  George Bernard Shaw

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Catholicity View Post
                    I think the best comparison would be the BRCA gene. If both genes are inherited then the female child has a certain percentage of getting breast or ovarian cancer (its rather high in comparison to general population) However even if both parents are carriers its also possible that a child could 1) not recieve the gene markers, or recieve only 1 genetic marker or receive both genetic markers and still never get the disease because something something else has caused the genetic markers to "turn off" or not express at all. Genetic expression is never totally finite when it comes to inherited diseases it seems It appears to take two copies of a gene in the correct sequencing and they must both be of a dominant profile appearing in all chromosomal strains.
                    As I understand, RB is an autosomal dominant gene with an 80-90% penetration rate for RB or other cancers developing. It resides on neither the x nor the y chromosome.
                    I am become death...

                    Comment

                    Related Threads

                    Collapse

                    Topics Statistics Last Post
                    Started by NorrinRadd, Yesterday, 02:47 AM
                    1 response
                    11 views
                    0 likes
                    Last Post mikewhitney  
                    Started by NorrinRadd, 11-22-2020, 08:12 AM
                    9 responses
                    34 views
                    0 likes
                    Last Post Stoic
                    by Stoic
                     
                    Started by rogue06, 11-12-2020, 12:49 PM
                    3 responses
                    33 views
                    0 likes
                    Last Post Sherman
                    by Sherman
                     
                    Started by shunyadragon, 11-09-2020, 08:37 PM
                    0 responses
                    10 views
                    0 likes
                    Last Post shunyadragon  
                    Started by mikewhitney, 11-05-2020, 03:48 PM
                    31 responses
                    111 views
                    0 likes
                    Last Post Stoic
                    by Stoic
                     
                    Working...
                    X